Search Results

Author: Ewing, Bradley T.
Resulting in 10 citations.
1. Barron, John M.
Ewing, Bradley T.
Waddell, Glen R.
The Effects of High School Athletic Participation on Education and Labor Market Outcomes
The Review of Economics and Statistics 82,3 (August 2000): 409-421.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2646801
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Harvard University Press
Keyword(s): Athletics (see SPORTS); Educational Attainment; High School; Labor Market Outcomes; Leisure; NLS of H.S. Class of 1972; Sports (also see ATHLETICS); Time Use; Wage Effects; Wages

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

We introduce a simple allocation-of-time model to explain the high school athletic participation choice and the implications of this choice for educational and labor market outcomes. Four different factors that could explain athletic participation are identified in the context of this model. A variety of tests of the model are provided using two data sets: the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth and the National Longitudinal Study of the High School Class of 1972. We find some evidence that athletic participation directly affects wages and educational attainment. However, much of the effect of athletic participation on wages and educational attainment appears to reflect differences across individuals in ability or value of leisure.
Bibliography Citation
Barron, John M., Bradley T. Ewing and Glen R. Waddell. "The Effects of High School Athletic Participation on Education and Labor Market Outcomes." The Review of Economics and Statistics 82,3 (August 2000): 409-421.
2. Ewing, Bradley T.
A Note on School Size and Wages
Atlantic Economic Journal 23,3 (September 1995): 236.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/a12875xp2j25ph07/
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: International Atlantic Economic Society
Keyword(s): Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Education Indicators; Human Capital; School Quality; Schooling; Wages

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Much has been written on whether it is school quality or quantity that really matters in determining wages. Thetraditional human capital wage equation controls for the quantity of education (i.e., years of schooling) and generallyignores quality of education. The idea that quality might matter is not new. Hanushek JEL, 1986 reports that standardmeasures of school quality have no effect on wages of men in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY,including faculty-to-student ratio, teacher salaries, expenditures, and so forth). However, some have successfullyargued that school quality is at least as important as quantity by incorporating scores on the Armed ForcesQualification Test (AFQT) in the wage model as a proxy for quality Maxwell, ILR, 1994; O'Neill, JEP, 1990!. Thisnote considers one factor overlooked: what is the effect of high school size on wages controlling for quantity andquality? The hypothesis is that students at large schools must deal with a more diverse set of circumstances and thatfor a given quality and quantity level, they will fare better in the labor market than students from smaller schools.Having been exposed to more people and potentially more diverse cultures and situations, these students are betterequipped to deal with the myriad of work-related situations, such as working in teams and in a culturally diverseenvironment that they will inevitably encounter.
Bibliography Citation
Ewing, Bradley T. "A Note on School Size and Wages." Atlantic Economic Journal 23,3 (September 1995): 236.
3. Ewing, Bradley T.
Athletes and Work
Economics Letters 59,1 (April 1998): 113-117.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0165176598000068
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Athletics (see SPORTS); High School; Labor Market Outcomes; Sports (also see ATHLETICS); Unions

The paper has added to the literature by providing new empirical evidence on the labor market effects of participating in high school athletics using the 1990 wave of the National Longitudinal Surveys of Youth (NLSY) data set which allowed us to examine several measures of work attainment and provided a rich set of control variables. The major finding of this study is that former high school athletes are more likely to be in jobs that are associated with better labor market outcomes than their nonathlete counterparts. Copyright: Elsevier Science S. A.
Bibliography Citation
Ewing, Bradley T. "Athletes and Work." Economics Letters 59,1 (April 1998): 113-117.
4. Ewing, Bradley T.
High School Athletes and Marijuana Use
Journal of Drug Education 28,2 (1998): 147-157.
Also: http://baywood.metapress.com/app/home/contribution.asp?referrer=parent&backto=issue,5,6;journal,54,163;linkingpublicationresults,1:300320,1
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Baywood Publishing Co.
Keyword(s): Athletics (see SPORTS); Drug Use; Gender Differences; High School Students; Sports (also see ATHLETICS); Substance Use

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Identifying groups of young people that might be especially susceptible to marijuana use would aid in the design and implementation of drug policy programs. This article examines whether those who participated in high school athletics have a different pattern of marijuana use than comparable non-athletes. The results indicate that male athletes have a higher incidence of marijuana use than non-athletes. The same is not true for female athletes, who actually engage in less marijuana use than their non-athlete counterparts. However, female athletes are more likely than non-athletes to wait until their post-high school years to try the drug for the first time.
Bibliography Citation
Ewing, Bradley T. "High School Athletes and Marijuana Use." Journal of Drug Education 28,2 (1998): 147-157.
5. Ewing, Bradley T.
High School Athletics and the Wages of Black Males
The Review of Black Political Economy 24,1 (Summer 1995): 65-78.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/hl451370n61785t5/
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: National Economic Association
Keyword(s): Athletics (see SPORTS); Black Youth; High School; Human Capital; Modeling; Sports (also see ATHLETICS); Wage Differentials; Wage Effects; Wage Models

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This article examines the effects of high school athletic participation on the future wages of black males. Our evidence suggests that former black male athletes receive significantly greater wages than their otherwise comparable counterparts. Data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth was used for the analysis and allows for comparisons of the athlete premium to be made at different points in time. Both the human capital and signaling models are discussed. There appears to be a once and for all enhancement to human capital that accrues to black males who participated in high school athletics. The article adds to the literature on determinants of black male wages and on the earnings effects of athletic participation.
Bibliography Citation
Ewing, Bradley T. "High School Athletics and the Wages of Black Males." The Review of Black Political Economy 24,1 (Summer 1995): 65-78.
6. Ewing, Bradley T.
Labor Market Effects of High School Athletic Participation: Evidence from Wage and Fringe Benefit Differentials
Journal of Sports Economics 8,3 (June 2007): 255-265
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Athletics (see SPORTS); Benefits, Fringe; High School; Human Capital; Labor Market Outcomes; Occupational Choice; Skills; Sports (also see ATHLETICS); Wage Differentials; Wage Levels

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This article provides new empirical evidence on the labor market effects of participating in high school athletics. The study uses the 1990 wave of the National Longitudinal Surveys of Youth data set, which allows for the examination of a broad set of fringe benefits and provides a rich set of control variables. The major finding of this study is that former high school athletes fare better in terms of both components of the compensation structure (i.e., wages and fringe benefits) than their nonathlete counterparts.
Bibliography Citation
Ewing, Bradley T. "Labor Market Effects of High School Athletic Participation: Evidence from Wage and Fringe Benefit Differentials." Journal of Sports Economics 8,3 (June 2007): 255-265.
7. Ewing, Bradley T.
Wages and Performance-Based Pay: Evidence from the NLSY
Economics Letters 51,2 (May 1996): 241-246.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/016517659500775X
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Benefits; Benefits, Fringe; Human Capital; Labor Economics; Modeling; Occupational Choice; Performance pay; Training, On-the-Job; Wage Determination

The link between performance and pay should be strongest where performance is more accurately observed, Brown ("Industrial and Labor Relations Review," 1990, 43, 1655-1825; "RAND Journal of Economics," 1992, 23, 366-75). More productive workers self-select into jobs with performance-based pay. Consequently, workers whose pay is based on performance should earn more than those whose pay is not based on such measures. This paper adds to the literature on the subject by providing new empirical evidence for Brown's model using the National Longitudinal Surveys of Youth (NLSY) data.
Bibliography Citation
Ewing, Bradley T. "Wages and Performance-Based Pay: Evidence from the NLSY." Economics Letters 51,2 (May 1996): 241-246.
8. Ewing, Bradley T.
Payne, James E.
The Trade-Off Between Supervision and Wages: Evidence of Efficiency Wages from the NLSY
Southern Economic Journal 66,2 (October 1999): 424-432.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1057002
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Southern Economic Association
Keyword(s): Earnings; Wage Models; Wage Theory; Wages

Standard efficiency wage models suggest that workers employed in places with lower probabilities of identifying shirking will earn more, as will workers who have better alternative opportunities. This paper provides new empirical evidence in support of efficiency wage theory using the National Longitudinal Surveys of Youth data. The empirical results support the prediction of the model that workers employed in larger work groups are paid more, a finding consistent with a supervision-wage trade-off. Additional evidence supports the prediction that workers with better alternative opportunities earn more.
Bibliography Citation
Ewing, Bradley T. and James E. Payne. "The Trade-Off Between Supervision and Wages: Evidence of Efficiency Wages from the NLSY." Southern Economic Journal 66,2 (October 1999): 424-432.
9. Wunnava, Phanindra V.
Ewing, Bradley T.
Union-Nonunion Differentials and Establishment Size: Evidence from the NLSY
Journal of Labor Research 20,2 (March 1999): 177-183.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/v5u727756121r134/
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: John M. Olin Institute at George Mason University
Keyword(s): Benefits, Fringe; Firm Size; Gender Differences; Leave, Family or Maternity/Paternity; Occupational Choice; Unions; Wages

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Based on data from the National Longitudinal Surveys of Youth (NLSY), both male and female workers in larger establishments receive not only higher wages but also have a higher probability of receiving benefits than those in smaller establishments. This phenomenon reinforces the well documented size effect. This study also provides evidence of vast gender differences in estimated union effects on the different components of the compensation structure. Hence unions should not treat both genders similarly with respect to wages and benefits. Specifically, unions may be successful in attracting more female workers to join rank and file if unions could play an active role in making available maternity (paternity) leave, and also provided opportunities for women to join large establishments..
Bibliography Citation
Wunnava, Phanindra V. and Bradley T. Ewing. "Union-Nonunion Differentials and Establishment Size: Evidence from the NLSY." Journal of Labor Research 20,2 (March 1999): 177-183.
10. Wunnava, Phanindra V.
Ewing, Bradley T.
Union-Nonunion Gender Wage and Benefit Differentials across Establishment Sizes
Small Business Economics 15,1 (August 2000): 47-57.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/qp524wq23vm2216h/
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Kluwer Academic Publishers
Keyword(s): Benefits; Firm Size; Gender Differences; Leave, Family or Maternity/Paternity; Unions; Wage Differentials; Wages

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Based on data from the National Longitudinal Surveys of Youth (NLSY), both male and female workers in larger establishments receive not only higher wages but also have a higher probability of receiving benefits than those in smaller establishments. This phenomenon reinforces the well documented size effect. This study also provides evidence of vast gender differences in estimated union effects on the different components of the compensation structure. Hence unions should not treat both genders similarly with respect to wages and benefits. Specifically, unions may be successful in attracting more female workers to join rank and file if unions could play an active role in making available maternity (paternity) leave, and also provided opportunities for women to join large establishments.
Bibliography Citation
Wunnava, Phanindra V. and Bradley T. Ewing. "Union-Nonunion Gender Wage and Benefit Differentials across Establishment Sizes." Small Business Economics 15,1 (August 2000): 47-57.