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Author: Barron, John M.
Resulting in 4 citations.
1. Barron, John M.
Berger, Mark Charles
Black, Dan A.
How Well Do We Measure Training?
Journal of Labor Economics 15,3, pt. 1 (July 1997): 507-528.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1086/209870
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
Keyword(s): Training; Training, On-the-Job

This article compares various measures of on-the-job training, from a new source that matches establishments and workers, allowing us to compare the responses of employers and employees to identical training questions. Establishments report 25% more hours of training than do workers, although workers and establishments report similar incidence rates of training. Both establishment and worker measures agree that there is much more informal training than formal training. Further, informal training is measured about as accurately as formal training. Finally, we show that measurement error reduces substantially the observed effect of training, in particular the effect of training on productivity growth
Bibliography Citation
Barron, John M., Mark Charles Berger and Dan A. Black. "How Well Do We Measure Training?" Journal of Labor Economics 15,3, pt. 1 (July 1997): 507-528.
2. Barron, John M.
Berger, Mark Charles
Black, Dan A.
On-the-Job Training
Kalamazoo MI: W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research, 1997.
Also: http://www.upjohninst.org/publications/titles/ojt.html
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research
Keyword(s): Human Capital; Skills; Training, Employee; Training, On-the-Job; Transfers, Skill

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

From the Introduction: ...Researchers now widely accept that there are two key aspects of training. First, there is the recognition that on-the-job training is an important example of an "investment" in human capital. Like any investment, there are initial costs. For on-the-job training, these costs include the time devoted by the worker and co-workers to learning skills that increase productivity plus the costs of any equipment and material required to teach these skills. Like any investment, the returns to these expenditures occur in future periods. For on-the-job training, these future returns are measured by the increased productivity of the worker during subsequent periods of employment. The second key aspect of on-the-job training is the distinction between "general" and "specific" on-the-job training, a distinction emphasized by Becker in his early works. While all training increases the productivity of the worker at the firm providing the training, general training also increases the productivity of the worker at firms other than the one providing the training. For example, a secretary who learns the use of a standard work-processing program or a doctor who interns at a specific hospital both receive general training, as these skills are transferable to other workplaces. On the other hand, specific on-the-job training increases the productivity of the worker at the firm providing the training, but not at other firms. Resources spent orienting new employees to the practices of their new employer, or teaching employees how to contribute to a unique assembly process or work team, are examples of specific training.
Bibliography Citation
Barron, John M., Mark Charles Berger and Dan A. Black. On-the-Job Training. Kalamazoo MI: W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research, 1997..
3. Barron, John M.
Ewing, Bradley T.
Waddell, Glen R.
The Effects of High School Athletic Participation on Education and Labor Market Outcomes
The Review of Economics and Statistics 82,3 (August 2000): 409-421.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2646801
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Harvard University Press
Keyword(s): Athletics (see SPORTS); Educational Attainment; High School; Labor Market Outcomes; Leisure; NLS of H.S. Class of 1972; Sports (also see ATHLETICS); Time Use; Wage Effects; Wages

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

We introduce a simple allocation-of-time model to explain the high school athletic participation choice and the implications of this choice for educational and labor market outcomes. Four different factors that could explain athletic participation are identified in the context of this model. A variety of tests of the model are provided using two data sets: the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth and the National Longitudinal Study of the High School Class of 1972. We find some evidence that athletic participation directly affects wages and educational attainment. However, much of the effect of athletic participation on wages and educational attainment appears to reflect differences across individuals in ability or value of leisure.
Bibliography Citation
Barron, John M., Bradley T. Ewing and Glen R. Waddell. "The Effects of High School Athletic Participation on Education and Labor Market Outcomes." The Review of Economics and Statistics 82,3 (August 2000): 409-421.
4. Barron, John M.
Fraedrich, Ann
The Implications of Job Matching for Retirement Health Insurance and Leave Benefits
Applied Economics 26,5 (May 1994): 425-435.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00036849400000010
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Chapman & Hall
Keyword(s): Benefits, Fringe; Benefits, Insurance; Insurance, Health; Labor Turnover; Modeling, Logit; Retirement; Training, On-the-Job

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

A study suggests that differences in fringe benefit packages are related to employer size and to on-the-job training investment. Data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics' 1988 Employee Benefits Survey, a National Institute of Health 1982 employer survey, and the 1989 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth were examined. Logit estimates show that larger firms are more likely to offer retirement health insurance and temporary leaves. Results also indicate that jobs with substantial training are more likely to have fringe benefits such as retirement health insurance, presumably to attract workers with a low propensity for turnover. There is some evidence that jobs with higher training may be less likely to provide leaves, which is consistent with the finding that leave benefits are not directly correlated with worker tenure.
Bibliography Citation
Barron, John M. and Ann Fraedrich. "The Implications of Job Matching for Retirement Health Insurance and Leave Benefits." Applied Economics 26,5 (May 1994): 425-435.