Search Results

Source: Social Currents
Resulting in 2 citations.
1. Fernandes, April
How Far Up the River? Criminal Justice Contact and Health Outcomes
Social Currents 7,1 (February 2020): 29-45.
Also: https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/2329496519870216
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Arrests; Criminal Justice System; Health, Mental; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Incarceration/Jail

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Research has shown negative health outcomes from felony imprisonment. The conditions that create and exacerbate physical and mental health outcomes on the felony side--exposure to disease, lack of health care, and stress--are reflected in other less severe forms of criminal justice contact. Given that the low-level contact has grown along with prison incarceration, the health effects of less severe forms of criminal justice contact should be investigated. Using 10 waves from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 ([NLSY97), this project explores the impact on self-reported physical and mental health from the continuum of contact, namely, an arrest, conviction, and jail sentence. The results show that low-level forms of contact negatively affect both physical and mental health throughout the continuum of contact. The role of the type of conviction is investigated, providing a more nuanced understanding of how points of contact operate on essential outcomes such as physical and mental health.
Bibliography Citation
Fernandes, April. "How Far Up the River? Criminal Justice Contact and Health Outcomes." Social Currents 7,1 (February 2020): 29-45.
2. Leibbrand, Christine
Unequal Opportunity? Racial, Ethnic, and Gender Disparities in the Returns to Internal U.S. Migration
Social Currents 7,1 (1 February 2020): 46-70.
Also: https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/2329496519869339
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Economic Well-Being; Ethnic Differences; Gender Differences; Geocoded Data; Migration; Racial Differences

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Internal U.S. migration plays an important role in increasing individuals' access to economic and social opportunities. At the same time, race, ethnicity, and gender have frequently shaped the opportunities and obstacles individuals face. It is therefore likely that the returns to internal migration are also shaped by race, ethnicity, and gender, though we have relatively little knowledge of whether this is the case for contemporary internal U.S. migration. To explore this possibility, I use restricted, geocoded National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 data from 1979 to 2012. I find that white men gain the most economically from migrating, relative to black and Latino men. For women, migration is associated with stable or narrower racial and ethnic disparities in economic outcomes, with Latina women experiencing the largest economic benefits associated with migration and with black and white women exhibiting comparable economic returns to migration. Together, these findings indicate that migration may maintain or even narrow racial/ethnic disparities in economic outcomes among women, but widen them among men.
Bibliography Citation
Leibbrand, Christine. "Unequal Opportunity? Racial, Ethnic, and Gender Disparities in the Returns to Internal U.S. Migration." Social Currents 7,1 (1 February 2020): 46-70.