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Author: Blanchflower, David G.
Resulting in 3 citations.
1. Artz, Benjamin
Blanchflower, David G.
Bryson, Alex
Unions Increase Job Satisfaction in the United States
NBER Working Paper No. 28717, National Bureau of Economic Research, April 2021.
Also: https://www.nber.org/papers/w28717
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY97
Publisher: National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)
Keyword(s): Economic Changes/Recession; Job Satisfaction; Underemployment; Unions

We revisit the well-known negative association between union coverage and individuals' job satisfaction in the United States, first identified over forty years ago. We find the association has flipped since the Great Recession such that union workers are now more satisfied than their non-union counterparts. This is found to be the case for younger and older workers in the National Longitudinal Surveys of Youth of 1979 and 1997. The change is apparent when we use the panel data to account for fixed differences in those who are and are not unionized, suggesting changes in worker sorting into union status are not the reason for the change. The absence of substantial change in the union wage gap, and the stability of results when conditioning on wages, both suggest the change is not associated with changes in unions' wage bargaining. Instead, we find some diminution in unions' ability to lower quit rates – albeit confined to older workers - which is suggestive of a decline in their effectiveness in operating as a 'voice' mechanism for unionized workers. We also present evidence suggestive of unions' ability to minimize covered workers’ exposure to underemployment, a phenomenon that has negatively impacted non-union workers.
Bibliography Citation
Artz, Benjamin, David G. Blanchflower and Alex Bryson. "Unions Increase Job Satisfaction in the United States." NBER Working Paper No. 28717, National Bureau of Economic Research, April 2021.
2. Blanchflower, David G.
Lynch, Lisa M.
Training at Work: A Comparison of U.S. and British Youths
In: Training in the Private Sector. Lisa Lynch, ed. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press, 1994: pp. 233-260
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
Keyword(s): Cross-national Analysis; Job Training; NCDS - National Child Development Study (British)

This paper compares and contrasts the structures of postschool training for young non-university graduates in Britain and in the United States. We are able to utilize two unique and broadly comparable longitudinal data series on young people, the U.S. National Longitudinal Survey Youth Cohort (NLSY) and the British National Child Development Survey (NCDS). In addition, we make use of two large individual data files-the 1981 and 1989 Labour Force Surveys to determine how the labor market in the United Kingdom changed during the 1980s. We use these data to examine the early labor market experiences of young people as they make the transition from school to work
Bibliography Citation
Blanchflower, David G. and Lisa M. Lynch. "Training at Work: A Comparison of U.S. and British Youths" In: Training in the Private Sector. Lisa Lynch, ed. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press, 1994: pp. 233-260
3. Blanchflower, David G.
Lynch, Lisa M.
Training at Work: A Comparison of U.S. and British Youths
Working Paper, NBER Working Paper No. W4037, March 1, 1992.
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)
Keyword(s): Cross-national Analysis; Job Training; NCDS - National Child Development Study (British)

This paper compares and contrasts the structure of post school training for young nonuniversity graduates in Britain and the United States. We utilize two unique longitudinal surveys in these countries on young people to examine four issues: the extent of pest school training in Britain and the U.S. and the wage gains associated with it; the link between formal training and further qualifications in Britain and the return to this on wages; differentials in the training experience by gender in the two countries; and the possible implications for skill development in Britain of dismantling significant elements of the traditional apprenticeship system. Our principal findings are that non-college graduates in Britain receive much more post school training than similar youths in the United States. This training is also linked with higher national recognized qualifications. The rates of return to post school training in both countries is high. especially in the United States. The higher rates of return to training in the U.S. is consistent with underinvestment in training in the U.S.. When the sample is divided by gender, however, women in the U.S. receive more training than their British counterparts and their wages increase by a greater amount. As Britain has replaced the traditional apprenticeship system with a government-led program called Youth Training more women seem to be receiving training after school. However, far fewer young people are obtaining qualifications after their training.
Bibliography Citation
Blanchflower, David G. and Lisa M. Lynch. "Training at Work: A Comparison of U.S. and British Youths." Working Paper, NBER Working Paper No. W4037, March 1, 1992.