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Author: Artz, Benjamin
Resulting in 9 citations.
1. Artz, Benjamin
Does the Impact of Union Experience on Job Satisfaction Differ by Gender?
Industrial and Labor Relations Review 65,2 (2012): 225-243.
Also: http://digitalcommons.ilr.cornell.edu/ilrreview/vol65/iss2/2/
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: New York State School of Industrial and Labor Relations, Cornell University
Keyword(s): Gender Differences; Job Satisfaction; Unions

The author investigates gender differences in the impact of accumulated union experience on job satisfaction. Because there are fewer women than men in both public and private sector unions, and women are disproportionately underrepresented in union leadership, their collective bargaining power is not equivalent to that of men. As a result, women’s preferences for job characteristics and benefits may be overlooked, contributing to reduced job satisfaction as their tenure in the union increases. Using the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY) panel data from 1979–2004, the author demonstrates that the accumulation of union experience negatively affects women’s job satisfaction more severely than it does men’s. This is particularly the case in private sector unions, in which women are more likely to be under-represented in both union membership and leadership positions.
Bibliography Citation
Artz, Benjamin. "Does the Impact of Union Experience on Job Satisfaction Differ by Gender?" Industrial and Labor Relations Review 65,2 (2012): 225-243.
2. Artz, Benjamin
Essays in Job Satisfaction
PhD Dissertation, The University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee, 2008.
Also: http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=1692096421&sid=1&Fmt=2&clientId=3959&RQT=309&VName=PQD
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: ProQuest Dissertations & Theses (PQDT)
Keyword(s): Benefits, Fringe; Endogeneity; Job Satisfaction; Mobility, Job; Modeling, Fixed Effects; Unions

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This dissertation includes three essays on the economics of job satisfaction. The first, "The Role of Firm Size and Performance Pay in Determining Employee Job Satisfaction", uses the Working in Britain 2000 data to analyze the impact that performance pay has on job satisfaction. The paper argues that the potential positive influences, eliciting greater effort and pay and a tighter connection to the objectives of the firm, are more likely in larger firms. The estimates therefore confirm that even though large firms are known to have lower job satisfaction, proper use of performance pay can ameliorate this otherwise negative association.

The second essay, "Fringe Benefits and Job Satisfaction?" uses waves 1996 - 2004 of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY) to study the impact that fringe benefits have on job satisfaction. Fringe benefits stand as an important part of compensation but confirming their role in determining job satisfaction has been mixed at best. The theory suggesting this role is ambiguous. Fringe benefits represent a desirable form of compensation but might result in decreased earnings and reduced job mobility. In this second essay fringe benefits are established as significant and positive determinants of job satisfaction, even after controlling for individual fixed effects and testing for the endogeneity of fringe benefits.

The final essay discusses union exposure and its impact on job satisfaction, specifically that of former union workers. The paper uses all waves of the NLSY to study how length of exposure to a union negatively impacts current job satisfaction for former union members. Furthermore, the length of accumulated time after a worker leaves a union job is positively related to job satisfaction. Therefore, unions have a lasting negative influence on the job satisfaction of workers, even after they leave the union workplace.

Bibliography Citation
Artz, Benjamin. Essays in Job Satisfaction. PhD Dissertation, The University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee, 2008..
3. Artz, Benjamin
Fringe Benefits and Job Satisfaction
International Journal of Manpower 31,6 (2010): 626-644.
Also: http://www.emeraldinsight.com/journals.htm?issn=0143-7720&volume=31&issue=6&articleid=1881477&show=abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: MCB University Press
Keyword(s): Benefits, Fringe; Endogeneity; Job Satisfaction; Modeling, Fixed Effects; Modeling, Probit

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Purpose -- The paper seeks to empirically identify the theoretically ambiguous relationship between employer fringe benefit provision and worker job satisfaction. Design/methodology/approach -- Using the five most recent waves of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, both pooled cross-section and fixed effects estimates explain the relationship between fringe benefits and job satisfaction. The potential endogenous relationship is also tested using a recursive bivariate probit procedure. Findings -- Fringe benefits are significant and positive determinants of job satisfaction. The potential endogeneity between fringe benefits and job satisfaction is not shown in this dataset while controlling for fixed effects does not remove the significant impact of fringe benefits. Research limitations/implications -- A limitation is the inability to control for total compensation within the estimations and control for wage changes as a result of fringe benefit provision. Practical implications -- Higher levels of worker job satisfaction, potentially resulting from fringe benefit provisions, have been linked to important productivity measures such as lower quit rates and absenteeism. Originality/value -- The paper is the first to study the relationship between fringe benefits and job satisfaction in detail while additionally testing for the endogeneity of the relationship and controlling for fixed effects. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Bibliography Citation
Artz, Benjamin. "Fringe Benefits and Job Satisfaction." International Journal of Manpower 31,6 (2010): 626-644.
4. Artz, Benjamin
Relative Supervisor Education and Worker Well-being
International Journal of Manpower 39,5 (2018): 731-745.
Also: https://www.emeraldinsight.com/doi/abstract/10.1108/IJM-01-2017-0022
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Emerald
Keyword(s): Educational Attainment; Job Satisfaction; Supervisor Characteristics; Well-Being

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Purpose: Less educated supervisors create worker status incongruence, a violation of social norms that signals advancement uncertainty and job ambiguity for workers, and leads to negative behavioral and well-being outcomes. The purpose of this paper is to compare education levels of supervisors with their workers and measure the correlation between relative supervisor education and worker job satisfaction.

Design/methodology/approach: Using the only wave of the 1979 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth that identifies education levels of both supervisor and worker, a series of ordered probit estimates describe the relationship between supervisor education levels and subordinate worker well-being. Extensive controls, sub-sample estimates and a control for sorting confirm the estimates.

Findings: Worker well-being is negatively correlated with having a less educated supervisor and positively correlated with having a more educated supervisor. This result is robust to a number of alternative specifications. In sub-sample estimates, workers highly placed in an organization’s hierarchy do not exhibit reduced well-being with less educated supervisors.

Bibliography Citation
Artz, Benjamin. "Relative Supervisor Education and Worker Well-being." International Journal of Manpower 39,5 (2018): 731-745.
5. Artz, Benjamin
The Role of Firm Size and Performance Pay in Determining Employee Job Satisfaction Brief: Firm Size, Performance Pay, and Job Satisfaction
Labour: Review of Labour Economics and Industrial Relations 22,2 (June 2008): 315–343.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1467-9914.2007.00398.x/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing, Inc. => Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Benefits, Fringe; Endogeneity; Job Satisfaction; Modeling, Fixed Effects; Performance pay; Unions; Wage Determination

Job satisfaction reflects the on-the-job utility of workers and has been found to influence both the behavior of workers and the productivity of firms. Performance pay remains popular and widely used to increase worker productivity and more generally align the objectives of workers and firms. Yet, its impact on job satisfaction is ambiguous. Whereas the increased earnings increase job satisfaction, the increased effort and risk decreases job satisfaction. This paper finds empirical evidence that on net performance pay increases job satisfaction but does so largely among union workers and males in larger firms. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

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Bibliography Citation
Artz, Benjamin. "The Role of Firm Size and Performance Pay in Determining Employee Job Satisfaction Brief: Firm Size, Performance Pay, and Job Satisfaction." Labour: Review of Labour Economics and Industrial Relations 22,2 (June 2008): 315–343. A.
6. Artz, Benjamin
Goodall, Amanda H.
Oswald, Andrew J.
Boss Competence and Worker Well-Being
ILR Review 70,2 (March 2017): 419-450.
Also: http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/0019793916650451
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: New York State School of Industrial and Labor Relations, Cornell University
Keyword(s): Job Satisfaction; Modeling, Instrumental Variables; Supervisor Characteristics

Nearly all workers have a supervisor or "boss." Yet little is known about how bosses influence the quality of employees' lives. This study offers new evidence. First, the authors find that a boss's technical competence is the single strongest predictor of a worker's job satisfaction. Second, they demonstrate using longitudinal data, after controlling for fixed-effects, that even if a worker stays in the same job and workplace, a rise in the competence of a supervisor is associated with an improvement in the worker's well-being. Third, the authors report a variety of robustness checks, including tentative instrumental variable results. These findings, which draw on U.S. and British data, contribute to an emerging literature on the role of "expert leaders" in organizations.
Bibliography Citation
Artz, Benjamin, Amanda H. Goodall and Andrew J. Oswald. "Boss Competence and Worker Well-Being." ILR Review 70,2 (March 2017): 419-450.
7. Artz, Benjamin
Heywood, John S.
Performance Pay and Workplace Injury: Panel Evidence
Economica 82, s1 (December 2015): 1241-1260.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/ecca.12153/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing, Inc. => Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Blue-Collar Jobs; Injuries, Workplace; Modeling, Fixed Effects; Performance pay

Using panel survey data, we show cross-sectional evidence of an elevated risk of workplace injury for those paid piece rates and bonuses. While consistent with Adam Smith's behavioural conjecture, this could simply reflect sorting across workers or firms. In response we successively control for a risk proxy, for worker fixed effects and for worker with employer match fixed effects. No previous examination has controlled for such fixed effects or examined US survey data. The estimates indicate that injury risk increases substantially when blue-collar (manual) workers become paid by piece rates and bonuses.
Bibliography Citation
Artz, Benjamin and John S. Heywood. "Performance Pay and Workplace Injury: Panel Evidence." Economica 82, s1 (December 2015): 1241-1260.
8. Artz, Benjamin
Taengnoi, Sarinda
Do Women Prefer Female Bosses?
Labour Economics 42 (October 2016): 194-202.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0927537116301129
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Gender Differences; Job Satisfaction; Supervisor Characteristics; Well-Being

The participation of women in the labor force has grown significantly over the past 50 years, and with this, women are increasingly holding managerial and supervisory positions. Yet little is known about how female supervisors impact employee well-being. Using two distinct datasets of US workers, we provide previously undocumented evidence that women are less satisfied with their jobs when they have a female boss. Male job satisfaction, by contrast, is unaffected. Crucially our study is able to control for individual worker fixed effects and to identify the impact of a change in supervisor gender on worker well-being without other alterations in the worker's job.
Bibliography Citation
Artz, Benjamin and Sarinda Taengnoi. "Do Women Prefer Female Bosses?" Labour Economics 42 (October 2016): 194-202.
9. Artz, Benjamin
Taengnoi, Sarinda
The Gender Gap in Raise Magnitudes of Hourly and Salary Workers
Journal of Labor Research 40,1 (March 2019): 84-105.
Also: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s12122-018-9277-8
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB); Gender Differences; Risk-Taking; Wage Gap; Wage Penalty/Career Penalty

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The gender gap in promotions literature typically uses survey to survey imputed hourly wage changes to measure the earnings effects of promotions alone. By distinction, we study raises with and without promotions using data within surveys that uniquely identify both the current and most recent wages of hourly workers separate from salary workers. In cross-section estimates we identify a gender gap in raise magnitude favoring men only among hourly workers who achieve promotions, but this result vanishes in fixed effects estimates. No gender gaps emerge in any other instance, including for salary workers and raises absent of promotion. We further contribute to the literature by uniquely controlling for natural ability and risk preferences of the workers, the time passed since earning the raise, and also whether the responsibility of the worker's job changed with the raise.
Bibliography Citation
Artz, Benjamin and Sarinda Taengnoi. "The Gender Gap in Raise Magnitudes of Hourly and Salary Workers." Journal of Labor Research 40,1 (March 2019): 84-105.