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Author: Caputo, Jennifer
Resulting in 3 citations.
1. Caputo, Jennifer
Pavalko, Eliza K.
Hardy, Melissa A.
Midlife Work and Women's Long-Term Health and Mortality
Presented: Denver CO, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April 2018
Cohort(s): Mature Women
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Health, Mental; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Labor Force Participation; Mortality

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

While paid work is a well-established predictor of health, several gaps in our knowledge about the relationship between work and later health and mortality remain, including whether these benefits remain stable over long periods and whether they are dependent on job characteristics and experiences. We draw on over three decades of data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Mature Women to assess how labor force participation over a period of twenty years during midlife affects mental and physical health and mortality over the following fourteen to twenty-three years. We find that persistent work earlier in life continues to predict improved health and longevity many years later as women pass retirement, even after accounting for many health-linked variations in this work experiences and the presence of later life work. These findings add to knowledge about the cumulative nature through which key adult social experiences shape health as individuals enter later life. Note: A similar paper was presented in Philadelphia PA, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2018.
Bibliography Citation
Caputo, Jennifer, Eliza K. Pavalko and Melissa A. Hardy. "Midlife Work and Women's Long-Term Health and Mortality." Presented: Denver CO, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April 2018.
2. Caputo, Jennifer
Pavalko, Eliza K.
Hardy, Melissa A.
The Long-Term Effects of Caregiving on Women's Health and Mortality
Journal of Marriage and Family 78,5 (October 2016): 1382-1398.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jomf.12332/abstract
Cohort(s): Mature Women
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing, Inc. => Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Caregivers, Adult Children; Depression (see also CESD); Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Life Course; Mortality

Caregivers experience numerous mental and physical health effects from the stress of providing care, but we know little about whether these problems persist in the long term and whether long-term effects differ across caregiving contexts. Using the National Longitudinal Survey of Mature Women, we examined the relationship between caregiving and long-term patterns of depressive symptoms, functional limitations, and mortality. We also explored the health effects of caregiving in-home versus out-of-home and by caregiver/care-recipient relationship. Analyses show that in-home spousal and parental caregiving predict increased depressive symptoms and functional limitations in the long term but are unassociated with mortality, whereas caregiving outside the home is unassociated with later depression and functional limitations but predicts a lower risk of mortality. This study highlights the usefulness of approaching stressful experiences such as caregiving from the life course perspective, viewing them as processes that unfold over time within specific contexts that may carry delayed or cumulative consequences.
Bibliography Citation
Caputo, Jennifer, Eliza K. Pavalko and Melissa A. Hardy. "The Long-Term Effects of Caregiving on Women's Health and Mortality." Journal of Marriage and Family 78,5 (October 2016): 1382-1398.
3. Pavalko, Eliza K.
Caputo, Jennifer
Hardy, Melissa A.
Long-term Effects of Employment and Employment Discrimination on Women's Health and Mortality
Presented: Dublin, Ireland, Society for Longitudinal and Life Course Studies (SLLS) International Conference, October 2015
Cohort(s): Mature Women
Publisher: Society for Longitudinal and Life Course Studies
Keyword(s): Depression (see also CESD); Discrimination, Age; Discrimination, Employer; Discrimination, Job; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Labor Force Participation; Mortality; Retirement

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The short-term health effects of discrimination have been well documented, but we know much less about whether these health effects persist even after the risk of further discriminatory experiences is eliminated. In this paper we use long-term longitudinal data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Mature Women and newly matched mortality records to examine whether the health effects of work discrimination persist into later life, when most women are no longer working, and whether they extend to mortality. We find that 8 percent of women report experiencing work discrimination over a 5 year period when they are between the ages of 47-66 and that the most commonly reported form of discrimination is age discrimination. After controlling for prior health, we find that women who reported experiencing workplace discrimination over this time also reported more depressive symptoms and more functional limitations at the end of the period than did women who were employed during the same period but did not report experiencing work discrimination. Women who were not employed during that same period also had more emotional and physical health problems than those who worked but did not experience discrimination. These health differences continue as women age and move into retirement even though the risk of work discrimination is eliminated, but they do not extend to all-cause mortality. Our findings suggest that the health effects of work discrimination are both broad and persistent as they impact both physical and emotional health and remain significant as women move into their retirement years. They also point to the long-term health benefits women gain from non-discriminatory employment experiences.
Bibliography Citation
Pavalko, Eliza K., Jennifer Caputo and Melissa A. Hardy. "Long-term Effects of Employment and Employment Discrimination on Women's Health and Mortality." Presented: Dublin, Ireland, Society for Longitudinal and Life Course Studies (SLLS) International Conference, October 2015.