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Source: University of Houston
Resulting in 8 citations.
1. Akbulut-Yuksel, Mevlude
Kugler, Adriana D.
Inter-Generational Transmission of Health Status in the U.S Among Natives and Immigrants
Working Paper, Department of Economics, University of Houston, 2007
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: University of Houston
Keyword(s): Asthma; Body Mass Index (BMI); Child Health; Depression (see also CESD); Height; Immigrants; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Modeling, Fixed Effects; Mothers, Health; Obesity; Siblings; Weight

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The research on education points to significant inter-generational transmission which likely contributes to the inter-generational transmission of earnings and income. This paper addresses the question of whether another form of human capital, health, also provides similar insight in understanding mobility of earnings. Using the NLSY79, we first present new evidence on intergenerational transmission of health outcomes including weight, height, the body mass index, depression and asthma for both natives and immigrants. We show that both native and immigrant children inherit a prominent fraction of their health status from their parents. Next, we also find that mother's education decreases child's weight and the body mass index for natives, while single motherhood increases weight and BMI of children for both natives and immigrants. Taken together, these findings suggest that along with inter-generational correlation in education, persistence in health also contributes to the inter-generational transmission of economics.
Bibliography Citation
Akbulut-Yuksel, Mevlude and Adriana D. Kugler. "Inter-Generational Transmission of Health Status in the U.S Among Natives and Immigrants." Working Paper, Department of Economics, University of Houston, 2007.
2. Antel, John J.
Inter-Generational Transfer of Welfare Dependency
Working Paper, University of Houston, 1988
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: University of Houston
Keyword(s): Heterogeneity; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Mothers and Daughters; Transfers, Public; Welfare

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper examines the questions of whether a mother's welfare receipt increases the future dependency of her children and whether the welfare system works to stimulate the dependency of future generations. Parameter estimates reported here suggest significant inter-generational effects. The sample is comprised of young women from the NLSY and their mothers. After controlling for observed and unobserved heterogeneity, a mother's welfare participation is found to stimulate her daughter's later months on welfare.
Bibliography Citation
Antel, John J. "Inter-Generational Transfer of Welfare Dependency." Working Paper, University of Houston, 1988.
3. Antel, John J.
Mother's Welfare Dependency Effects on Daughter's Early Fertility and Fertility Out of Wedlock
Working Paper, University of Houston, 1988
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: University of Houston
Keyword(s): Childbearing; Fertility; Geographical Variation; Heterogeneity; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Mothers and Daughters; Simultaneity; Welfare

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Parameter estimates suggest that a mother's welfare participation increases her daughter's early fertility and early fertility out of wedlock. Early fertility is defined as first birth before age twenty-one. Using data from the NLSY, mother's welfare participation and daughter's fertility are simultaneously modeled to avoid any bias derived from unobserved family-specific heterogeneity. While the welfare system affects a young girl's fertility predominately through the dependency of her mother, some small direct effect of state guarantee rates on illegitimate births is also indicated.
Bibliography Citation
Antel, John J. "Mother's Welfare Dependency Effects on Daughter's Early Fertility and Fertility Out of Wedlock." Working Paper, University of Houston, 1988.
4. Daundasekara, Sajeevika Saumali
Effects of Immigration Status and Maternal Health Behaviors on Gestational Weight Gain and Adherence to Institute of Medicine Gestational Weight Gain Recommendations
Ph.D. Dissertation, Department of Health and Human Performance, University of Houston, 2018.
Also: https://uh-ir.tdl.org/uh-ir/handle/10657/3094
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: University of Houston
Keyword(s): Gestation/Gestational weight gain; Immigrants; Mothers, Health; Obesity; Weight

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Gestational weight gain (GWG) is an important consideration during pregnancy as excess weight gains could lead to adverse health conditions in both mother and the child. Immigration status is a potential risk factor of excess GWG. It is important to understand the relationship between immigration status and GWG to design better interventions to control excess GWG. Therefore, the objectives of the current study were 1) to understand the differences between the first and second generation immigrants and non-immigrants with respect to the socio-demographic characteristics and maternal behaviors, 2) to understand whether immigration status is associated with the total GWG and the risk of excess GWG, 3) to determine the socio-demographic and maternal behavior profile of women exceeding the GWG recommendations. The study was conducted as a secondary data analysis using the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979.
Bibliography Citation
Daundasekara, Sajeevika Saumali. Effects of Immigration Status and Maternal Health Behaviors on Gestational Weight Gain and Adherence to Institute of Medicine Gestational Weight Gain Recommendations. Ph.D. Dissertation, Department of Health and Human Performance, University of Houston, 2018..
5. Gregory, Paul R.
Thomas, R. William
An Eclectic Model of Fertility: Economic, Attitudinal, and Demographic Factors
Working Paper #1, Fertility, Education, and Labor Force Project, University of Houston, Houston TX, 1975
Cohort(s): Mature Women
Publisher: University of Houston
Keyword(s): Chicago-Columbia Fertility; Family Income; Family Size; Fertility; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Occupational Status; Racial Differences

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The authors examine fertility determinants of married women (30-44) with spouse present. First, findings show economic variables are significant; however, non-economic variables dominate the explanation of variation in complete fertility. Second, evidence is lacking of a strong positive income effect on complete family size; however, there is substantial evidence of price effects on fertility. Third, wife's age at marriage is the single most important factor in the analysis, and attitudes toward children have a substantial effect. Finally, being black has an impact on family size in that blacks have more children. The hypothesis that completed family size varies directly with relative intergenerational income is not supported by the results.
Bibliography Citation
Gregory, Paul R. and R. William Thomas. "An Eclectic Model of Fertility: Economic, Attitudinal, and Demographic Factors." Working Paper #1, Fertility, Education, and Labor Force Project, University of Houston, Houston TX, 1975.
6. Gregory, Paul R.
Thomas, R. William
Fertility Behavior of Black and White Families: Some Evidence from the NLS
Fertility, Education, and Labor Force Project, Working Paper #2. Houston, TX: University of Houston, 1975
Cohort(s): Mature Women
Publisher: University of Houston
Keyword(s): Behavior; Black Family; Chicago-Columbia Fertility; Family Income; Family Size; Fertility; Racial Differences

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This analysis estimates separate black-white models of fertility using an expanded version of the Chicago-Columbia fertility model. Attitudes toward children (ATC) do not significantly affect black families; however, white families with positive ATC have larger families than those with negative ATCs. The husband's education exerts little effect on black fertility; however, it exerts a strong negative impact on white fertility. For couples without children, involuntary sterility and lack of contraception have a greater incidence among blacks. Income also plays a more important role in determining blacks not having children than black family size. Finally, black-white endowments account for close to one half of the differential; coefficient difference and an unexplained residual accounts for the remainder. This finding suggests that if blacks were to achieve economic parity with whites, only one half of the fertility differential would disappear.
Bibliography Citation
Gregory, Paul R. and R. William Thomas. "Fertility Behavior of Black and White Families: Some Evidence from the NLS." Fertility, Education, and Labor Force Project, Working Paper #2. Houston, TX: University of Houston, 1975.
7. Juhn, Chinhui
Rubinstein, Yona
Zuppann, Charles Andrew
The Quantity-Quality Tradeoff and the Formation of Cognitive and Non-cognitive Skills
Working Paper, University of Houston, October 2012 [Updated November 2014]
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: University of Houston
Keyword(s): Age at First Birth; Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Birth Order; Educational Attainment; Family Size; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Labor Force Participation; Noncognitive Skills; Parental Investments; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Pearlin Mastery Scale; Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES) (see Self-Esteem); Siblings

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

We estimate the impact of increases in family size on childhood and adult outcomes using matched mother-child data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. We use two approaches: using twin births as exogenous shocks to family size and utilizing the precise timing of family expansion to separate out family size increases from total family size effects. We find evidence that families face a substantial quantity-quality tradeoff: increases in family size decrease childhood cognitive abilities, decrease parental investment, decrease educational attainment, and decrease measures of adulthood non-cognitive abilities.
Bibliography Citation
Juhn, Chinhui, Yona Rubinstein and Charles Andrew Zuppann. "The Quantity-Quality Tradeoff and the Formation of Cognitive and Non-cognitive Skills." Working Paper, University of Houston, October 2012 [Updated November 2014].
8. Lehmann, Jee-Yeon K.
Nuevo-Chiquero, Ana
Vidal-Fernández, Marian
Birth Order Differences in Early Inputs and Outcomes
Working Paper, Department of Economics, University of Houston, March 2013
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: University of Houston
Keyword(s): Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Birth Order; Breastfeeding; Educational Attainment; Home Environment; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Motor and Social Development (MSD); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT); Pre-natal Care/Exposure; Racial Differences; Self-Perception Profile for Children (SPPC)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

We examine within-family differences in pre- and early postnatal investments as potential explanations for the “birth order effect” – significant differences in the educational and labor market outcomes across children of varying birth orders. Taking advantage of the rich information on in utero and early childhood conditions in the Children of the NLSY79, we find that, within the same household, siblings of higher birth order experience a lower reduction in cigarette usage during pregnancy, are breastfed less often, and experience less cognitive stimulation and emotional support at ages 0 to 1. Next, we test for the presence of birth order effects in early cognitive/non-cognitive test scores and educational attainment and examine whether these differences can be explained by variations in prenatal and early childhood inputs. While we do find a significant negative relationship between birth order and early test scores as well as educational attainment, these effects are robust to controlling for variations in early childhood factors.
Bibliography Citation
Lehmann, Jee-Yeon K., Ana Nuevo-Chiquero and Marian Vidal-Fernández. "Birth Order Differences in Early Inputs and Outcomes." Working Paper, Department of Economics, University of Houston, March 2013.