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Author: Sanzenbacher, Geoffrey
Resulting in 4 citations.
1. Beauchamp, Andrew
Sanzenbacher, Geoffrey
Seitz, Shannon
Skira, Meghan
Deadbeat Dads
Boston College Working Papers in Economics No. 859, Department of Economics, Boston College, July 2014
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Boston College
Keyword(s): Child Support; Childbearing, Premarital/Nonmarital; Earnings; Fatherhood; Fathers, Absence; Racial Differences

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Why do some men father children outside of marriage but not provide support? Why are some single women willing to have children outside of marriage when they receive little or no support from unmarried fathers? Why is this behavior especially common among blacks? To shed light on these questions, we develop and estimate a dynamic equilibrium model of marriage, employment, fertility, and child support. We consider the extent to which low earnings and a shortage of single men relative to single women among blacks can explain the prevalence of deadbeat dads and non-marital childbearing. We estimate the model by indirect inference using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979. We simulate three distinct counterfactual policy environments: perfect child support enforcement, eliminating the black-white earnings gap, and equalizing black-white population supplies (and therefore gender ratios). We find perfect enforcement reduces non-marital childbearing dramatically, particularly among blacks; over time it translates into many fewer couples living with children from past relationships, and therefore less deadbeat fatherhood. Eliminating the black-white earnings gap reduces the marriage rate difference between blacks and whites by 29 to 43 percent; black child poverty rates fall by nearly 40 percent. Finally equalizing gender ratios has little effect on racial differences in marriage and fertility.
Bibliography Citation
Beauchamp, Andrew, Geoffrey Sanzenbacher, Shannon Seitz and Meghan Skira. "Deadbeat Dads." Boston College Working Papers in Economics No. 859, Department of Economics, Boston College, July 2014.
2. Beauchamp, Andrew
Sanzenbacher, Geoffrey
Seitz, Shannon
Skira, Meghan
Single Moms and Deadbeat Dads: The Role of Earnings, Marriage Market Conditions, and Preference Heterogeneity
International Economic Review 59,1 (February 2018): 191-232.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/iere.12267/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing, Inc. => Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Child Support; Fathers; Mothers; Parents, Non-Custodial; Parents, Single; Racial Differences

Why do some men father children outside of marriage without providing support? Why do some women have children outside of marriage when they receive little support from fathers? Why is this behavior more common among blacks than whites? We estimate a dynamic equilibrium model of marriage, employment, fertility, and child support decisions. We consider the extent to which low earnings, marriage market conditions, and preference heterogeneity explain non-marital childbearing, deadbeat fatherhood, and racial differences in these outcomes. We find the black-white earnings gap and preference heterogeneity explain a substantial portion of racial differences, while marriage market conditions are less important.
Bibliography Citation
Beauchamp, Andrew, Geoffrey Sanzenbacher, Shannon Seitz and Meghan Skira. "Single Moms and Deadbeat Dads: The Role of Earnings, Marriage Market Conditions, and Preference Heterogeneity." International Economic Review 59,1 (February 2018): 191-232.
3. Rutledge, Matthew S.
Sanzenbacher, Geoffrey
Vitagliano, Francis M.
Do Young Adults with Student Debt Save Less for Retirement?
Issue in Brief 18-13, Center for Retirement Research at Boston College, June 2018.
Also: https://dlib.bc.edu/islandora/object/bc-ir:108128
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Center for Retirement Research at Boston College
Keyword(s): College Graduates; Debt/Borrowing; Retirement; Savings; Student Loans

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The brief's key findings are: (1) Student debt nearly tripled in real terms from 2005 to 2017, creating a financial burden that could potentially hamper retirement saving by young adults. (2) The analysis looked at the impact of student debt on 401(k) participation and assets for young workers who attended college, both graduates and non-graduates. (3) The results showed that student debt does not significantly affect 401(k) participation rates for either group. (4) However, student debt does seem to affect how much college graduates save: those with debt have only about half as much in assets by age 30 as those without debt.
Bibliography Citation
Rutledge, Matthew S., Geoffrey Sanzenbacher and Francis M. Vitagliano. "Do Young Adults with Student Debt Save Less for Retirement?" Issue in Brief 18-13, Center for Retirement Research at Boston College, June 2018.
4. Rutledge, Matthew S.
Sanzenbacher, Geoffrey
Zulkarnain, Alice
How Secure Is the Retirement of Contingent Workers?
Presented: Chicago IL, Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management (APPAM) Annual Fall Research Conference, November 2017
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management (APPAM)
Keyword(s): Employment, Intermittent; Health and Retirement Study (HRS); Retirement; Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP); Work, Atypical; Work, Contingent

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Recent research suggests the share of workers in contingent work -- broadly defined as contract, temporary, or on-call work -- is on the rise. But no research has focused on the association between contingent work and retirement security, because no single U.S. data source combines information on contingent work and detailed retirement security information for the full population of workers. To get around this issue, this paper analyzes three data sources that together provide an assessment of the extent to which contingent workers are able to prepare for retirement: 1) the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, which follows one group of workers from early career into their late 40s and early 50s; 2) a more age-representative sample from the Survey of Income and Program Participation; and 3) Health and Retirement Study respondents at ages 50-61.
Bibliography Citation
Rutledge, Matthew S., Geoffrey Sanzenbacher and Alice Zulkarnain. "How Secure Is the Retirement of Contingent Workers?" Presented: Chicago IL, Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management (APPAM) Annual Fall Research Conference, November 2017.