Search Results

Author: Seixas, Noah
Resulting in 1 citation.
1. Patil, Divya
Enquobahrie, Daniel A.
Peckham, Trevor
Seixas, Noah
Hajat, Anjum
Retrospective Cohort Study of the Association between Maternal Employment Precarity and Infant Low Birth Weight in Women in the USA
Epidemiology 10,1 (January 2020): DOI: 10.1136/bmjopen-2019-029584.
Also: https://bmjopen.bmj.com/content/10/1/e029584
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: BMJ Publishing Group, Ltd. - British Medical Journal Publishing Group
Keyword(s): Benefits, Insurance; Birthweight; Ethnic Differences; Income Level; Maternal Employment; Modeling, Poisson (IRT–ZIP); Pre-natal Care/Exposure; Racial Differences; Unions; Work Hours

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Objectives: To investigate the association between maternal employment precarity and infant low birth weight (LBW), and to assess if this association differs by race/ethnicity.

Methods: Data were collected from 2871 women enrolled in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 and the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 Children and Young Adult Cohort. Employment precarity was evaluated using a summary variable that combined several employment attributes: availability of employer-sponsored insurance, income, long shifts, non-daytime shifts, availability of employer sponsored training or educational benefits and membership in a union or collective bargaining unit. Employment precarity scores (a sum of the number of negative employment attributes) were categorised into low (0–2), medium (3) and high (4-6). LBW was defined as weight less than 2500 g at birth. Modified Poisson models were fit to calculate risk ratios and 95% CIs and adjusted for maternal age, race/ethnicity, educational attainment, nativity, prepregnancy body mass index, alcohol consumption, smoking during pregnancy and infant year of birth. We assessed effect modification by maternal race/ethnicity using a composite exposure-race variable.

Results: Women with high employment precarity had higher risk of a LBW delivery compared with women with low employment precarity (RR: 1.48, 95% CI: 1.11 to 1.98). Compared to non-Hispanic/non-black women with low employment precarity, non-Hispanic black women (RR: 2.68; 95% CI: 1.72 to 4.15), Hispanic women (RR: 2.53; 95% CI: 1.54 to 4.16) and non-Hispanic/non-black women (RR: 1.46; 95% CI: 0.98 to 2.16) with high employment precarity had higher risk of LBW.

Bibliography Citation
Patil, Divya, Daniel A. Enquobahrie, Trevor Peckham, Noah Seixas and Anjum Hajat. "Retrospective Cohort Study of the Association between Maternal Employment Precarity and Infant Low Birth Weight in Women in the USA." Epidemiology 10,1 (January 2020): DOI: 10.1136/bmjopen-2019-029584.