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Author: Daundasekara, Sajeevika Saumali
Resulting in 2 citations.
1. Daundasekara, Sajeevika Saumali
Effects of Immigration Status and Maternal Health Behaviors on Gestational Weight Gain and Adherence to Institute of Medicine Gestational Weight Gain Recommendations
Ph.D. Dissertation, Department of Health and Human Performance, University of Houston, 2018.
Also: https://uh-ir.tdl.org/uh-ir/handle/10657/3094
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: University of Houston
Keyword(s): Gestation/Gestational weight gain; Immigrants; Mothers, Health; Obesity; Weight

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Gestational weight gain (GWG) is an important consideration during pregnancy as excess weight gains could lead to adverse health conditions in both mother and the child. Immigration status is a potential risk factor of excess GWG. It is important to understand the relationship between immigration status and GWG to design better interventions to control excess GWG. Therefore, the objectives of the current study were 1) to understand the differences between the first and second generation immigrants and non-immigrants with respect to the socio-demographic characteristics and maternal behaviors, 2) to understand whether immigration status is associated with the total GWG and the risk of excess GWG, 3) to determine the socio-demographic and maternal behavior profile of women exceeding the GWG recommendations. The study was conducted as a secondary data analysis using the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979.
Bibliography Citation
Daundasekara, Sajeevika Saumali. Effects of Immigration Status and Maternal Health Behaviors on Gestational Weight Gain and Adherence to Institute of Medicine Gestational Weight Gain Recommendations. Ph.D. Dissertation, Department of Health and Human Performance, University of Houston, 2018..
2. Daundasekara, Sajeevika Saumali
O'Connor, Daniel P.
Cardoso, Jodi Berger
Ledoux, Tracey
Hernandez, Daphne C.
Association between Generational Status and Smoking Behaviors before and during Pregnancy among Hispanic Women
Addictive Behaviors published online (11 January 2020): 106310.
Also: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0306460319310780
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Hispanic Studies; Immigrants; Pre/post Natal Behavior; Pregnancy and Pregnancy Outcomes; Smoking (see Cigarette Use)

Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine whether immigration generational status predicts maternal smoking behaviors before and during pregnancy among Hispanic women.

Methods: Data on pregnancies in National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 were used. Current study sample consists of Hispanic women (15-24 years) reporting pregnancy between 1979 and 2014 (n = 616). Data on birthplaces of the respondent and their parents were used to determine generation status. Maternal smoking behaviors before and during pregnancy were self-reported. Data were analyzed using weighted covariate-adjusted logistic regression models.

Results: There were 24% first-generation, 20% second-generation, and 56% third or higher generation Hispanic women in the sample. Majority of participants were married (72%), with a high school degree or more (69%), and of Mexican origin (56%). After controlling for covariates, first generation Hispanic women had lower likelihood of smoking prior to (OR=0.40, p =0.009) and during pregnancy (OR=0.35, p =0.007) compared to third or higher generation women. The second-generation women had lower likelihood of smoking during pregnancy (OR=0.46, p =0.038) compared to third or higher generation women.

Bibliography Citation
Daundasekara, Sajeevika Saumali, Daniel P. O'Connor, Jodi Berger Cardoso, Tracey Ledoux and Daphne C. Hernandez. "Association between Generational Status and Smoking Behaviors before and during Pregnancy among Hispanic Women." Addictive Behaviors published online (11 January 2020): 106310.