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Source: Families in Society
Resulting in 13 citations.
1. Caputo, Richard K.
Assets and Economic Mobility in a Youth Cohort, 1985-1997
Families in Society: The Journal of Contemporary Social Services 84,1 (January 2003): 51-62.
Also: http://www.familiesinsociety.org/ShowAbstract.asp?docid=73
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Manticore Publishers
Keyword(s): Assets; Economic Well-Being; Mobility; Mobility, Economic; Retirement; Savings; Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study examined the role of assets in economic mobility within a youth cohort (N = 4,467) between 1985 and 1997. Increasing percentages of poor and affluent youth resided in families with no change in economic status while increasing percentages of middle-class youth resided in families experiences downward economic mobility. The rate of economic stasis of youth living in affluent families was about three times that of those in poor families. Length of time of asset ownership influenced economic mobility beyond that of background, sociodemographic, psychological, and other cumulative correlates. In particular, IRAs and tax-deferred annuities were related to positive economic mobility. Robust indicators of positive economic mobility included being a college graduate, number of siblings in family of origin, number of years of full-time employment, number of years living in household where someone received either AFDC/TANF or SSI, and locus of control. Robust indicators of downward economic mobility included age of respondent, number of years married, and being Catholic. Finally, neither sex nor race/ethnicity increased the explanatory power of positive economic mobility beyond that of other correlates regardless of asset ownership. Discussion also includes public and private initiatives to expand IRAs into individual Development Accounts and to encourage employers to offer (and workers to take advantage of) tax-deferred annuities, particularly for low-income workers.
Bibliography Citation
Caputo, Richard K. "Assets and Economic Mobility in a Youth Cohort, 1985-1997." Families in Society: The Journal of Contemporary Social Services 84,1 (January 2003): 51-62.
2. Caputo, Richard K.
Credit Card and Mortgage Debt: A Panel Study, 2004 and 2008
Families in Society: The Journal of Contemporary Social Services 93,1 (2012): 11-21.
Also: http://alliance1.metapress.com/content/u53274563v305337/
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Alliance for Children and Families
Keyword(s): Attitudes; Credit/Credit Constraint; Debt/Borrowing; Educational Attainment; Marital Status; Socioeconomic Status (SES)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Relying on data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1979 cohort, this article examines the pervasiveness and depth of credit card and mortgage debt in 2004 and 2008 (N = 3,966). Findings indicate that (a) significant majorities experienced either credit card debt, mortgage debt, or both; (b) debtors increased as a proportion of the population between 2004 and 2008; (c) mortgage-related debt, but not credit card debt, was disproportionately distributed along sociodemographic characteristics (married, more affluent, and more educated) and by attitudinal dispositions (locus of control and self-esteem); and (d) separated/widowed/divorced persons and never married persons were more economically vulnerable, having higher mortgage debt-to-income ratios of more than 1.5 to 2 times their income.
Bibliography Citation
Caputo, Richard K. "Credit Card and Mortgage Debt: A Panel Study, 2004 and 2008." Families in Society: The Journal of Contemporary Social Services 93,1 (2012): 11-21.
3. Caputo, Richard K.
Depression and Health among Grandmothers Co-Residing with Grandchildren in Two Cohorts of Women
Families in Society: The Journal of Contemporary Human Services 82,5 (September-October 2001): 473-483.
Also: http://www.familiesinsociety.org/ShowAbstract.asp?docid=166
Cohort(s): Mature Women, Young Women
Publisher: Manticore Publishers
Keyword(s): Coresidence; Depression (see also CESD); Grandchildren; Grandmothers; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper examined depression and health of grandmothers who co-resided with grandchildren in 1997 in two cohorts of women, one aged 30-44 in 1967 (N= 2,080), and the other aged 14-24 in 1968 (N= 1,708). Co-resident grandmothers in both cohorts were more likely than other mothers to have higher levels of depression and about one-fifth were likely to exhibit levels high enough to place them "at risk" for clinical depression. Co-residency, however, was not found to be a good predictor of either level of depression or changes in the level of depression, but prior levels of depression were positively related to changes in the level of depression among mothers in general when controlling for current or previous co-residency. Health status was found to be a good predictor of depression when accounting for co-residency and work effort among other factors.
Bibliography Citation
Caputo, Richard K. "Depression and Health among Grandmothers Co-Residing with Grandchildren in Two Cohorts of Women." Families in Society: The Journal of Contemporary Human Services 82,5 (September-October 2001): 473-483.
4. Caputo, Richard K.
Economic Well-Being in a Youth Cohort
Families in Society: The Journal of Contemporary Human Services 79,1 (January 1998): 83-92.
Also: http://www.familiesinsociety.org/ShowAbstract.asp?docid=1802
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Manticore Publishers
Keyword(s): Economic Well-Being; Education; Ethnic Differences; Gender Differences; Hispanics; Marital Status; Racial Differences; Self-Esteem

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

COPYRIGHT 1998 Families International Inc. Using multiple regression analysis on data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, the author found that the level of economic well-being varied by sex and race or ethnicity. Education, hours worked, and marital status were the most consistent predictors of economic well-being, depending on the sex and race or ethnicity of respondents in 1992 and 1985, and self-esteem was also a consistent predictor among Hispanic men and White women in 1992. Nonetheless, the influence of education on economic well-being declined between 1985 and 1992 for all groups except White women, while the influence of hours worked declined for all groups except Hispanic women and Black men. The findings provided empirical evidence for the reported generalized anxiety in regard to people's ability to influence their economic well-being.
Bibliography Citation
Caputo, Richard K. "Economic Well-Being in a Youth Cohort." Families in Society: The Journal of Contemporary Human Services 79,1 (January 1998): 83-92.
5. Caputo, Richard K.
Family Poverty and Public Dependency
Families in Society: The Journal of Contemporary Human Services 78,1 (January-February 1997): 13-25.
Also: http://www.familiesinsociety.org/ShowAbstract.asp?docid=733
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Manticore Publishers
Keyword(s): Age at First Intercourse; Aid for Families with Dependent Children (AFDC); Education; Family Characteristics; Food Stamps (see Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program); Gender Differences; Marital Status; Poverty; Self-Esteem; Unemployment Compensation; Welfare

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The author used data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, survey year 1993, to identify determinants of public benefits among families above and below the official poverty line in 1992. The relative effects of sociodemographic and attitudinal/cultural characteristics were assessed to determine the likelihood of male and female respondents receiving Aid to Families with Depend dent Children, food stamps, and/or unemployment-compensation benefits. Results indicated that many sociodemographic characteristics exerted similar influence on men and women regarding the likelihood of using public assistance regardless of poverty status. Marital status and education were notable exceptions. Findings suggested that men and women used public assistance as a buffer against economic vulnerability and that increased education might be a less effective means to self-suffciency than commonly thought. Antipoverty policy implications are discussed.
Bibliography Citation
Caputo, Richard K. "Family Poverty and Public Dependency." Families in Society: The Journal of Contemporary Human Services 78,1 (January-February 1997): 13-25.
6. Caputo, Richard K.
Grandmothers and Coresident Grandchildren
Families in Society: The Journal of Contemporary Human Services 80,2 (March-April 1999): 120-126.
Also: http://www.familiesinsociety.org/ShowAbstract.asp?docid=654
Cohort(s): Mature Women
Publisher: Manticore Publishers
Keyword(s): Coresidence; Grandchildren; Grandmothers; Income; Life Course; Marital Status

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This article reports findings of a national study examining characteristics of coresident grandmothers and their grandchildren between 1967 and 1992 (n = 1099). Findings suggested that coresident grandmotherhood may be more prevalent than previously Indicated, and of longer duration, over the life course. Among the study sample of ever coresident grandmothers (n = 753), age, income status (having an income less than 50% of the median family income), and race were found to be negatively correlated with coresidency in 1992, while number of children and years of coresident grandparenthood were found to be positively related to coresidency. Among the study sample of coresident families in 1992 (n = 285), age and income status were found to be negatively correlated with the likelihood of living in a three-generation household while number of coresident grandchildren and marital status (being single) were found to be positively correlated with three-generation households. In addition, sizable minorities of both three- and skipped-generation households had tow income. Policy and program implications are discussed.
Bibliography Citation
Caputo, Richard K. "Grandmothers and Coresident Grandchildren." Families in Society: The Journal of Contemporary Human Services 80,2 (March-April 1999): 120-126.
7. Caputo, Richard K.
Parent Religiosity, Family Processes, and Adolescent Outcomes
Families in Society: The Journal of Contemporary Social Services 85, 4 (October/December 2004): 495-510.
Also: http://www.familiesinsociety.org/ShowAbstract.asp?docid=1837
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Manticore Publishers
Keyword(s): Adolescent Behavior; Delinquency/Gang Activity; Health, Mental; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Parental Influences; Peers/Peer influence/Peer relations; Religious Influences; Social Influences; Substance Use

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study examined the effects of parent religiosity, family processes, and peer influences on adolescent behavior in light of social control and social learning theories. Data were obtained from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1997. Findings of the study sample of 1,911 adolescents indicated that parent religiosity was positively associated with good health and higher levels of education, while inversely related to substance abuse. Adolescents with authoritarian parents had higher levels of delinquency, worse health, and worse mental health than those with permissive parents. Adolescents with uninvolved parents completed fewer years of schooling. Compared with parental religiosity and family processes, peer influences had the most influential effects on delinquency, substance abuse, and, to a lesser extent, mental health.
Bibliography Citation
Caputo, Richard K. "Parent Religiosity, Family Processes, and Adolescent Outcomes." Families in Society: The Journal of Contemporary Social Services 85, 4 (October/December 2004): 495-510.
8. Caputo, Richard K.
Prevalence and Patterns of Earned Income Tax Credit Use Among Eligible Tax-Filing Families: A Panel Study, 1999-2005
Families in Society: The Journal of Contemporary Social Services 91,1 (January 2010): 8-15.
Also: http://www.familiesinsociety.org/ShowAbstract.asp?docid=3950
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Manticore Publishers
Keyword(s): Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC); Family Income; Food Stamps (see Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program); Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP, formerly Food Stamps); Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Use of the EITC is increasingly important for eligible individuals and families in light of changes to public policies and welfare programs, such as with PRWORA and TANF. Relying on National Longitudinal Survey data over a 7-year study period, this study shows that about one third of those in their prime working years are likely to be classified as working poor. Despite that striking percentage, low-income, prime-age working adults have low EITC take-up rates (less than 20% of EITC-eligible families filed for the credit) despite federal, state, and private outreach efforts. This was found to be the case even for groups considered less economically vulnerable or in need of social protections, such as men in general and married persons. Additional direct practice, advocacy, and policy goals aimed at increasing the take-up rate for the EITC are identified. Social workers and other helping professionals would do well by their working-poor clientele to be knowledgeable about the EITC program, inquire about tax-filing status as part of routine data collection, and encourage those EITC-eligible nonfilers to file. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Bibliography Citation
Caputo, Richard K. "Prevalence and Patterns of Earned Income Tax Credit Use Among Eligible Tax-Filing Families: A Panel Study, 1999-2005." Families in Society: The Journal of Contemporary Social Services 91,1 (January 2010): 8-15.
9. Caputo, Richard K.
Receipt of Child Support by Working Single Women
Families in Society: The Journal of Contemporary Human Services 77,10 (December 1996): 615-625.
Also: http://www.familiesinsociety.org/ShowAbstract.asp?docid=982
Cohort(s): Young Women
Publisher: Manticore Publishers
Keyword(s): Child Support; Divorce; Education; Marital Status; Maternal Employment; Women

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using logistic regression, the author found that sociodemographic factors, particularly race, education, and number of children/young adults, more than attitudinal factors, distinguished recipients of child support from nonrecipient among formerly married working mothers m 1988 and 1991. In 199l, for formerly married mothers, child-care affinity was the only attitudinal characteristics associated with the likelihood of receiving child support. Because of the small sample sizes, fir clings about never married working mothers were more ambiguous. Policy and practice implications are discussed.
Bibliography Citation
Caputo, Richard K. "Receipt of Child Support by Working Single Women." Families in Society: The Journal of Contemporary Human Services 77,10 (December 1996): 615-625.
10. Caputo, Richard K.
The Availability of Traditional and Family-Friendly Employee Benefits among a Cohort of Young Women, 1968-1995
Families in Society: The Journal of Contemporary Human Services 81,4 (July-August 2000): 422-436.
Also: http://www.familiesinsociety.org/ShowAbstract.asp?docid=1037
Cohort(s): Young Women
Publisher: Manticore Publishers
Keyword(s): Benefits; Employment; Employment, History; Job Training

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Based on a nationally representative sample of young women who ever worked between 1968 and 1995 (N = 2,594), findings of a study on the availability of traditional and family-friendly employee benefits are presented. The highest concentrations (70% to 95%) of women held jobs with traditional benefits such as medical coverage, life insurance, and retirement pensions, while the proportions holding jobs with family-friendly benefits such as paid and unpaid maternity leave and flexible work hours were about half that or less. In any given survey year, between 9% and 11% of working women held jobs without benefits, while, over their work histories, 39% had held at least one job without benefits. The effects of 10 correlates on the number of years working women held jobs with specific employee benefits were also assessed. Correlates included age; highest grade completed; number of employers; number of children ever had; race; and years of full-time employment, marriage, public assistance, private-sector employment, and union membership. A positive relationship was found between full-time employment and nearly all employee benefits, while number of children had no effect on all but one benefit, flexible menu of benefits. Most significant, race was found to affect whether working women ever held jobs with certain employee benefits, as well as the number of years they were likely to hold such jobs. Despite longer full-time work histories, Black women were less likely than White women to have jobs with job-related training programs and with several family-friendly benefits. Implications for retaining principles of affirmative actions, workplace strategies, and other policies are discussed.
Bibliography Citation
Caputo, Richard K. "The Availability of Traditional and Family-Friendly Employee Benefits among a Cohort of Young Women, 1968-1995." Families in Society: The Journal of Contemporary Human Services 81,4 (July-August 2000): 422-436.
11. Caputo, Richard K.
Working and Poor: A Panel Study of Maturing Adults in the U.S.
Families in Society: The Journal of Contemporary Human Services 88,3 (July-September 2007): 351-359.
Also: http://www.familiesinsociety.org/ShowAbstract.asp?docid=3644
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Manticore Publishers
Keyword(s): Ethnic Differences; Family Income; Gender Differences; Poverty; Racial Differences; Social Environment; Socioeconomic Factors

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study uses data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth and highlights the extent of poverty and working poverty between 1986 and 2004 (N = 5,164). Over one third (34.2%) of the study sample lived in a poor family at least one year, and nearly one fourth (24.2%) lived in a working poor family at least one year. In addition, almost three fourths (70.1%) of those who lived in a poor family at least one year also lived at least one year in a working poor family. Differences were found by gender and race/ethnicity. Findings suggest that poverty as a social problem is better formulated in terms of working rather than nonworking poverty and that gender and race/ethnicity disparities are prevalent. Policy options, such as expansion of the earned income tax credit and implementation of a basic income guarantee, are explored. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

Copyright of Families in Society is the property of Alliance for Children and Families and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts)

Bibliography Citation
Caputo, Richard K. "Working and Poor: A Panel Study of Maturing Adults in the U.S." Families in Society: The Journal of Contemporary Human Services 88,3 (July-September 2007): 351-359.
12. Smith-McKeever, T. Chedgzsey
Falconnier, Lydia
Gao, Weihua
African American and White Mothers' Substance Abuse, Depression, and Criminality as Risk Factors for Child Behavior Problems
Families in Society: The Journal of Contemporary Social Services 92,1 (January 2011): 63-68.
Also: http://www.familiesinsociety.org/ArticleArchive/2011/92-1_smith-mckeever.pdf
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Alliance for Children and Families
Keyword(s): Addiction; Age at First Birth; Alcohol Use; Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Behavioral Problems; Black Family; Black Studies; Depression (see also CESD); Drug Use; First Birth; Health, Mental; Risk-Taking; Socioeconomic Status (SES); Substance Use

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study, using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, examines the correlation among maternal substance abuse, depression, and criminality and their impact on child behavior problems, using a sample of African American and White mothers. Results show that maternal depression is the strongest predictor of child behavior problems. Race was significantly associated with income, a mother's age at the time of her first child's birth, and depression. Implications for practice include the need for practitioners to prioritize the treatment of maternal depression when working with children who have behavior problems and to not look at race as a cultural descriptor alone but rather to consider how it may be associated with other risk factors for child behavior problems. (Journal abstract)
Bibliography Citation
Smith-McKeever, T. Chedgzsey, Lydia Falconnier and Weihua Gao. "African American and White Mothers' Substance Abuse, Depression, and Criminality as Risk Factors for Child Behavior Problems." Families in Society: The Journal of Contemporary Social Services 92,1 (January 2011): 63-68.
13. Zhan, Min
Assets, Human Capital Development, and Economic Mobility of Single Mothers
Families in Society 88,4 (October-December 2007): 605-615.
Also: http://www.familiesinsociety.org/ShowAbstract.asp?docid=3683
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Manticore Publishers
Keyword(s): Assets; Educational Status; Home Ownership; Mobility, Economic; Mothers; Parents, Single; Training, On-the-Job; Work Experience

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study examines the relationships of single mothers' assets (home ownership, bank account ownership, automobile ownership, and net worth) and human capital development (educational advancement, work hours, and job-related training) to their economic mobility. Analysis of data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY79) indicates factors that could help improve the upward economic mobility of single mothers include their assets, educational status and advancement, and work experience. Mothers' assets were also positively related to their educational advancement, job training participation, and work hours. Furthermore, it appears that the relationship between mother's assets (automobile ownership and net worth) with economic mobility was partially mediated by work experience. These results support investment strategies to enhance the long-term economic well-being of single mothers. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

Copyright of Families in Society is the property of Alliance for Children & Families and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts)

Bibliography Citation
Zhan, Min. "Assets, Human Capital Development, and Economic Mobility of Single Mothers." Families in Society 88,4 (October-December 2007): 605-615.