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Author: Venator, Joanna
Resulting in 3 citations.
1. Reeves, Richard V.
Venator, Joanna
Saving Horatio Alger: The Data Behind the Words (and the Lego Bricks)
Social Mobility Memo, Brookings Institution, August 21, 2014.
Also: http://www.brookings.edu/blogs/social-mobility-memos/posts/2014/08/21-data-behind-saving-horatio-alger-reeves
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Brookings Institution
Keyword(s): Income; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Mobility, Economic; Mobility, Social

In both the video and the essay, we've created a series of 'mobility matrices' showing how income status in one generation influences income status in the next. We used a dataset constructed from the Bureau of Labor Statistics' surveys, the 'National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979' (NLSY79) and the 'Children of the NLSY79' (C-NLSY). Mostly, we use the CNLSY, which provides rich data on children born mainly in the 1980s and 90s. But since they are not old enough for us to know their incomes at the age of 40, we impute adult values using the sample from the earlier generation, the NLSY79. (For more information on how we impute these values, see the Guide to the Brookings Social Genome Model by Scott Winship and Stephanie Owen.)
Bibliography Citation
Reeves, Richard V. and Joanna Venator. "Saving Horatio Alger: The Data Behind the Words (and the Lego Bricks)." Social Mobility Memo, Brookings Institution, August 21, 2014.
2. Reeves, Richard V.
Venator, Joanna
Howard, Kimberly
The Character Factor: Measures and Impact of Drive and Prudence
Report, Center on Children and Families, The Brookings Institution, October 22, 2014
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Brookings Institution
Keyword(s): Adolescent Behavior; Age at Birth; Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Educational Attainment; Educational Outcomes; Gender Differences; High School Completion/Graduates; Motivation; Noncognitive Skills; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading)

There is growing interest among psychologists and economists in the importance of "non-cognitive" skills for doing well in life. In this paper we assess the quality of measures available in US survey data for two specific non-cognitive skills, drive and prudence, which we term "performance character strengths" -- non-cognitive skills that relate to outcomes important for economic mobility, such as educational attainment. We evaluate and rank the measures of drive and prudence found in these surveys, categorizing them as broad or narrow, and indirect or direct. Next, we use one of these measures (the BPI-hyperactivity scale in the NLSY) to look at socioeconomic gaps in performance character strengths, and the relative importance of performance character strengths for educational attainment. We find that family income and maternal education are positively associated with higher levels of performance character strengths, and that the influence of the measure on educational attainment is comparable to the influence of academic scores.
Bibliography Citation
Reeves, Richard V., Joanna Venator and Kimberly Howard. "The Character Factor: Measures and Impact of Drive and Prudence." Report, Center on Children and Families, The Brookings Institution, October 22, 2014.
3. Venator, Joanna
Dual-Earner Migration Patterns: The Role of Locational Compatibility within Households
Presented: Washington DC, Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management (APPAM) Annual Fall Research Conference, November 2018
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management (APPAM)
Keyword(s): Dual-Career Families; Geocoded Data; Migration; Mobility, Residential; Occupations

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

In this paper, I analyze how locational compatibility of married couples' occupations affect their household migration decisions. First, I use indices of occupational agglomeration to explore whether spouses in occupations concentrated in similar regions are more or less likely to move and the implications of this compatibility on their earnings post-move. This descriptive data work suggests that if spouses' careers are concentrated in similar locations or if spouses have similar preferred locations, they are more likely to both earn more and move more. I then build a structural model in which households decide whether to move as a function of occupation- location match and individual location preference shocks. I estimate the model using full information maximum likelihood with data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979, with separate estimation for households with married couples and for households with individuals. Using this model, I show that migration costs vary across occupation groups, with those in occupations that are more locationally disperse having lower migration costs. I then use the parameters estimates from the married couple's model and the individual's model to show that differences in migration rates across household types is not associated with systematically different preferences for married versus single individuals, but instead due to the increased costs of moving when a household has two people's preferences to consider and the mismatch in returns to migration by occupation and location within a household.
Bibliography Citation
Venator, Joanna. "Dual-Earner Migration Patterns: The Role of Locational Compatibility within Households." Presented: Washington DC, Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management (APPAM) Annual Fall Research Conference, November 2018.