Search Results

Author: Caputo, Richard K.
Resulting in 59 citations.
1. Caputo, Richard K.
Adolescent Sexual Debut: A Multi-System Perspective of Ethnic and Racial Differences
Journal of Human Behavior in the Social Environment 19,4 (September 2009): 330-358.
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Routledge ==> Taylor & Francis (1998)
Keyword(s): Age at First Intercourse; Delinquency/Gang Activity; Ethnic Differences; Family Influences; Gender Differences; Peers/Peer influence/Peer relations; Racial Differences; Religious Influences

Data from the 1997 cohort of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth were used to assess the association between family, self, proximate extra-familial, and distal extra-familial system factors and abstinence/virginity and age of first sexual intercourse by ethnicity and race (N = 1,854). Findings show how and in what circumstances measures associated with these four factors vary for Black, White, and Hispanic youth. Findings point to the robustness of class and gender for each ethnic-racial group on timing of sexual initiation and of delinquency and negative peer relations on abstinence among Black and White youth and of religious affiliation among Hispanic youth. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Bibliography Citation
Caputo, Richard K. "Adolescent Sexual Debut: A Multi-System Perspective of Ethnic and Racial Differences." Journal of Human Behavior in the Social Environment 19,4 (September 2009): 330-358. .
2. Caputo, Richard K.
Adult Daughters as Parental Caregivers: Rational Actors versus Rational Agents
Journal of Family and Economic Issues 23,1 (Spring 2002): 27-50.
Also: http://ipsapp009.lwwonline.com/content/getfile/4842/9/2/fulltext.pdf
Cohort(s): Young Women
Publisher: Plenum Publishing Corporation
Keyword(s): Age and Ageing; Financial Assistance; Home Environment; Inheritance; Parent-Child Relationship/Closeness

Using logistic regression analyses on a sub-sample (n = 611) of the National Longitudinal Survey, Young Women's Cohort, the study found that inheritance-related factors added no explanatory power to other factors influencing the likelihood of adult daughters providing personal care or doing household chores for their aging parents, suggesting the motivational primacy of adherence to social norms. The study also found that inheritance-related factors increased the likelihood of providing financial assistance beyond that of other factors, suggesting the primacy of self-interest when money transactions are concerned. This is an important study because it offers insights into developing and implementing public and private incentives and policies to ensure an adequate supply of informal caregivers as baby boomers enter their twilight years. Copyright © 2002 Human Sciences Press, Inc.
Bibliography Citation
Caputo, Richard K. "Adult Daughters as Parental Caregivers: Rational Actors versus Rational Agents." Journal of Family and Economic Issues 23,1 (Spring 2002): 27-50.
3. Caputo, Richard K.
Age-Condensed and Age-Gapped Families: Coresidency with Elderly Parents and Relatives in a Mature Women's Cohort, 1967-1995
Marriage and Family Review 29,1 (Spring 1999): 77-95.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1300/J002v29n01_06
Cohort(s): Mature Women
Publisher: Haworth Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Age and Ageing; Age at First Birth; Family Characteristics; Family Structure; Grandchildren; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Mothers, Adolescent; Racial Differences; Residence; Women

Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey, Mature Women's Cohort, this study found that not only is a sizable minority of mature women likely to reside with their aging parents and relatives in any given survey year, but that this trend increases over time. Unexpectedly, black women were found to be more likely than white women to reside in age-gapped families, signifying that they were more likely than white women to delay childbirth. Black women also were found to have greater frequencies and prevalence of residing in intergenerational families than white women. This pattern indicated, by extension, that intergenerational responsibilities might be a greater factor contributing to delayed childbirth for black women than was the case for white women. As expected, few aging parents or relatives were found in age-condensed families. The presence of grandchildren, rather than a respondent's own children, apparently accounted for this finding. This pattern suggested that, for maturing women who had been teenage mothers, the flow of intergenerational responsibilities proceeds more extensively in the direction of subsequent generations rather than toward previous generations.
Bibliography Citation
Caputo, Richard K. "Age-Condensed and Age-Gapped Families: Coresidency with Elderly Parents and Relatives in a Mature Women's Cohort, 1967-1995." Marriage and Family Review 29,1 (Spring 1999): 77-95.
4. Caputo, Richard K.
Assets and Economic Mobility in a Youth Cohort, 1985-1997
Families in Society: The Journal of Contemporary Social Services 84,1 (January 2003): 51-62.
Also: http://www.familiesinsociety.org/ShowAbstract.asp?docid=73
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Manticore Publishers
Keyword(s): Assets; Economic Well-Being; Mobility; Mobility, Economic; Retirement; Savings; Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study examined the role of assets in economic mobility within a youth cohort (N = 4,467) between 1985 and 1997. Increasing percentages of poor and affluent youth resided in families with no change in economic status while increasing percentages of middle-class youth resided in families experiences downward economic mobility. The rate of economic stasis of youth living in affluent families was about three times that of those in poor families. Length of time of asset ownership influenced economic mobility beyond that of background, sociodemographic, psychological, and other cumulative correlates. In particular, IRAs and tax-deferred annuities were related to positive economic mobility. Robust indicators of positive economic mobility included being a college graduate, number of siblings in family of origin, number of years of full-time employment, number of years living in household where someone received either AFDC/TANF or SSI, and locus of control. Robust indicators of downward economic mobility included age of respondent, number of years married, and being Catholic. Finally, neither sex nor race/ethnicity increased the explanatory power of positive economic mobility beyond that of other correlates regardless of asset ownership. Discussion also includes public and private initiatives to expand IRAs into individual Development Accounts and to encourage employers to offer (and workers to take advantage of) tax-deferred annuities, particularly for low-income workers.
Bibliography Citation
Caputo, Richard K. "Assets and Economic Mobility in a Youth Cohort, 1985-1997." Families in Society: The Journal of Contemporary Social Services 84,1 (January 2003): 51-62.
5. Caputo, Richard K.
Becoming Poor and Using Public Assistance Programs
Journal of Poverty 3,1 (1999): 1-23.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1300/J134v03n01_01
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Haworth Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Poverty; Welfare

Using logistic regression analysis on data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, this study found that social psychological attributes failed to affect the likelihood of becoming poor and of using public assistance programs beyond that of sociodemographic characteristics. The number of years respondents lived in poverty was the best predictor of moving from above poverty in one year to below poverty the following year, while the number of years respondents lived in families that received public assistance was the best predictor of moving from self-support to entering into a public assistance program from one year to the next. Implications regarding the contemporary shift in the philosophy of social welfare from income maintenance to self-support are discussed. [Article copies available for a fee from The Haworth Document Delivery Service: 1800-342-9678. E-mail address: getinfo@haworthpressinc.com]. Copyright 1999 by The Haworth Press, Inc. All rights reserved.
Bibliography Citation
Caputo, Richard K. "Becoming Poor and Using Public Assistance Programs." Journal of Poverty 3,1 (1999): 1-23.
6. Caputo, Richard K.
Correlates of Mortality in a U.S. Cohort of Youth, 1980-98: Implications for Social Justice
Social Justice Research 15,3 (September 2002): 271-293
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Plenum Publishing Corporation
Keyword(s): Adolescent Behavior; Ethnic Groups/Ethnicity; Family Structure; Gender; Health Factors; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Marital Instability; Mortality; Racial Differences; Socioeconomic Status (SES); Unemployment Rate

This paper reports results of a study based on a nationally representative sample of U.S. youth (N=11,549) that asked two questions: (1) How does family structure affect the likelihood of adolescent death beyond that of race/ethnicity, sex, socioeconomic status, personal behavior, and other structural factors and (2) under what conditions might appeals for social justice be warranted for relative mortality statuses and for absolute gains in mortality? The study found that marital instability increases the likelihood of dying when controlling for a variety of other factors including class, race/ethnicity, sex, and unemployment rate in area of residence. The author argues that this finding lends support to social justice arguments to redistribute resources in such a way as to ensure the likelihood of absolute gains in mortality. The study also found, however, that race/ethnicity/sex also accounted for the likelihood of dying independently of family structure when controlling for socioeconomic and other factors. The author argues that this finding lends support to social justice arguments to redistribute resources on the basis of relative mortality statuses.
Bibliography Citation
Caputo, Richard K. "Correlates of Mortality in a U.S. Cohort of Youth, 1980-98: Implications for Social Justice." Social Justice Research 15,3 (September 2002): 271-293.
7. Caputo, Richard K.
Credit Card and Mortgage Debt: A Panel Study, 2004 and 2008
Families in Society: The Journal of Contemporary Social Services 93,1 (2012): 11-21.
Also: http://alliance1.metapress.com/content/u53274563v305337/
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Alliance for Children and Families
Keyword(s): Attitudes; Credit/Credit Constraint; Debt/Borrowing; Educational Attainment; Marital Status; Socioeconomic Status (SES)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Relying on data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1979 cohort, this article examines the pervasiveness and depth of credit card and mortgage debt in 2004 and 2008 (N = 3,966). Findings indicate that (a) significant majorities experienced either credit card debt, mortgage debt, or both; (b) debtors increased as a proportion of the population between 2004 and 2008; (c) mortgage-related debt, but not credit card debt, was disproportionately distributed along sociodemographic characteristics (married, more affluent, and more educated) and by attitudinal dispositions (locus of control and self-esteem); and (d) separated/widowed/divorced persons and never married persons were more economically vulnerable, having higher mortgage debt-to-income ratios of more than 1.5 to 2 times their income.
Bibliography Citation
Caputo, Richard K. "Credit Card and Mortgage Debt: A Panel Study, 2004 and 2008." Families in Society: The Journal of Contemporary Social Services 93,1 (2012): 11-21.
8. Caputo, Richard K.
Depression and Health among Grandmothers Co-Residing with Grandchildren in Two Cohorts of Women
Families in Society: The Journal of Contemporary Human Services 82,5 (September-October 2001): 473-483.
Also: http://www.familiesinsociety.org/ShowAbstract.asp?docid=166
Cohort(s): Mature Women, Young Women
Publisher: Manticore Publishers
Keyword(s): Coresidence; Depression (see also CESD); Grandchildren; Grandmothers; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper examined depression and health of grandmothers who co-resided with grandchildren in 1997 in two cohorts of women, one aged 30-44 in 1967 (N= 2,080), and the other aged 14-24 in 1968 (N= 1,708). Co-resident grandmothers in both cohorts were more likely than other mothers to have higher levels of depression and about one-fifth were likely to exhibit levels high enough to place them "at risk" for clinical depression. Co-residency, however, was not found to be a good predictor of either level of depression or changes in the level of depression, but prior levels of depression were positively related to changes in the level of depression among mothers in general when controlling for current or previous co-residency. Health status was found to be a good predictor of depression when accounting for co-residency and work effort among other factors.
Bibliography Citation
Caputo, Richard K. "Depression and Health among Grandmothers Co-Residing with Grandchildren in Two Cohorts of Women." Families in Society: The Journal of Contemporary Human Services 82,5 (September-October 2001): 473-483.
9. Caputo, Richard K.
Discrimination and Human Capital: A Challenge to Economic Theory & Social Justice
Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare 29,2 (June 2002): 105-124.
Also: http://www.wmich.edu/hhs/newsletters_journals/jssw/29-2.htm
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Western Michigan University School of Social Work
Keyword(s): Affirmative Action; Discrimination; Discrimination, Age; Discrimination, Employer; Discrimination, Job; Discrimination, Racial/Ethnic; Discrimination, Sex; Gender Differences; Human Capital; Racial Differences; Schooling; Training

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This article reports findings of a study using the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY79) to test the rational choice theory that discrimination discourages investments in human capital. Nearly 60% of the study sample (N=5585) reported job-hiring discrimination (race, nationality, sex, or age) between 1979 and 1982 and they were found to invest more in job training programs and additional schooling between 1983 and 1998 than those reporting no such discrimination. White males were found to have the greatest advantage over black males and females in regard to job training and over black females in regard to additional schooling. Findings suggest that appeals to affirmative action policies and programs based on race and sex remain warranted.
Bibliography Citation
Caputo, Richard K. "Discrimination and Human Capital: A Challenge to Economic Theory & Social Justice." Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare 29,2 (June 2002): 105-124.
10. Caputo, Richard K.
Discrimination and Pension Income Among Aging Women
Journal of Aging and Social Policy 10,2 (1998): 67-83.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1300/J031v09n02_05
Cohort(s): Mature Women
Publisher: Haworth Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Demography; Discrimination, Age; Discrimination, Sex; Human Capital; Pensions; Wage Levels

Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Labor Market Experience, Mature Women's Cohort, this study examined the extent to which discrimination influenced pension receipt and levels of pension income among women aged 55-69 in 1992. It found that discrimination affected the level of pension income beyond that of demographic and human capital variables, when controlling for wage-related income, only among moderate-to-affluent near-elderly women. No relation was found between discrimination and receipt of pension income.
Bibliography Citation
Caputo, Richard K. "Discrimination and Pension Income Among Aging Women." Journal of Aging and Social Policy 10,2 (1998): 67-83.
11. Caputo, Richard K.
Early Education Experiences and School-to-Work Program Participation
Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare 30,4 (December 2003): 144-156. also: http://www.wmich.edu/hhs/newsletters_journals/jssw/30-4.htm
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Western Michigan University School of Social Work
Keyword(s): Ethnic Differences; Head Start; Heterogeneity; Program Participation/Evaluation; Racial Differences; Transition, School to Work; Youth Problems

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study assesses the effects of Head Start participation and demonstrated academic ability during elementary school on School-to-Work (STW) program participation. The study sample comes from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1997 Cohort and comprises 4,370 adolescents who reported grades they received while in the 8th grade and whether or not they ever repeated a grade in grammar school. Findings indicate the STW programs attract disproportionate numbers of students with histories of marginal demonstrated academic ability. This is so because STW programs are also more likely to attract Head Starters. Demonstrated academic ability varies by race/ethnicity and sex, with lower participation rates by white males. The author suggests that efforts to achieve a more heterogeneous racial/ethnic mix of students to take advantage of school-to-work based initiatives would strengthen such programs. In doing so, such efforts would increase the prospects of Head Start participants entering the mainstream of socieoeconomic life in the US more easily than would be the case otherwise. In addition, such efforts would make the US workforce more competitive in an increasingly global economy.
Bibliography Citation
Caputo, Richard K. "Early Education Experiences and School-to-Work Program Participation." Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare 30,4 (December 2003): 144-156.
12. Caputo, Richard K.
Economic Mobility in a Youth Cohort, 1979-1993
Presented: San Francisco, CA, American Sociological Association Annual Meetings, August 1998
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Marital Status; Mobility, Economic; Mobility, Social; Social Environment; Socioeconomic Factors; Socioeconomic Status (SES)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Draws on National Longitudinal Survey of Youth data to examine correlates of economic mobility among a youth cohort (N = 2,745) stratified by ethnicity/race & sex, 1979-1993. Findings show that (1) 14.2% of the families of youth reported no change in economic level; (2) low-income white males & females had greater upward mobility than other sex & ethnicity/race groups; (3) black females had the least upward mobility & the most downward mobility relative to other groups; (4) only highest grade completed accounted for variance in lifetime economic mobility across all sex & ethnicity/race groups; & (5) other correlates of economic mobility - eg, marital status, years of full-time work, & use of public assistance programs - varied by sex & ethnicity/race groups. Implications for poverty-related policy are discussed.
Bibliography Citation
Caputo, Richard K. "Economic Mobility in a Youth Cohort, 1979-1993." Presented: San Francisco, CA, American Sociological Association Annual Meetings, August 1998.
13. Caputo, Richard K.
Economic Mobility in a Youth Cohort, 1979-1997
Journal of Poverty 5,3 (2001): 39-63.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1300/J134v05n03_03
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Haworth Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Aid for Families with Dependent Children (AFDC); Economic Changes/Recession; Education; Ethnic Groups/Ethnicity; Family Income; Gender Differences; Income; Income Level; Mobility; Mobility, Economic; Poverty; Racial Differences; Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF)

Economic mobility in a youth cohort (n = 1956) was examined between 1979 and 1997. Increasing percentages of youth were found to reside in families with no change in economic status stratified by class. The rate of economic stasis of youth living in affluent families was more than twice that of those in middle-income families and more than four times that of those in poor families. Little variation in economic mobility was found among affluent families stratified by sex and ethnicity/race, although white males had less downward mobility than black females. Greater variation in economic mobility was found among poor families, with white males having greater upward mobility than other males and white females having greater upward mobility than black females and males. Finally, education was positively related to economic mobility for most sub-groups, as was receipt of SSI, while receipt of AFDC/TANF decreased economic mobility only among white males.
Bibliography Citation
Caputo, Richard K. "Economic Mobility in a Youth Cohort, 1979-1997." Journal of Poverty 5,3 (2001): 39-63.
14. Caputo, Richard K.
Economic Well-Being in a Youth Cohort
Families in Society: The Journal of Contemporary Human Services 79,1 (January 1998): 83-92.
Also: http://www.familiesinsociety.org/ShowAbstract.asp?docid=1802
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Manticore Publishers
Keyword(s): Economic Well-Being; Education; Ethnic Differences; Gender Differences; Hispanics; Marital Status; Racial Differences; Self-Esteem

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

COPYRIGHT 1998 Families International Inc. Using multiple regression analysis on data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, the author found that the level of economic well-being varied by sex and race or ethnicity. Education, hours worked, and marital status were the most consistent predictors of economic well-being, depending on the sex and race or ethnicity of respondents in 1992 and 1985, and self-esteem was also a consistent predictor among Hispanic men and White women in 1992. Nonetheless, the influence of education on economic well-being declined between 1985 and 1992 for all groups except White women, while the influence of hours worked declined for all groups except Hispanic women and Black men. The findings provided empirical evidence for the reported generalized anxiety in regard to people's ability to influence their economic well-being.
Bibliography Citation
Caputo, Richard K. "Economic Well-Being in a Youth Cohort." Families in Society: The Journal of Contemporary Human Services 79,1 (January 1998): 83-92.
15. Caputo, Richard K.
EITC & TANF Participation among Young Adult Low-income Families
Northwestern Journal of Law and Social Policy 4,1 (Winter 2009): 136-149.
Also: http://www.law.northwestern.edu/journals/njlsp/v4/n1/8/index.htm
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Northwestern Journal of Law and Social Policy
Keyword(s): Aid for Families with Dependent Children (AFDC); Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC); Family Income; Income-to-Povery Ratio (IPR); Program Participation/Evaluation; Socioeconomic Status (SES); Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF); Welfare

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This article examines participation in the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) and Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) programs among young adult (nineteen to twenty-five years of age), low-income families in 2004. Section II provides a brief overview of both programs and reviews related literature about program use. Section III poses the main study questions, describes the study methods, presents findings, and discusses the implications for social welfare policies. The study finds that program use varies by age, number of children in the household, ethnicity/race, work effort, marital status, prior program participation, and sex of participants. Those with two or more children, the least education, ethnic/racial minorities, women, and married persons are more likely than their respective counterparts to take advantage of either or both vis-à-vis neither program. Findings suggest that EITC and TANF are well-targeted, but underutilized programs.
Bibliography Citation
Caputo, Richard K. "EITC & TANF Participation among Young Adult Low-income Families." Northwestern Journal of Law and Social Policy 4,1 (Winter 2009): 136-149.
16. Caputo, Richard K.
Escaping Poverty and Becoming Self-Sufficient
Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare 24,3 (September 1997): 5-23
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Western Michigan University School of Social Work
Keyword(s): Marital Status; Poverty; Welfare; Work Hours

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using logistic regression analysis on data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth this study found that sociodemographic factors were far more influential in determining escape from poverty and becoming self-sufficient than social psychological factors. The number of years respondents lived in poverty was the best predictor of escaping poverty while the number of years respondents made use of public assistance programs was the best predictor of becoming self-sufficient. Marital status and change in the number of hours worked influenced the prospect for escaping poverty though not becoming self-sufficient. Implications regarding the changing philosophy of social welfare from income maintenance to self-sufficiency are discussed.
Bibliography Citation
Caputo, Richard K. "Escaping Poverty and Becoming Self-Sufficient." Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare 24,3 (September 1997): 5-23.
17. Caputo, Richard K.
Family Characteristics, Public Program Participation, and Civic Engagement
Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare 37,2 (June 2010): 35-61.
Also: http://www.wmich.edu/hhs/newsletters_journals/jssw/37-2.htm
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Western Michigan University School of Social Work
Keyword(s): Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC); Family Characteristics; Food Stamps (see Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program); Medicaid/Medicare; Social Roles; Volunteer Work

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study tested for differences on the type and extent of civic engagement between use of visible programs such as Food Stamps and Medicaid and less visible programs such as the Earned Income Tax Credit while accounting for family and sociodemographic characteristics. Policy feedback theory guided the study which used data from the 1979 cohort of the National Longitudinal Surveys. Challenging prior research, means-tested Food Stamps, Medicaid, or EITC program participants were as likely as non-participants to devote time to activities aimed at changing social conditions. What social service agencies can do to enhance civic engagement is discussed.
Bibliography Citation
Caputo, Richard K. "Family Characteristics, Public Program Participation, and Civic Engagement." Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare 37,2 (June 2010): 35-61.
18. Caputo, Richard K.
Family Poverty and Public Dependency
Presented: New York, NY, Society for the Study of Social Problems Annual Meetings, August 1996
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Society for the Study of Social Problems
Keyword(s): Age at First Intercourse; Aid for Families with Dependent Children (AFDC); Education; Family Characteristics; Food Stamps (see Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program); Gender Differences; Marital Status; Poverty; Self-Esteem; Unemployment Compensation; Welfare

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (1993) were used to identify determinants of public benefits among families above & below the official poverty line in 1992. The relative effects of sociodemographic and attitudinal/cultural characteristics were assessed to determine the likelihood of male and female respondents receiving AFDC (Aid to Families with Dependent Children), food stamps, and/or unemployment compensation (UC) benefits. The hypothesis that sociodemographic factors would have far greater explanatory power than attitudinal/cultural characteristics in determining use of public assistance, regardless of sex and poverty status, was tested with a sample of nearly 1,300, 22.3% of whom received either AFDC, UC, food stamps, or some combination. Logistic regression analysis revealed that many of the same sociodemographic characteristics exerted similar influence among men & women on the likelihood of using public assistance, regardless of poverty status. Marital status & education were notable exceptions. Female recipients of public assistance were less likely to be married, while male recipients were more likely to be married only if they were poor. Education affected only the nonpoor. Regarding attitudinal/cultural characteristics, age of first sexual intercourse influenced use of public assistance only for nonpoor women, while self-esteem did so only for poor women. Findings suggest that men and women used public assistance as a buffer against economic vulnerability, and that increased education might be a less effective means to self-sufficiency than commonly thought. Antipoverty policy implications are discussed. (Copyright 1996, Sociological Abstracts, Inc., all rights reserved.)
Bibliography Citation
Caputo, Richard K. "Family Poverty and Public Dependency." Presented: New York, NY, Society for the Study of Social Problems Annual Meetings, August 1996.
19. Caputo, Richard K.
Family Poverty and Public Dependency
Families in Society: The Journal of Contemporary Human Services 78,1 (January-February 1997): 13-25.
Also: http://www.familiesinsociety.org/ShowAbstract.asp?docid=733
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Manticore Publishers
Keyword(s): Age at First Intercourse; Aid for Families with Dependent Children (AFDC); Education; Family Characteristics; Food Stamps (see Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program); Gender Differences; Marital Status; Poverty; Self-Esteem; Unemployment Compensation; Welfare

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The author used data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, survey year 1993, to identify determinants of public benefits among families above and below the official poverty line in 1992. The relative effects of sociodemographic and attitudinal/cultural characteristics were assessed to determine the likelihood of male and female respondents receiving Aid to Families with Depend dent Children, food stamps, and/or unemployment-compensation benefits. Results indicated that many sociodemographic characteristics exerted similar influence on men and women regarding the likelihood of using public assistance regardless of poverty status. Marital status and education were notable exceptions. Findings suggested that men and women used public assistance as a buffer against economic vulnerability and that increased education might be a less effective means to self-suffciency than commonly thought. Antipoverty policy implications are discussed.
Bibliography Citation
Caputo, Richard K. "Family Poverty and Public Dependency." Families in Society: The Journal of Contemporary Human Services 78,1 (January-February 1997): 13-25.
20. Caputo, Richard K.
Grandmothers and Coresident Grandchildren
Families in Society: The Journal of Contemporary Human Services 80,2 (March-April 1999): 120-126.
Also: http://www.familiesinsociety.org/ShowAbstract.asp?docid=654
Cohort(s): Mature Women
Publisher: Manticore Publishers
Keyword(s): Coresidence; Grandchildren; Grandmothers; Income; Life Course; Marital Status

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This article reports findings of a national study examining characteristics of coresident grandmothers and their grandchildren between 1967 and 1992 (n = 1099). Findings suggested that coresident grandmotherhood may be more prevalent than previously Indicated, and of longer duration, over the life course. Among the study sample of ever coresident grandmothers (n = 753), age, income status (having an income less than 50% of the median family income), and race were found to be negatively correlated with coresidency in 1992, while number of children and years of coresident grandparenthood were found to be positively related to coresidency. Among the study sample of coresident families in 1992 (n = 285), age and income status were found to be negatively correlated with the likelihood of living in a three-generation household while number of coresident grandchildren and marital status (being single) were found to be positively correlated with three-generation households. In addition, sizable minorities of both three- and skipped-generation households had tow income. Policy and program implications are discussed.
Bibliography Citation
Caputo, Richard K. "Grandmothers and Coresident Grandchildren." Families in Society: The Journal of Contemporary Human Services 80,2 (March-April 1999): 120-126.
21. Caputo, Richard K.
Grandparents and Coresident Grandchildren in a Youth Cohort
Journal of Family Issues 22,5 (July 2001): 541-556.
Also: http://jfi.sagepub.com/content/22/5/541.abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Coresidence; Grandchildren; Grandparents

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This article examined correlates of grandparent-grandchild coresidency in 1998, using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. Among parents 40 years of age or younger in 1998 (N = 5,019), 107 reported grandchildren in the same households. Compared with other parents, coresident grandparents were older, less educated, much younger at the time of the birth of their first child, and 2 to 4 times as likely to be female, single, Black, poor, and unemployed. The majority (81.3%) of coresident grandparents had one grandchild living with them. Only 5.5% lived in skipped-generation households.
Bibliography Citation
Caputo, Richard K. "Grandparents and Coresident Grandchildren in a Youth Cohort." Journal of Family Issues 22,5 (July 2001): 541-556.
22. Caputo, Richard K.
Head Start and School-to-Work Program Participation
Journal of Poverty 8,2 (2004): 25-42.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1300/J134v08n02_02
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Haworth Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Head Start; High School Curriculum; Program Participation/Evaluation; Transition, School to Work

Using logistic regression analysis, this study of 4,540 high school students in the U. S. shows that Head Starters have a greater likelihood of participating in School-to-Work programs when controlling for curriculum type, school auspices, sex, race/ethnicity, and academic class level. Head Start participation makes no difference in regard to type of training among STW program participants. Evidence is mixed in regard to whether or not STW programs might constitute a de facto tracking system for Head Start graduates. Tracking appears to occur, but with positive and negative consequences. On one hand, findings suggest that Head Starters who participate in STW programs are more likely to remain in high school longer than non-STW participants. On the other hand, due to lower participation rates by white males, STW fails to achieve the sexual and racial/ethnic diversity requisite to ensure greater levels of academic rigor than might be the case otherwise. The author concludes that government educational programs designed for all socioeconomic groups can benefit those from economically disadvantaged families.
Bibliography Citation
Caputo, Richard K. "Head Start and School-to-Work Program Participation." Journal of Poverty 8,2 (2004): 25-42.
23. Caputo, Richard K.
Head Start, Other Preschool Programs, and Life Success in a Youth Cohort
Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare 30,2 (June 2003): 105-126.
Also: http://www.wmich.edu/hhs/newsletters_journals/jssw/30-2.htm
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Western Michigan University School of Social Work
Keyword(s): Aid for Families with Dependent Children (AFDC); Economic Well-Being; Head Start; Mobility, Economic; Pearlin Mastery Scale; Preschool Children; Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES) (see Self-Esteem); Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study assesses the effects of Head Start and other preschool programs on five life success measures in a U.S. cohort of youth (N= 5,621). The life successes indices are average annual income-to-poverty ratios, economic mobility, and number of years the youth lived in families whose incomes fell below official poverty thresholds, received Food Stamps, and received TANF/AFDC. Controlling for a variety of background and other factors in separate regression models for each life success measure, results show that youth who participated in preschool programs other than Head Start had higher average annual income-to-poverty ratios than non-preschoolers. Bivariate findings corroborate previous research indicating that Head Starters are economically and behaviorally disadvantaged compared to other preschool and non-preschool children. Multivariate findings of this study also show that Head Starters do as well as non-preschoolers in regard to the four other life success measures. In essence, on these measures Head Starters become mainstreamed by the time they enter the labor force, start their own families, and form their own households, such that they fare no better or worse than other preschoolers and non-preschoolers in regard to economic mobility, years lived in poor families, and receipt of Food Stamps and TANF/AFDC. Findings support continued funding of Head Start but also suggest that higher levels of funding may be necessary to raise family incomes above poverty comparable to other preschool programs.
Bibliography Citation
Caputo, Richard K. "Head Start, Other Preschool Programs, and Life Success in a Youth Cohort." Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare 30,2 (June 2003): 105-126.
24. Caputo, Richard K.
Head Start, Poor Children, and Their Families
Journal of Poverty 2,2 (1998): 1-22.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1300/J134v02n02_01
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Haworth Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Age at First Birth; Aid for Families with Dependent Children (AFDC); Family Studies; Head Start; Home Environment; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Marital Status; Mothers; Mothers, Education; Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT); Poverty; Racial Differences; Racial Studies; Residence; Welfare

This study used data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth and the NLS's Child-Mother file to identify characteristics associated with the likelihood of poor children ever having participated in a Head Start program, and, among those who did, of their having lived in persistently poor families. Using logistic regression analysis on all children of survey year 1992 female respondents who had lived at least one year in poverty, the study found that number of years in poverty, race, and mother's marital status in 1992 were associated with the likelihood of a child's participating in Head Start. Among Head Start participants, mother's education level, mother's age at time of first birth, residency, the emotional dimension of the child's home environment, and mother's marital status were associated with persistent poverty. When number of years Head Start families received AFDC and/or Food Stamps was accounted for, only mother's marital status, residency, and number of years on public assistance were associated with persistent poverty. Policy implications were discussed.
Bibliography Citation
Caputo, Richard K. "Head Start, Poor Children, and Their Families." Journal of Poverty 2,2 (1998): 1-22.
25. Caputo, Richard K.
Inheritance and Intergenerational Transmission of Parental Care
Marriage and Family Review 37,1-2 (2005): 107-127.
Also: In: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1300/J002v37n01_08
Cohort(s): Young Women
Publisher: Haworth Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Caregivers, Adult Children; Gender Differences; Inheritance; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission

SUMMARY. This paper examines the relative influence of inheritance-related and intergenerational factors on the likelihood of adult daughters providing personal care, doing household chores, or providing income to their aging parents. The study sample (n = 399) comprises a sub-sample of the National Longitudinal Surveys, Young Women's Cohort. Findings challenge the primacy of an "ethic of care" attributed to adult children in general and adult daughters in particular in regard to filial obligation to parents when it comes to providing personal care. They also in part support "ethic of care" theories when it comes to providing financial assistance. Findings suggest that targeted legislation with specific incentives may be more effective than bully pulpit or moral exhortations to ensure sufficient care by adult children for aging baby boomers in non-institutionalized settings for as long as possible to offset the costs of more formal care in years to come. [Article copies available for a fee from The Haworth Document Delivery Service: 1-800-HAWORTH. E-mail address: Website: © 2005 by The Haworth Press, Inc. All rights reserved.]

Published simultaneously In: Challenges of Aging on U.S. Families: Policy and Practice Implications, R.K. Caputo. The Haworth Press, Inc., 2005

Bibliography Citation
Caputo, Richard K. "Inheritance and Intergenerational Transmission of Parental Care." Marriage and Family Review 37,1-2 (2005): 107-127.
26. Caputo, Richard K.
Marital Status and Other Correlates of Personal Bankruptcy, 1986–2004
Marriage and Family Review 44,1 (Fall 2008): 5-32.
Also: http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/title~db=all~content=g903677742
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Haworth Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Bankruptcy; Economic Well-Being; Marital Status

Relying on National Longitudinal Survey (NLS) data, this retrospective cohort study found that 11.6% (n¼882) of the eligible study sample (N¼7,609) declared personal or nonbusiness, nonentrepreneurial between 1986 and 2004. These debtors had average annual incomes that were about 2.5 times official poverty thresholds. Those who were divorced in 2004 were most likely to have declared bankruptcy (16.4%), followed by separated (13.9%), married with spouses present (11.2%), and never–married (7.0%) persons. Specific correlates of bankruptcy varied by year. Marital status was associated with likelihood of declaring bankruptcy in only 6 of 14 survey years: Never-married persons at the time of declared bankruptcy were less likely than married persons to declare, whereas formerly married persons, whether divorced or separated, were more likely than married persons to do so. Formerly married persons who declared bankruptcy bounced back economically to a lesser degree than did married persons, even though their predeclared bankruptcy levels of economic well-being were roughly equivalent. Interaction effects showed that formerly married women were more likely to declare bankruptcy than their male counterparts.
Bibliography Citation
Caputo, Richard K. "Marital Status and Other Correlates of Personal Bankruptcy, 1986–2004." Marriage and Family Review 44,1 (Fall 2008): 5-32.
27. Caputo, Richard K.
Parent Religiosity, Family Processes, and Adolescent Outcomes
Families in Society: The Journal of Contemporary Social Services 85, 4 (October/December 2004): 495-510.
Also: http://www.familiesinsociety.org/ShowAbstract.asp?docid=1837
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Manticore Publishers
Keyword(s): Adolescent Behavior; Delinquency/Gang Activity; Health, Mental; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Parental Influences; Peers/Peer influence/Peer relations; Religious Influences; Social Influences; Substance Use

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study examined the effects of parent religiosity, family processes, and peer influences on adolescent behavior in light of social control and social learning theories. Data were obtained from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1997. Findings of the study sample of 1,911 adolescents indicated that parent religiosity was positively associated with good health and higher levels of education, while inversely related to substance abuse. Adolescents with authoritarian parents had higher levels of delinquency, worse health, and worse mental health than those with permissive parents. Adolescents with uninvolved parents completed fewer years of schooling. Compared with parental religiosity and family processes, peer influences had the most influential effects on delinquency, substance abuse, and, to a lesser extent, mental health.
Bibliography Citation
Caputo, Richard K. "Parent Religiosity, Family Processes, and Adolescent Outcomes." Families in Society: The Journal of Contemporary Social Services 85, 4 (October/December 2004): 495-510.
28. Caputo, Richard K.
Patterns and Predictors of Debt: A Panel Study, 1985-2008
Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare 39,2 (June 2012): 7-29.
Also: http://www.wmich.edu/hhs/newsletters_journals/jssw/39-2.html
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Western Michigan University School of Social Work
Keyword(s): Debt/Borrowing; Gender Differences; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Income Level; Locus of Control (see Rotter Scale); Marital Status; Racial Differences; Self-Esteem; Socioeconomic Status (SES)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Relying on panel data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY79), this study finds that about half the study sample (N = 5,304) never experienced annual debt between 1985 and 2008, that the vast majority of those who incurred annual debt were short-term (1 year) or intermittent debtors (2-4 years), that the proportion of the study sample in debt for the most part declined over time, but also that the level of debt increased. Multinomial regression results indicated that health status and level of changes in income are robust predictors of debt in general, that age and race/ethnicity are robust predictors of short-term and intermittent debt, that locus of control, family structure during adolescence, SES, work effort, and marital status are robust predictors of intermittent and chronic debt, and that self-esteem, gender, SES, and work effort are robust predictors of chronic debt. Findings challenge blanket contentions that a culture of debt characterizes individuals and families in the U.S and they present a more nuanced portrait of debtors than the stereotype as young and single.
Bibliography Citation
Caputo, Richard K. "Patterns and Predictors of Debt: A Panel Study, 1985-2008." Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare 39,2 (June 2012): 7-29.
29. Caputo, Richard K.
Perceived Work-Related Discrimination by Women: Implications for Social Justice and Affirmative Action
Journal of Policy Practice 6,2 (Summer 2007): 5-22
Cohort(s): Young Women
Publisher: Haworth Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Affirmative Action; Human Capital; Schooling; Training, On-the-Job

This study used data from the National Longitudinal Survey, Young Women's cohort, to assess the relationship between perceived discrimination and investments in human capital. Nearly 45% of the study sample (N = 654) reported job-related discrimination between 1972 and 2003. Women who perceived work-related discrimination were 1.6 times as likely to complete additional schooling, 2.4 times as likely to participate in occupational training, and nearly twice as likely to participate in on-the-job training (OJT) than those perceiving no such discrimination when controlling for a variety of measures. They also had higher average annual earnings. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

Copyright of Journal of Policy Practice is the property of Haworth and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts)

Bibliography Citation
Caputo, Richard K. "Perceived Work-Related Discrimination by Women: Implications for Social Justice and Affirmative Action." Journal of Policy Practice 6,2 (Summer 2007): 5-22.
30. Caputo, Richard K.
Personal Retirement Accounts and the American Welfare State: A Study of Income Volatility and Socioeconomic Status as Correlates of PRA Support
Journal of Poverty 12,2 (June 2008): 229-250.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/10875540801973625
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Haworth Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Retirement; Social Security; Socioeconomic Status (SES); Welfare

Based on a sample (n = 6,407) from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1979 cohort, this study found a sizable majority (69.1%) of support to replace a portion of Social Security with Private Retirement Accounts. Logistic regression analysis showed that SES was a robust predictor of PRA support, particularly for upper class vs. lower class respondents. Findings suggested that there may be less support for a major pillar of welfare state social provisioning, despite successful Congressional attempts to block related legislation to date, especially since the opinions of more affluent persons tend to have greater resonance with policymakers than those of lower income individuals. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Bibliography Citation
Caputo, Richard K. "Personal Retirement Accounts and the American Welfare State: A Study of Income Volatility and Socioeconomic Status as Correlates of PRA Support." Journal of Poverty 12,2 (June 2008): 229-250.
31. Caputo, Richard K.
Prevalence and Patterns of Earned Income Tax Credit Use Among Eligible Tax-Filing Families: A Panel Study, 1999-2005
Families in Society: The Journal of Contemporary Social Services 91,1 (January 2010): 8-15.
Also: http://www.familiesinsociety.org/ShowAbstract.asp?docid=3950
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Manticore Publishers
Keyword(s): Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC); Family Income; Food Stamps (see Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program); Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP, formerly Food Stamps); Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Use of the EITC is increasingly important for eligible individuals and families in light of changes to public policies and welfare programs, such as with PRWORA and TANF. Relying on National Longitudinal Survey data over a 7-year study period, this study shows that about one third of those in their prime working years are likely to be classified as working poor. Despite that striking percentage, low-income, prime-age working adults have low EITC take-up rates (less than 20% of EITC-eligible families filed for the credit) despite federal, state, and private outreach efforts. This was found to be the case even for groups considered less economically vulnerable or in need of social protections, such as men in general and married persons. Additional direct practice, advocacy, and policy goals aimed at increasing the take-up rate for the EITC are identified. Social workers and other helping professionals would do well by their working-poor clientele to be knowledgeable about the EITC program, inquire about tax-filing status as part of routine data collection, and encourage those EITC-eligible nonfilers to file. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Bibliography Citation
Caputo, Richard K. "Prevalence and Patterns of Earned Income Tax Credit Use Among Eligible Tax-Filing Families: A Panel Study, 1999-2005." Families in Society: The Journal of Contemporary Social Services 91,1 (January 2010): 8-15.
32. Caputo, Richard K.
Psychological, Attitudinal, and Socio-Demographic Correlates of Economic Well-Being of Mature Women
Journal of Women and Aging 9,4 (1997): 37-54
Cohort(s): Mature Women
Publisher: Haworth Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Age and Ageing; Attitudes; Disadvantaged, Economically; Economic Well-Being; Economics of Gender; Locus of Control (see Rotter Scale); Marital Status; Psychological Effects; Retirement; Social Security; Unemployment; Women's Studies

The purpose of this study was to determine attitudinal, psychological, and socio-demographic correlates of economic wellbeing of mature women. Using multiple regression analysis on a sample (N = 1,506) of mature women from the National Longitudinal Survey of Labor Market Experience, this study found that education, race, marital history, attitude toward retirement, and unemployment were predictors of economic well-being for women aged 55-64, while education, Traditionally, and work effort were predictors for women aged 65-69. Neither home ownership residence, receipt of Social Security/other retirement pension benefits, internal-external locus of control, nor health limitations were associated with economic well-being. Bivariate findings indicated that older women were more likely than younger women to be economically disadvantaged and that compared to younger economically disadvantaged women, similarly situated older women were less economically disadvantaged Overall resultssuggested that older women rely on work to maintain and/or better their standard of living. Implications regarding the limited impact of Social Security and pensions on the economic well-being of women aged 55-69 are discussed. (Article copies available for a fee from The Haworth Document Delivery Service).
Bibliography Citation
Caputo, Richard K. "Psychological, Attitudinal, and Socio-Demographic Correlates of Economic Well-Being of Mature Women." Journal of Women and Aging 9,4 (1997): 37-54.
33. Caputo, Richard K.
Race and Marital History as Correlates of Women's Access to Family-Friendly Employee Benefits
Journal of Family and Economic Issues 21,4 (December 2000): 365-385.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/k2658j7658503693/
Cohort(s): Young Women
Publisher: Plenum Publishing Corporation
Keyword(s): Benefits; Children; Education; Employment; Marriage; Racial Differences; Wages; Women; Work History

Using a nationally representative sample of young women surveyed intermittently since 1968 (N=2030), this study assessed the effects of race and marital history on access to family-friendly employee benefits between 1978 and 1995. Accounting for such factors as work history, total number of employers for whom the respondent has worked, education level, and number of children, race was found to act as a suppressor variable. White women were found to work for more years for employers providing family-friendly benefits even though Black women worked for more years in full-time jobs. Results suggested that systematic biases relegated Black women to lower-paying full-time jobs without family-friendly benefits more so than was the case for White women. Policy implications regarding affirmative action are discussed. No relationship was found between marital history and access to jobs with family-friendly benefits when taking into account other sociodemographic and employment-related characteristics.
Bibliography Citation
Caputo, Richard K. "Race and Marital History as Correlates of Women's Access to Family-Friendly Employee Benefits." Journal of Family and Economic Issues 21,4 (December 2000): 365-385.
34. Caputo, Richard K.
Race, Region, and the Intergenerational Transmission of Grandmother-Grandchild Co-Residency
Race, Gender and Class 9,3 ( 2002): 61-75.
Also: http://rgc.uno.edu/journal/journal01-09.cfm#Vol%209%20#%203
Cohort(s): Mature Women, Young Women
Publisher: Southern University at New Orleans Race, Gender and Class Project (SUNO-RGC Project)
Keyword(s): Coresidence; Depression (see also CESD); Family Structure; Family Studies; Grandchildren; Grandmothers; Grandparents; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Mothers and Daughters; Pairs (also see Siblings); Racial Differences; Regions

This study extends recent research in the area of grandparent-grandchildren reltions. It uses National Longitudinal Survey data and logistic regression analysis to determine the likelihood that grandmothers who resided with grandchildren were also likely to have daughters who resided with grandchildren. Of 1098 co-resident grandmothers in the present study, 105 (9%) comprised the sub-sample of grandmother-grandchild mother-daughter pairs. Intergenerational transmission of grandmother-grandchild co-residency was four times more common among Blacks than among Whites, and twice as likely to occur in the South. Age at the time of the birth of one's first child was inversely related to intergenerational transmission of co-residency, while socioeconomic status was positively related to it. No statistically significant differences were found by grandmother-grandchild mother-daughter pair status in regard to physical or mental health among co-resident grandmothers. Nonetheless, about 60% of older co-resident grandmothers reported health limitations in 1997, while 11-18% depending on grandmother-grandchild mother-daughter pair status reported levels of depressive symptomatology that placed them at risk. Copyright 2002 by Race, Gender & Class.
Bibliography Citation
Caputo, Richard K. "Race, Region, and the Intergenerational Transmission of Grandmother-Grandchild Co-Residency." Race, Gender and Class 9,3 ( 2002): 61-75.
35. Caputo, Richard K.
Receipt of Child Support by Working Single Women
Families in Society: The Journal of Contemporary Human Services 77,10 (December 1996): 615-625.
Also: http://www.familiesinsociety.org/ShowAbstract.asp?docid=982
Cohort(s): Young Women
Publisher: Manticore Publishers
Keyword(s): Child Support; Divorce; Education; Marital Status; Maternal Employment; Women

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using logistic regression, the author found that sociodemographic factors, particularly race, education, and number of children/young adults, more than attitudinal factors, distinguished recipients of child support from nonrecipient among formerly married working mothers m 1988 and 1991. In 199l, for formerly married mothers, child-care affinity was the only attitudinal characteristics associated with the likelihood of receiving child support. Because of the small sample sizes, fir clings about never married working mothers were more ambiguous. Policy and practice implications are discussed.
Bibliography Citation
Caputo, Richard K. "Receipt of Child Support by Working Single Women." Families in Society: The Journal of Contemporary Human Services 77,10 (December 1996): 615-625.
36. Caputo, Richard K.
Religious Capital and Intergenerational Transmission of Volunteering as Correlates of Civic Engagement
Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly 38,6 (December 2009): 983-1002.
Also: http://nvs.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/38/6/983
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Religious Influences; Sociability/Socialization/Social Interaction; Social Capital; Volunteer Work

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using a subsample of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY97), this study (N = 2,471) provides evidence in support of social capital and socialization theories. Intergenerational transmission of civic engagement activities was found to occur through mechanisms such as parental religiosity and voluntarism. Using multinomial logistic regression analysis, correlates of four types of civic engagement were examined: mixed motivation voluntarism (voluntary participation in activist and nonactivist activities, n = 401), exclusively activist (n = 109), exclusive voluntarism (n = 652), and as the referent non–civic minded (no voluntary participation in either activist or nonactivist activities, n = 1,309). Parental voluntarism, socialization, religious participation, education, and presence of children were found to be robust predictors of mixed motivation voluntarism; parental devotion, presence of children, and race/ethnicity, of exclusive activism; and parental religious affiliation and fundamentalism, socialization, and religious participation, self-perceived sense of trustfulness, presence of children, and race/ethnicity of exclusive voluntarism.
Bibliography Citation
Caputo, Richard K. "Religious Capital and Intergenerational Transmission of Volunteering as Correlates of Civic Engagement." Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly 38,6 (December 2009): 983-1002.
37. Caputo, Richard K.
Religiousness and Adolescent Behaviors: A Comparison of Boys and Girls
Journal of Religion and Spirituality in Social Work 24,3 (2005): 39-67.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1300/J377v24n03_04#preview
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Haworth Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Adolescent Behavior; Delinquency/Gang Activity; Education; Family Process Measures; Gender Differences; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Parental Influences; Parenting Skills/Styles; Religion; Religious Influences; Substance Use

This study examined the relative influence of religiousness on a sub-sample of adolescents (N = 1911) from a nationally representative sample of youth. Outcome measures included delinquency, substance abuse, physical health, mental health, and education. The study controlled for family processes and peer influences, as well as a variety of sociodemographic factors.

Parent religiosity and family processes, especially parental styles, are found to influence girls more so than boys, while exposure to peer influences affects both boys and girls on all outcome measures except delinquency. Findings highlight gender related similarities and differences that should be taken into account when providing interventions to adolescents and their families.

Bibliography Citation
Caputo, Richard K. "Religiousness and Adolescent Behaviors: A Comparison of Boys and Girls." Journal of Religion and Spirituality in Social Work 24,3 (2005): 39-67.
38. Caputo, Richard K.
Second-Generation Parenthood: A Panel Study of Grandmother and Grandchild Coresidency among Low-Income Families, 1967-1992
Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare 27,3 (September 2000): 3-20.
Also: http://www.wmich.edu/hhs/newsletters_journals/jssw/27-3.htm
Cohort(s): Mature Women
Publisher: Western Michigan University School of Social Work
Keyword(s): Black Family; Black Studies; Coresidence; Divorce; Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC); Ethnic Differences; Family Structure; Family Studies; Grandchildren; Grandmothers; Household Composition; Income Level; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Marital Status; Marriage; Parents, Non-Custodial; Poverty; Racial Differences; Welfare

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Reports findings of a national study of low-income coresident grandmothers & grandchildren, 1967-1992, using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Labor Market Experience, Mature Women's Cohort (N = 5,083 US women, ages 30-44, in 1967). Respondents were first interviewed in 1967, & were continuously interviewed until 1992. Results indicate a small increasing minority of women residing with their grandchildren in low-income families over the study period, although the proportion of those who did declined as they reached retirement age. More than 50% of ever-coresident, low-income grandmothers (N = 776) were second-generation parents for 3+ years; the majority (64%) were black. Among ever-coresident, low-income grandmothers in 1992 (N = 521), being black & being single increased the likelihood of being a second-generation parent. Previous low-income coresidency also predicted low-income coresidency in 1992. Further, older low-income second-generation parents were more likely to reside in skipped vs three-generation families, as were those outside the South. It is argued that low-income coresident grandmothers may be adversely affected by time limits associated with the Personal Responsibility & Work Opportunities Act of 1996 (PRA). Changes to the PRA & the Earned Income Tax Credit are discussed. 3 Tables, 1 Figure, 30 References. Adapted from the source document.
Bibliography Citation
Caputo, Richard K. "Second-Generation Parenthood: A Panel Study of Grandmother and Grandchild Coresidency among Low-Income Families, 1967-1992." Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare 27,3 (September 2000): 3-20.
39. Caputo, Richard K.
Sex at an Early Age: A Multi-System Perspective
Race, Gender and Class 14,3-4 (2007): 206-227.
Also: http://rgc.uno.edu/journal/journal10-16.cfm#Vol%2014%20#3-4
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Southern University at New Orleans Race, Gender and Class Project (SUNO-RGC Project)
Keyword(s): Adolescent Fertility; Age at First Intercourse; Ethnic Differences; Racial Differences; Sexual Activity; Sexual Behavior; Sexual Experiences/Virginity; Socioeconomic Status (SES)

Data from the 1997 cohort of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth were used to assess the association between family, self, proximate extra-familial, and distal extra-familial system factors and abstinence/virginity and age of first sexual intercourse (N=1,854). In addition to family, findings point to the robustness of sociodemographic correlates of gender, race/ethnicity, and SES on abstinence and timing of sexual initiation.
Bibliography Citation
Caputo, Richard K. "Sex at an Early Age: A Multi-System Perspective." Race, Gender and Class 14,3-4 (2007): 206-227.
40. Caputo, Richard K.
The Availability of Traditional and Family-Friendly Employee Benefits among a Cohort of Young Women, 1968-1995
Families in Society: The Journal of Contemporary Human Services 81,4 (July-August 2000): 422-436.
Also: http://www.familiesinsociety.org/ShowAbstract.asp?docid=1037
Cohort(s): Young Women
Publisher: Manticore Publishers
Keyword(s): Benefits; Employment; Employment, History; Job Training

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Based on a nationally representative sample of young women who ever worked between 1968 and 1995 (N = 2,594), findings of a study on the availability of traditional and family-friendly employee benefits are presented. The highest concentrations (70% to 95%) of women held jobs with traditional benefits such as medical coverage, life insurance, and retirement pensions, while the proportions holding jobs with family-friendly benefits such as paid and unpaid maternity leave and flexible work hours were about half that or less. In any given survey year, between 9% and 11% of working women held jobs without benefits, while, over their work histories, 39% had held at least one job without benefits. The effects of 10 correlates on the number of years working women held jobs with specific employee benefits were also assessed. Correlates included age; highest grade completed; number of employers; number of children ever had; race; and years of full-time employment, marriage, public assistance, private-sector employment, and union membership. A positive relationship was found between full-time employment and nearly all employee benefits, while number of children had no effect on all but one benefit, flexible menu of benefits. Most significant, race was found to affect whether working women ever held jobs with certain employee benefits, as well as the number of years they were likely to hold such jobs. Despite longer full-time work histories, Black women were less likely than White women to have jobs with job-related training programs and with several family-friendly benefits. Implications for retaining principles of affirmative actions, workplace strategies, and other policies are discussed.
Bibliography Citation
Caputo, Richard K. "The Availability of Traditional and Family-Friendly Employee Benefits among a Cohort of Young Women, 1968-1995." Families in Society: The Journal of Contemporary Human Services 81,4 (July-August 2000): 422-436.
41. Caputo, Richard K.
The Earned Income Tax Credit: A Study of Eligible Participants vs. Non-participants
Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare 33,1 (March 2006): 9-29.
Also: http://www.wmich.edu/hhs/newsletters_journals/jssw/33-1.htm
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Western Michigan University School of Social Work
Keyword(s): Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC); Food Stamps (see Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program); Gender; Marital Status; Poverty; Racial Differences; Residence; Self-Employed Workers; Socioeconomic Factors; Taxes

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, this study (N = 1,504) showed that about half the EITC eligible tax filers in 2001 did not file EITC tax returns and that differences between EITC tax filers and non-EITC tax filers varied by birth place, Food Stamp program participation, marital status, race, residence, sex, socioeconomic history, and worker classification. Findings suggested that the EITC is well targeted in the sense that economically marginalized groups are likely to participate and that increased outreach efforts are also needed to ensure greater participation among tax filers eligible for the EITC but who are less likely to claim it, especially self-employed persons and those residing in the Northeast. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Bibliography Citation
Caputo, Richard K. "The Earned Income Tax Credit: A Study of Eligible Participants vs. Non-participants." Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare 33,1 (March 2006): 9-29.
42. Caputo, Richard K.
The Effects of Parent Religiosity, Family Processes, and Peer Influences on Adolescent Outcomes by Race/Ethnicity
American Journal of Pastoral Counseling 7,3 (2004): 23-49.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1300/J062v07n03_03
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Haworth Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Adolescent Behavior; Parental Influences; Peers/Peer influence/Peer relations; Racial Differences; Religious Influences

This study examined the effects of parent religiosity, family processes, and peer influences on a nationally representative sample of adolescents stratified by ethnicity/race in light of social control and social learning theories (N=1,911). Findings revealed the differential impact of parent religiosity, family processes, and peer influences on delinquency, substance abuse, physical and mental health, and educational attainment of adolescents stratified by ethnicity/race. On the whole, findings provided evidence of conditions under which social control vs. social learning theories might be better guides to therapeutic interventions that incorporate religious components, while they also highlighted limitations or boundaries of related practices.
Bibliography Citation
Caputo, Richard K. "The Effects of Parent Religiosity, Family Processes, and Peer Influences on Adolescent Outcomes by Race/Ethnicity." American Journal of Pastoral Counseling 7,3 (2004): 23-49.
43. Caputo, Richard K.
The Effects of Race and Marital Status on Child Support and Work Effort
Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare 23,3 (September 1996): 51-68
Cohort(s): Young Women
Publisher: Western Michigan University School of Social Work
Keyword(s): Child Support; Divorce; Family Income; Marital Status; Welfare

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study used data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Labor Market Experience (NLSLME) Young Women's (cohort to assess the influence of race and marital status on levels of child support and work effort of recipients of child support in 1978, 1983, 1988, and 1991. Controlling for the number of children and highest completed grade of education the study found that race exerted no effect on either level of child support payments or work effort in any of the study years. Marital status influenced level of child support t in each study year and work effort only in 1983 Formerly-married mother had the highest levels of child support as a part of total family income in each study year; while married and never-married recipients of child support had similar lower levels. Also formerly-married mothers had the greatest work effort only in 1983. Implications for child support policies are discussed.
Bibliography Citation
Caputo, Richard K. "The Effects of Race and Marital Status on Child Support and Work Effort." Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare 23,3 (September 1996): 51-68.
44. Caputo, Richard K.
The Effects of Socioeconomic Status, Perceived Discrimination and Mastery of Health Status in a Youth Cohort
Social Work in Health Care 37,2 (2003): 17-42.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1300/J010v37n02_02
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Haworth Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Disadvantaged, Economically; Discrimination; Health, Mental; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Life Course; Socioeconomic Background; Socioeconomic Status (SES)

This study examined the influence of socioeconomic status, perceived discrimination, and sense of mastery over one's life on the health status of a subsample of a US cohort of youth (N=969). When controlling for a variety of social characteristics and personal attributes, only sense of mastery over one's life, measured by the Pearlin Mastery Scale, affected physical and mental health statuses. Perceived discrimination, affected only mental health status, while SES over the life course affected only physical health. Findings affirmed the efforts of professions like social work that stress self-determination and empowerment enabling individuals to enhance their own social function and improve conditions in their communities and in society at large. They also suggested that in regard to mental health advocacy efforts to decrease health disparities can find social justice related grounds based on gender.
Bibliography Citation
Caputo, Richard K. "The Effects of Socioeconomic Status, Perceived Discrimination and Mastery of Health Status in a Youth Cohort." Social Work in Health Care 37,2 (2003): 17-42.
45. Caputo, Richard K.
The GED as a Predictor of Mid-Life Health and Economic Well-Being
Journal of Poverty 9,4 (December 2005): 73-97.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1300/J134v09n04_05
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Haworth Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Depression (see also CESD); Economic Well-Being; Family Income; GED/General Educational Diploma/General Equivalency Degree/General Educational Development; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Human Capital; Illnesses; Self-Reporting; Sociability/Socialization/Social Interaction

Guided by human capital, socialization, and institutionalization theories, this study examined mid-life health and economic well-being of General Education Development (GED) certificate recipients. Relying on a study sample (N = 1,927) obtained from the 1979 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, GED recipients were found to have worse mid-life outcomes than conventional high school graduates on measures of family income and depression and to have better mid-life outcomes than high school dropouts on measures of assets, family income, depression, and self-reported physical illnesses. Findings suggested that GED recipients should not be unnecessarily lumped together with high school graduates and that programs and services targeting potential and subsequent GED recipients and high school dropouts to remain in school might not only improve their mid-life labor market and economic outcomes, but also their physical and mental health. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Bibliography Citation
Caputo, Richard K. "The GED as a Predictor of Mid-Life Health and Economic Well-Being." Journal of Poverty 9,4 (December 2005): 73-97.
46. Caputo, Richard K.
The Impact of Intergenerational Head Start Participation on Success Measures Among Adolescent Children
Journal of Family and Economic Issues 25,2 (Summer 2004): 199-223.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/g5m8514278766268/
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Plenum Publishing Corporation
Keyword(s): CESD (Depression Scale); Childhood Education, Early; Depression (see also CESD); Head Start; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Poverty

This study examines the influence of intergenerational Head Start participation on success outcomes among adolescent children of mother-adolescent pairs (N = 1,251). Data come from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY79) and the National Longitudinal Survey's Child-Mother (NLSCM) files. Of 290 adolescents who participated in Head Start as children, one-third (n = 97) had mothers who had also participated in Head Start when they were children. Graduates of Head Start appear roughly comparable to other adolescents in regard to highest grade completed, a sense of mastery, perceived health, and level of depressive symptoms. They do not attain the levels of achievements as other adolescents in regard to reading comprehension and years living above the poverty level.
Bibliography Citation
Caputo, Richard K. "The Impact of Intergenerational Head Start Participation on Success Measures Among Adolescent Children." Journal of Family and Economic Issues 25,2 (Summer 2004): 199-223.
47. Caputo, Richard K.
The Intergenerational Transmission of Grandmother-Grandchild Co-Residency
Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare 28,1 (March 2001): 79-86.
Also: http://www.wmich.edu/hhs/newsletters_journals/jssw/28-1.htm
Cohort(s): Mature Women, Young Women
Publisher: Western Michigan University School of Social Work
Keyword(s): Black Family; Coresidence; Grandchildren; Grandmothers; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Socioeconomic Status (SES)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study examined national data from two women's cohorts to determine the likelihood that Black grandmothers who resided with grandchildren were more likely than other grandmothers were to have daughters who resided with grandchildren. Of 1098 co-resident grandmothers, 390 (36%) were in the younger of the two cohorts, 603 (55%) were in the older, and 105 (9%) were in both, comprising the sub-sample of grandmother-grandchild mother-daughter pairs. A significantly higher proportion of mothers in the grandmother-grandchild mother-daughter pairs were Black (83%) compared to 37% of the mothers among the non-paired ever co-resident grandmothers. The study also found, by proxy, that the co-resident grandmother-grandchild mother-daughter pairs had lower socioeconomic standing than non-paired ever co-resident grandmothers.
Bibliography Citation
Caputo, Richard K. "The Intergenerational Transmission of Grandmother-Grandchild Co-Residency." Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare 28,1 (March 2001): 79-86.
48. Caputo, Richard K.
U.S. Social Welfare Reform: Policy Transitions from 1981 to the Present
International Series on Consumer Science, January 31, 2011.
Also: http://www.springer.com/social+sciences/book/978-1-4419-7673-4?changeHeader
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY97
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Aid for Families with Dependent Children (AFDC); Comprehensive Employment and Training Act (CETA); Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC); Family Studies; Program Participation/Evaluation; Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF); Welfare

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

U.S. Social Welfare Reform examines the evolution of major Federal cash assistance programs to low-income families, from the advent of the Reagan administration to the early Obama years. Written for the professional (but not requiring expertise in quantitative analysis to understand it), it details which programs succeeded, analyzes why others failed, and highlights the need for further reform in the context of today's economic climate....The uniqueness of its scope and presentation suits U.S. Social Welfare Reform to researchers in family relations, family sociology, economics of the family, and social policy, whether the task at hand is reviewing past events or charting a future course of action.
Bibliography Citation
Caputo, Richard K. U.S. Social Welfare Reform: Policy Transitions from 1981 to the Present. International Series on Consumer Science, January 31, 2011..
49. Caputo, Richard K.
Women as Volunteers and Activists
Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly 26,2, (June 1997): 156-174
Cohort(s): Young Women
Publisher: Jossey-Bass
Keyword(s): Social Roles; Volunteer Work; Women

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Data drawn from the National Longitudinal Survey of Labor Market Experience, Young Women's Cohort (N = 5,159) are used to explore characteristics associated with the likelihood of female volunteers engaging in activities to change social conditions & with the likelihood of female activists being volunteers. Results of logistic regression analysis suggest that volunteers are more likely to be activists to the extent that they perceive what they do as making a difference. Furthermore, they are likely to be found in organizations reflecting their own affinity for activism. Work decreases the extent to which women volunteer but does not affect their propensity for activism. Prior volunteer experience partially offsets decreased time devoted to voluntarism due to work. Implications regarding the relationship between voluntarism & activism are discussed, concluding with suggestions for promoting voluntary activism in general. 4 Tables, 2 Appendixes, 48 References. Adapted from the source document. (Copyright 1997, Sociological Abstracts, Inc., all rights reserved.)
Bibliography Citation
Caputo, Richard K. "Women as Volunteers and Activists." Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly 26,2, (June 1997): 156-174.
50. Caputo, Richard K.
Women Who Die Young: The Cumulative Disadvantage of Race
Affilia: Journal of Women and Social Work 19,1 (February 2004): 10-23.
Also: http://aff.sagepub.com/content/19/1/10.abstract
Cohort(s): Young Women
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Ethnic Differences; Ethnic Groups; Ethnic Groups/Ethnicity; Life Course; Minorities; Minority Groups; Mortality; Racial Differences; Women

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The current study used cumulative disadvatage theory to assess the relative influence of race on mortality among 2,288 young women. The findings indicate that race is a robust predictor of women's mortality at young ages even when human, social, personal, institutional, and community capital are accounted for. They suggest that feminists and other advocates for social justice who seek to create more equitable life-course outcomes in the society at large should not ignore race when they conside women's issues.
Bibliography Citation
Caputo, Richard K. "Women Who Die Young: The Cumulative Disadvantage of Race." Affilia: Journal of Women and Social Work 19,1 (February 2004): 10-23.
51. Caputo, Richard K.
Working and Poor: A Panel Study of Maturing Adults in the U.S.
Families in Society: The Journal of Contemporary Human Services 88,3 (July-September 2007): 351-359.
Also: http://www.familiesinsociety.org/ShowAbstract.asp?docid=3644
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Manticore Publishers
Keyword(s): Ethnic Differences; Family Income; Gender Differences; Poverty; Racial Differences; Social Environment; Socioeconomic Factors

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study uses data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth and highlights the extent of poverty and working poverty between 1986 and 2004 (N = 5,164). Over one third (34.2%) of the study sample lived in a poor family at least one year, and nearly one fourth (24.2%) lived in a working poor family at least one year. In addition, almost three fourths (70.1%) of those who lived in a poor family at least one year also lived at least one year in a working poor family. Differences were found by gender and race/ethnicity. Findings suggest that poverty as a social problem is better formulated in terms of working rather than nonworking poverty and that gender and race/ethnicity disparities are prevalent. Policy options, such as expansion of the earned income tax credit and implementation of a basic income guarantee, are explored. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

Copyright of Families in Society is the property of Alliance for Children and Families and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts)

Bibliography Citation
Caputo, Richard K. "Working and Poor: A Panel Study of Maturing Adults in the U.S." Families in Society: The Journal of Contemporary Human Services 88,3 (July-September 2007): 351-359.
52. Caputo, Richard K.
Cianni, Mary
Correlates of Voluntary vs. Involuntary Part-Time Employment Among US Women
Gender, Work and Organization Special Issue 8,3 (July 2001): 311-325
Cohort(s): Mature Women, Young Women
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing, Inc. => Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Employment, Part-Time; Family Characteristics; Household Structure; Labor Economics; Private Sector; Public Sector; Women; Work Attachment; Work Attitudes

Examines the extent to which type and duration of labor force attachment add to the explanatory power of psychological, demographic, and family household characteristics to predict voluntary vs. involuntary part-time employment of women in the US. Voluntary part-time work is not meant to be construed as charitable, non-paid activities, but rather as part-time work with preference for full-time work, if a suitable job were available. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Labor Market Experience, labor market attachment characteristics added little to predict part-time employment status (involuntary vs. voluntary) and had virtually no effect on the odds of any other correlates on employment status. The major exception was years of unemployment. The longer working women were previously unemployed, the greater the likelihood they were involuntarily employed in part-time jobs. In addition, marriage and private sector employment decreased the likelihood of involuntary part-time employment. Findings suggest that involuntarily part-time employed women appear to be 'settling' for what they can get, namely, part-time jobs and that unmarried part-timers may be viewed as a stigmatized or marginal group more likely to be employed in the public rather than private sector. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2000 APA, all rights reserved).
Bibliography Citation
Caputo, Richard K. and Mary Cianni. "Correlates of Voluntary vs. Involuntary Part-Time Employment Among US Women." Gender, Work and Organization Special Issue 8,3 (July 2001): 311-325.
53. Caputo, Richard K.
Mason, Susan E.
The Role of Intact Family Childhood on Women's Earnings Capacity: Implications for Evidence-Based Practices
Journal of Evidence-Based Social Work 6,3 (July 2009): 244-255.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/15433710802686997
Cohort(s): Young Women
Publisher: Routledge ==> Taylor & Francis (1998)
Keyword(s): Childhood; Children, Home Environment; Divorce; Educational Attainment; Families, Two-Parent; Family Structure; Marriage; Well-Being

This article examines the complexities of working with an evidence-based model to design intervention strategies benefiting individuals and families. It addresses the question, to what extent should the evidence of economic advantage for female children raised in two-parent families influence social work support for practices and policies that encourage marriage? The article reviews current research findings indicating benefits of two-parent families on children's well-being and contemporary policy prescriptions promoting marriage. It presents findings of the authors' study which considers the effects of being raised in an intact family on the economic future of young women. The evidence presented in the literature and found in our own study suggests that promotion of marriage may be a sound intervention strategy for parents interested in the economic advantages for their children later in life. For others, it may be the wrong choice based on women's personal circumstances. The association between early family structure and future well-being is further complicated by large gaps in the data on cultural and family diversity. Suggestions for social work practice are based on the synthesis of the evidence-based model and the values of the profession.
Bibliography Citation
Caputo, Richard K. and Susan E. Mason. "The Role of Intact Family Childhood on Women's Earnings Capacity: Implications for Evidence-Based Practices." Journal of Evidence-Based Social Work 6,3 (July 2009): 244-255.
54. Dolinsky, Arthur Lewis
Caputo, Richard K.
Health and Female Self-Empowerment
Journal of Small Business Management 41,3 (July 2003): 233-241.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/1540-627X.00079/abstract
Cohort(s): Mature Women
Publisher: International Council For Small Business (ICSB)
Keyword(s): Employment; Gender; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Self-Employed Workers; Wages, Women; Women

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study uses data from the Mature Women's Cohort of the National Longitudinal Survey of Labor Market Experience (NLSLME). The sample (n = 1,142) comprises self-employed, wage-earning, and nonemployed women whose cumulative employment is measured by employment status between 1976 and in 1995. Three multivariate regression models, one for each type of employment status, are used to control for sociodemographic and for other factors thought to influence health status in 1995, including health status in 1976. The study finds that unemployment resulted in a significantly negative health status in 1995 compared to women of similar age, while the effect of working for wages results in significantly positive health relative to women of similar age. Self-employment had no statistically significant effect on health status in 1995, thus indicating that the health of the self-employed, while better than that of the nonemployed, substantially was worse than that of wage earners.
Bibliography Citation
Dolinsky, Arthur Lewis and Richard K. Caputo. "Health and Female Self-Empowerment." Journal of Small Business Management 41,3 (July 2003): 233-241.
55. Dolinsky, Arthur Lewis
Caputo, Richard K.
Psychological and Demographic Characteristics as Determinants of Women's Health Insurance Coverage
Journal of Consumer Affairs 31,2 (Winter 1997): 218-237
Cohort(s): Young Women
Publisher: American Council on Consumer Interests (ACCI)
Keyword(s): Benefits, Insurance; Demography; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Marital Status; Psychological Effects; Women's Studies

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The study examines the role of demographic and psychological characteristics in determining women's healthcare insurance coverage. To assess the role of these characteristics, data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Labor Market Experience (NLSLME), Young Women's Cohort, were used considering both a married and not married subsample. Overall, the results indicate that in addition to the influence of previously examined demographic characteristics, the role of psychological attributes is substantial particularly for the not married subsample. Findings suggest that in addition to policy aimed at increasing health insurance coverage by way of considering demographic characteristics policy should also consider psychological attributes.
Bibliography Citation
Dolinsky, Arthur Lewis and Richard K. Caputo. "Psychological and Demographic Characteristics as Determinants of Women's Health Insurance Coverage." Journal of Consumer Affairs 31,2 (Winter 1997): 218-237.
56. Dolinsky, Arthur Lewis
Caputo, Richard K.
O'Kane, Patrick
Competing Effects of Culture and Situation on Welfare Receipt
Social Service Review 63,3 (September 1989): 359-371.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/30012031
Cohort(s): Mature Women, Young Women
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
Keyword(s): Education; Mothers and Daughters; Welfare; Work Experience

Contributing to the long-standing debate about the relative influence of cultural and situational factors on welfare receipt, examined here are the competing effects of these factors. Analysis of microdata from the National Longitudinal Survey of Labor Market Experience for a subset of 549 matched mother-daughter pairs (covering the years 1966-1971 for the mothers and 1976-1979 for the daughters) indicates that both culture and situation influenced welfare receipt. Education and work experience were about three times as important as attitudes in explaining the variance in the number of years that welfare was received. 6 Tables, 2 Appendixes. (Copyright 1990, Sociological Abstracts, Inc., all rights reserved.)
Bibliography Citation
Dolinsky, Arthur Lewis, Richard K. Caputo and Patrick O'Kane. "Competing Effects of Culture and Situation on Welfare Receipt." Social Service Review 63,3 (September 1989): 359-371.
57. Dolinsky, Arthur Lewis
Caputo, Richard K.
Pasumarty, Kishore
Effects of Education on Business Ownership: a Longitudinal Study of Women
Entrepreneurship Theory and Practice 18,1 (Fall 1993): 43-53
Cohort(s): Mature Women
Publisher: Baylor University
Keyword(s): Educational Returns; Self-Employed Workers

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

A study used data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Labor Market Experience (NLSLME) to track the long-term self-employed business ownership experience of women between 1969 and 1984, examining their initial entry into self-employment, their continued survivorship in self-employment, and their reentry into self-employment. According to the results of the study, about two-thirds of the women who enter self-employment leave it after roughly 3 years, and a sizable portion of those women who have not exited self-employment after a few years stay self-employed for the remainder of the study period. The data also reveal a significant degree of reentry into self-employment. Moreover, the incidence of initial entry, continuous stayer, and reentry status among the women in the sample is positively related to educational attainment. The study's implications for efforts to increase business ownership among economically disadvantaged women are discussed.
Bibliography Citation
Dolinsky, Arthur Lewis, Richard K. Caputo and Kishore Pasumarty. "Effects of Education on Business Ownership: a Longitudinal Study of Women." Entrepreneurship Theory and Practice 18,1 (Fall 1993): 43-53.
58. Dolinsky, Arthur Lewis
Caputo, Richard K.
Pasumarty, Kishore
Long-Term Entrepreneurship Patterns: A National Study of Black and White Female Entry and Stayer Status Differences
Journal of Small Business Management 32,1 (January 1994): 18-26
Cohort(s): Mature Women
Publisher: International Council For Small Business (ICSB)
Keyword(s): Black Studies; Minority Groups; Racial Differences; Self-Employed Workers

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This article examines the long-term self-employment rate differences between black and white women in the U.S. Data were taken from the National Longitudinal Survey of Labor Market Experience, that followed a sample of women from 1967-89. The approach uses a decompositional methodology to analyze black/white self-employment rate differences. Decomposition results indicate that differences in the probability of entry and differences in the pool of potential stayers account for about 90 percent of the overall self-employment rate difference between black and white women over the survey years considered. The study found that black women are far less likely to enter entrepreneurship than white women but that once they do they are only marginally less likely to stay. Moreover, the lower black entry probabilities directly translate into a smaller pool of potential black stayers and contribute to the black/white self-employment gap.
Bibliography Citation
Dolinsky, Arthur Lewis, Richard K. Caputo and Kishore Pasumarty. "Long-Term Entrepreneurship Patterns: A National Study of Black and White Female Entry and Stayer Status Differences." Journal of Small Business Management 32,1 (January 1994): 18-26.
59. Mason, Susan E.
Caputo, Richard K.
Marriage and Women's Earnings from Work
Journal of Policy Practice 5,1 (2006): 31-47.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1300/J508v05n01_03#preview
Cohort(s): Young Women
Publisher: Taylor & Francis Group
Keyword(s): Earnings; Earnings, Wives; Income; Marital Stability; Marriage; Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF); Wages, Women

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Marital status and earnings from work for women are studied using the National Longitudinal Surveys (NLS), Young Women's Cohort. The study focuses on how being continuously married affects the earnings of women from young adulthood through their pre-retirement years. Earnings from work are measured by average annual wages between 1968 and 1999. Bivariate findings suggest that marriage and family are associated with lessening the wage-earning potential of women over the life course but multivariate analysis shows no effect beyond that of other measures accounted for in the study. Education and number of hours worked are positively related to earnings outcomes and the number of dependents has a negative effect. Policy makers who are calling for an increase in marriage-promoting activities for TANF recipients are using marriage as a primary solution for eliminating poverty and thereby ignoring real ways to help women earn more for themselves and their families. The use of TANF funds for encouraging marriage in general is also of questionable economic advantage to non-welfare women.
Bibliography Citation
Mason, Susan E. and Richard K. Caputo. "Marriage and Women's Earnings from Work." Journal of Policy Practice 5,1 (2006): 31-47.