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Source: Social Statistics Section, American Statistical Association
Resulting in 2 citations.
1. Chirikos, Thomas N.
Nestel, Gilbert
Economic Consequences of Poor Health, by Race and Sex
Proceedings, Social Statistics Section, American Statistical Association (1982): 473-477
Cohort(s): Mature Women, Older Men
Publisher: American Statistical Association
Keyword(s): Behavior; Earnings; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Labor Market Outcomes; Selectivity Bias/Selection Bias; Wages; Work Hours

This paper draws on data collected in the NLS of Older Men and Mature Women to evaluate the relationship between health status and labor market outcomes. The authors recognize that the same health problem can have different economic consequences for different subgroups of individuals. The principal objective of this study is to quantify these intergroup differences by computing earnings losses stemming from the impact of poor health on hours worked and wage rates of white and black men and women. A unique feature of this analysis is the use of a health measure that is not behavioral and is constructed from responses to questions about functional limitations (e.g., walking and lifting) and signs and symptoms of illness (e.g., aches and nervousness). Maximum likelihood techniques and OLS are used to estimate the equations and attention is also given to possible selectivity bias in wage equations.
Bibliography Citation
Chirikos, Thomas N. and Gilbert Nestel. "Economic Consequences of Poor Health, by Race and Sex." Proceedings, Social Statistics Section, American Statistical Association (1982): 473-477.
2. Kohen, Andrew I.
Roderick, Roger D.
Causes of Differentials in Early Labor Market Success Among Young Women
Proceedings, Social Statistics Section, American Statistical Association (1972): 329-334
Cohort(s): Young Women
Publisher: American Statistical Association
Keyword(s): Employment; Family Influences; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; I.Q.; Schooling; Siblings; Wages

This paper is part of a larger research effort to identify the causes of differentials in early labor market success among youth. Here, we are primarily interested in: (1) the effect of education, independent of ability, on early labor market success; and (2) white-black differentials in the determinants of early labor market success, where our measure of success is hourly earnings. Our results suggest that education is a more important influence on earnings among white women in typically female occupations than among those in atypically female occupations, for whom ability is a more important factor.
Bibliography Citation
Kohen, Andrew I. and Roger D. Roderick. "Causes of Differentials in Early Labor Market Success Among Young Women." Proceedings, Social Statistics Section, American Statistical Association (1972): 329-334.