Search Results

Author: Goodnight, Jackson A.
Resulting in 7 citations.
1. D'Onofrio, Brian M.
Goodnight, Jackson A.
Van Hulle, Carol A.
Rodgers, Joseph Lee
Rathouz, Paul J.
Waldman, Irwin D.
Lahey, Benjamin B.
A Quasi-Experimental Analysis of the Association Between Family Income and Offspring Conduct Problems
Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology 37,3 (April 2009):415–429.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/c84v1067388u5786/
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Age at First Birth; Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB); Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Behavior, Antisocial; Birth Order; Family Characteristics; Family Income; Gender Differences; Kinship; Modeling, Multilevel; Mothers, Behavior; Siblings; Variables, Independent - Covariate

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The study presents a quasi-experimental analysis of data on 9,194 offspring (ages 4–11 years old) of women from a nationally representative U.S. sample of households to test the causal hypotheses about the association between family income and childhood conduct problems (CPs). Comparison of unrelated individuals in the sample indicated a robust inverse association, with the relation being larger at higher levels of income and for male offspring, even when statistical covariates were included to account for measured confounds that distinguish different families. Offspring also were compared to their siblings and cousins who were exposed to different levels of family income in childhood to rule out unmeasured environmental and genetic factors confounded with family income as explanations for the association. In these within-family analyses, boys exposed to lower family income still exhibited significantly higher levels of CPs. When considered in the context of previous studies using different designs, these results support the inference that family income influences CPs, particularly in males, through causal environmental processes specifically related to earnings within the nuclear family.
Bibliography Citation
D'Onofrio, Brian M., Jackson A. Goodnight, Carol A. Van Hulle, Joseph Lee Rodgers, Paul J. Rathouz, Irwin D. Waldman and Benjamin B. Lahey. "A Quasi-Experimental Analysis of the Association Between Family Income and Offspring Conduct Problems." Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology 37,3 (April 2009):415–429. A.
2. D'Onofrio, Brian M.
Goodnight, Jackson A.
Van Hulle, Carol A.
Rodgers, Joseph Lee
Rathouz, Paul J.
Waldman, Irwin D.
Lahey, Benjamin B.
Maternal Age at Childbirth and Offspring Disruptive Behaviors: Testing the Causal Hypothesis
Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry 50,8 (August 2009): 1018-1028.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1469-7610.2009.02068.x/full
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing, Inc. => Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Age at Birth; Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Child Self-Administered Supplement (CSAS); Children, Behavioral Development; Delinquency/Gang Activity; Siblings

Recent studies suggest that the association between Background: maternal age at childbearing (MAC) and children's disruptive behaviors is the result of family factors that are confounded with both variables, rather than a casual effect of environmental factors specifically related to MAC. These studies, however, relied on restricted samples and did not use the strongest approach to test causal influences.

Using data on 9,171 4–9-year-old and 6,592 10–13-year-old Methods: offspring of women from a nationally representative sample of US households, we conducted sibling-comparison analyses. The analyses ruled out all genetic factors that could confound the association, as well as all environmental confounds that differ between unrelated nuclear families, providing a strong test of the causal hypothesis that the environments of children born at different maternal ages influence mother- and self-reported disruptive behaviors.

When these genetic and environmental confounds were ruled out Results: as alternative explanations, the relation between environments within nuclear families specifically associated with MAC and disruptive behaviors was robust, with the association being stronger for second- and third-born children.

Environmental factors specifically associated with early Conclusions: MAC within nuclear families account for increased risk of offspring disruptive behaviors, especially in later-born children.

Bibliography Citation
D'Onofrio, Brian M., Jackson A. Goodnight, Carol A. Van Hulle, Joseph Lee Rodgers, Paul J. Rathouz, Irwin D. Waldman and Benjamin B. Lahey. "Maternal Age at Childbirth and Offspring Disruptive Behaviors: Testing the Causal Hypothesis." Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry 50,8 (August 2009): 1018-1028.
3. D'Onofrio, Brian M.
Van Hulle, Carol A.
Goodnight, Jackson A.
Rathouz, Paul J.
Lahey, Benjamin B.
Is Maternal Smoking During Pregnancy a Causal Environmental Risk Factor for Adolescent Antisocial Behavior? Testing Etiological Theories and Assumptions
Psychological Medicine 42,7 (July 2012): 1535-1545.
Also: http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract?fromPage=online&aid=8594215&fulltextType=RA&fileId=S0033291711002443
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Keyword(s): Adolescent Behavior; Crime; Delinquency/Gang Activity; Pre/post Natal Behavior; Smoking (see Cigarette Use)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Background: Although many studies indicate that maternal smoking during pregnancy (SDP) is correlated with later offspring antisocial behavior (ASB), recent quasi-experimental studies suggest that background familial factors confound the association. The present study sought to test alternative etiological hypotheses using multiple indices of adolescent ASB, comparing differentially exposed siblings, and testing assumptions in the sibling-comparison design.

Method: The study examined the association between maternal SDP and adolescent-reported ASB, criminal convictions and membership in a group of individuals with early-starting and chronic ASB among 6066 offspring of women from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, a representative sample of women in the USA. The analyses controlled for statistical covariates and examined associations while comparing differentially exposed siblings.

Results: At the population level, each additional pack of cigarettes per day predicted greater mean adolescent-reported ASB symptoms [ratio of means 1.15, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.08–1.22], odds of being in the top 10% of ASB [odds ratio (OR) 1.34, 95% CI 1.10–1.65], hazard of a criminal conviction [hazard ratio (HR) 1.51, 95% CI 1.34–1.68] and odds of chronic ASB (OR 1.57, 95% CI 1.25–1.99). SDP robustly predicted most assessments of ASB while controlling for measured covariates. When siblings exposed to differing levels of SDP were compared, however, all of the associations were attenuated and were not statistically significant: adolescent-reported mean ASB (ratio of means 0.86, 95% CI 0.74–1.01), high ASB (OR 0.67, 95% CI 0.41–1.12), criminal conviction (HR 0.98, 95% CI 0.66–1.44) and chronic ASB (OR 0.80, 95% CI 0.46–1.38).

Conclusions: The results strongly suggest that familial factors account for the correlation between SDP and offspring adolescent ASB, rather than a putative causal environmental influence of SDP.

Bibliography Citation
D'Onofrio, Brian M., Carol A. Van Hulle, Jackson A. Goodnight, Paul J. Rathouz and Benjamin B. Lahey. "Is Maternal Smoking During Pregnancy a Causal Environmental Risk Factor for Adolescent Antisocial Behavior? Testing Etiological Theories and Assumptions." Psychological Medicine 42,7 (July 2012): 1535-1545.
4. Ellingson, Jarrod M.
Goodnight, Jackson A.
Van Hulle, Carol A.
Waldman, Irwin D.
D'Onofrio, Brian M.
A Sibling-Comparison Study of Smoking During Pregnancy and Childhood Psychological Traits
Behavior Genetics 44,1 (January 2014): 25-35.
Also: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10519-013-9618-6
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Behavior Genetics Association
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Cigarette Use (see Smoking); Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Modeling, Growth Curve/Latent Trajectory Analysis; Mothers, Behavior; Mothers, Health; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT); Pre-natal Care/Exposure; Pre/post Natal Behavior; Siblings; Smoking (see Cigarette Use); Temperament

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Prenatal exposure to substances of abuse is associated with numerous psychological problems in offspring, but quasi-experimental studies controlling for co-occurring risk factors suggest that familial factors (e.g., genetic and environmental effects shared among siblings) confound many associations with maternal smoking during pregnancy (SDP). Few of the quasi-experimental studies in this area have explored normative psychological traits in early childhood or developmental changes across the lifespan, however. The current study used multilevel growth curve models with a large, nationally-representative sample in the United States to investigate for potential effects of SDP on the developmental trajectories of cognitive functioning, temperament/personality, and disruptive behavior across childhood, while accounting for shared familial confounds by comparing differentially exposed siblings and statistically controlling for offspring-specific covariates. Maternal SDP predicted the intercept (but not change over time) for all cognitive and externalizing outcomes. Accounting for familial confounds, however, attenuated the association between SDP exposure and all outcomes, except the intercept (age 5) for reading recognition. These findings, which are commensurate with previous quasi-experimental research on more severe indices of adolescent and adult problems, suggest that the associations between SDP and developmental traits in childhood are due primarily to confounding factors and not a causal association.
Bibliography Citation
Ellingson, Jarrod M., Jackson A. Goodnight, Carol A. Van Hulle, Irwin D. Waldman and Brian M. D'Onofrio. "A Sibling-Comparison Study of Smoking During Pregnancy and Childhood Psychological Traits." Behavior Genetics 44,1 (January 2014): 25-35.
5. Goodnight, Jackson A.
D'Onofrio, Brian M.
Cherlin, Andrew J.
Emery, Robert E.
Van Hulle, Carol A.
Lahey, Benjamin B.
Effects of Multiple Maternal Relationship Transitions on Offspring Antisocial Behavior in Childhood and Adolescence: A Cousin-Comparison Analysis
Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology 41,2 (February 2013): 185-198.
Also: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10802-012-9667-y
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Behavior, Antisocial; Birth Order; Delinquency/Gang Activity; Genetics; Kinship; Marital Instability; Modeling, Multilevel; Parental Influences; Pre-natal Care/Exposure; Siblings

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Previous studies of the association between multiple parental relationship transitions (i.e., when a parent begins or terminates an intimate relationship involving cohabitation) and offspring antisocial behavior have varied in their efforts to rule out confounding influences, such as parental antisocial behavior and low income. They also have been limited in the representativeness of their samples. Thus, it remains unclear to what degree parents’ multiple relationship transitions have independent effects on children’s antisocial behavior. Analyses were conducted using data on 8,652 6–9-year-old, 6,911 10–13-year-old, and 6,495 14–17-year-old offspring of a nationally representative sample of U.S. women. Cousin-comparisons were used in combination with statistical covariates to evaluate the associations between maternal relationship transitions and offspring antisocial behavior in childhood and adolescence. Cousin-comparisons suggested that associations between maternal relationship transitions and antisocial behavior in childhood and early adolescence are largely explained by confounding factors. In contrast, the associations between maternal relationship transitions and offspring delinquency in late adolescence were robust to measured and unmeasured confounds. The present findings suggest that interventions aimed at reducing exposure to parental relationship transitions or addressing the psychosocial consequences of exposure to parental relationship transitions could reduce risk for offspring delinquency in late adolescence.
Bibliography Citation
Goodnight, Jackson A., Brian M. D'Onofrio, Andrew J. Cherlin, Robert E. Emery, Carol A. Van Hulle and Benjamin B. Lahey. "Effects of Multiple Maternal Relationship Transitions on Offspring Antisocial Behavior in Childhood and Adolescence: A Cousin-Comparison Analysis." Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology 41,2 (February 2013): 185-198.
6. Goodnight, Jackson A.
Donahue, Kelly L
Waldman, Irwin D.
Van Hulle, Carol A.
Rathouz, Paul J.
Lahey, Benjamin B.
D'Onofrio, Brian M.
Genetic and Environmental Contributions to Associations between Infant Fussy Temperament and Antisocial Behavior in Childhood and Adolescence
Behavior Genetics 46,5 (September 2016): 680-692.
Also: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10519-016-9794-2
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Behavior Genetics Association
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Behavior, Antisocial; Children, Temperament; Delinquency/Gang Activity; Genetics; Kinship; Modeling, Biometric; Modeling, Multilevel; Siblings

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Previous research suggests that fussy temperament in infancy predicts risk for later antisocial behavior (ASB) in childhood and adolescence. It remains unclear, however, to what extent infant fussiness is related to later ASB through causal processes or if they both reflect the same family risk factors for ASB. The current study used two approaches, the comparison of siblings and bivariate biometric modeling, to reduce familial confounding and examine genetic and environmental influences on associations between fussiness in the first 2 years of life and ASB in childhood and late adolescence. Analyses were conducted on data from a prospective cohort (9237 at 4–9 years and 7034 at 14–17 years) who are the offspring of a nationally representative sample of US women. In the full sample, fussiness predicted both child and adolescent ASB to small but significant extents, controlling for a wide range of measured child and family-level covariates. When siblings who differed in their fussiness were compared, fussiness predicted ASB in childhood, but not ASB during adolescence. Furthermore, results from a bivariate Cholesky model suggested that even the association of fussiness with childhood ASB found when comparing siblings is attributable to familial factors. That is, although families with infants who are higher in fussiness also tend to have children and adolescents who engage in greater ASB, the hypothesis that infant fussiness has an environmentally mediated impact on the development of future ASB was not strongly supported.
Bibliography Citation
Goodnight, Jackson A., Kelly L Donahue, Irwin D. Waldman, Carol A. Van Hulle, Paul J. Rathouz, Benjamin B. Lahey and Brian M. D'Onofrio. "Genetic and Environmental Contributions to Associations between Infant Fussy Temperament and Antisocial Behavior in Childhood and Adolescence." Behavior Genetics 46,5 (September 2016): 680-692.
7. Goodnight, Jackson A.
Lahey, Benjamin B.
Van Hulle, Carol A.
Rodgers, Joseph Lee
Rathouz, Paul J.
Waldman, Irwin D.
D'Onofrio, Brian M.
A Quasi-Experimental Analysis of the Influence of Neighborhood Disadvantage on Child and Adolescent Conduct Problems
Journal of Abnormal Psychology 121,1 (February 2012): 95-108.
Also: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21942334
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: American Psychological Association (APA)
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB); Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Behavior, Antisocial; Birth Order; Delinquency/Gang Activity; Family Characteristics; Family Income; Gender Differences; Kinship; Modeling, Multilevel; Mothers, Behavior; Neighborhood Effects; Siblings; Variables, Independent - Covariate

A quasi-experimental comparison of cousins differentially exposed to levels of neighborhood disadvantage (ND) was used with extensive measured covariates to test the hypothesis that neighborhood risk has independent effects on youth conduct problems (CPs). Multilevel analyses were based on mother-rated ND and both mother-reported CPs across 4-13 years (n = 7,077) and youth-reported CPs across 10-13 years (n = 4,524) from the Children of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. ND was robustly related to CPs reported by both informants when controlling for both measured risk factors that are correlated with ND and unmeasured confounds. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that ND has influence on conduct problems.
Bibliography Citation
Goodnight, Jackson A., Benjamin B. Lahey, Carol A. Van Hulle, Joseph Lee Rodgers, Paul J. Rathouz, Irwin D. Waldman and Brian M. D'Onofrio. "A Quasi-Experimental Analysis of the Influence of Neighborhood Disadvantage on Child and Adolescent Conduct Problems." Journal of Abnormal Psychology 121,1 (February 2012): 95-108.