Search Results

Author: Billari, Francesco
Resulting in 4 citations.
1. Billari, Francesco
Sironi, Maria
Internet and the Timing of Births
Presented: Washington DC, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, March-April 2016
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Computer Use; Fertility

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Technological innovations directly related to fertility have been explicitly linked to the timing of births, i.e. with postponement in the case of contraceptive technology and with "recuperation" in the case of assisted reproductive technology. We argue that the diffusion of the Internet also plays a role as an "enabling" factor in fertility choices, with a potential effect on the timing of fertility. After discussing the pathways, we hypothesize Internet access to contribute to lowering fertility in earlier ages and stages of the life course, and to raising fertility in later ages and stages of the life course. We also hypothesize that these age- and stage-specific effects are stratified by gender and socioeconomic status. We conduct analyses using longitudinal data from the US (NLSY97) to assess these hypotheses.
Bibliography Citation
Billari, Francesco and Maria Sironi. "Internet and the Timing of Births." Presented: Washington DC, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, March-April 2016.
2. Macmillan, Ross
Billari, Francesco
Furstenberg, Frank
Stability and Change in the Transition to Adulthood: A Latent Structure Analysis of Three Generations in the National Longitudinal Surveys
Presented: San Francisco CA, Population Association of America Meetings, May 2012
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Life Course; Modeling, Growth Curve/Latent Trajectory Analysis; Transition, Adulthood

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

A key issue in the demography of the life course is the transition to adulthood in the latter quarter of the 20th Century. Viewed as an increasingly problematic enterprise, researchers point to modal shifts in the timing of roles, diminished or delayed role attainments, and the uncoupling of roles over time among recent generations. Using latent structure approaches, we model the multidimensional, longitudinal processes of role transitions across three generations of Americans drawn from the National Longitudinal Surveys (1966-2008). In formally modelling the longitudinal structure of the transition to adulthood, we pay explicit attention to within-group and between-group heterogeneity to map continuity and change over time. Results reveal the enduring importance of institutional contexts in the shaping of pathways, the important role of social and economic resources in determining pathways into adulthood, and the important connection between the two in shaping broad patterns of inequality through the life course.
Bibliography Citation
Macmillan, Ross, Francesco Billari and Frank Furstenberg. "Stability and Change in the Transition to Adulthood: A Latent Structure Analysis of Three Generations in the National Longitudinal Surveys." Presented: San Francisco CA, Population Association of America Meetings, May 2012.
3. Mooyaart, Jarl
Liefbroer, Aart C.
Billari, Francesco
Becoming Overweight and Obese in Early Adulthood: The Role of Career and Family Trajectories
Presented: Chicago IL, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April 2017
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Career Patterns; Family Formation; Obesity; Transition, Adulthood; Weight

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study examines the extent to which family and career trajectories during the transition to adulthood (age 17 to 25) influence the risk of becoming overweight or obese in early adulthood (age 28). We separate analyses by gender and control race, parental SES and family structure. We use data from NLSY97 (N=4700) to first identify typical trajectories using sequence analysis, and subsequently investigate whether career or family trajectories are associated with becoming overweight or obese in early adulthood. Results indicate that for women mainly career trajectories, for men family pathways matter in terms of the risk for overweight and obesity. Family background shows little effect with the exception of race.
Bibliography Citation
Mooyaart, Jarl, Aart C. Liefbroer and Francesco Billari. "Becoming Overweight and Obese in Early Adulthood: The Role of Career and Family Trajectories." Presented: Chicago IL, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April 2017.
4. Sironi, Maria
Billari, Francesco
Stay with Mommy and Daddy or Move Out? Consequences of the Age at Leaving Home in the United States
Presented: San Diego CA, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April-May 2015
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Employment; Residence; Transition, Adulthood

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Leaving the parental home is a milestone in the transition to adulthood. Changes over time in the timing of leaving and the increasing share of young adults who return back home have been well documented. However, there is little research investigating the consequences of the timing and pathway of leaving home. We address this gap, examining the relationship between the timing and pathway of leaving home and economic and employment outcomes in early thirties. We use the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY97), taking advantage of its longitudinal design and study young Americans born between 1980 and 1984, who are 27-31 years old in 2011. We find that the higher the age at leaving home the better are the working and especially the economic conditions of individuals between 27 and 31 years of age, albeit with a potential reversal of the effect at later ages of leaving home.
Bibliography Citation
Sironi, Maria and Francesco Billari. "Stay with Mommy and Daddy or Move Out? Consequences of the Age at Leaving Home in the United States." Presented: San Diego CA, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April-May 2015.