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Author: Sandberg-Thoma, Sara
Resulting in 3 citations.
1. Sandberg-Thoma, Sara
Kamp Dush, Claire M.
Serial Cohabitation and Depressive Symptoms in Emerging Adulthood
Presented: New Orleans LA, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April 2013
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Cohabitation; Depression (see also CESD); Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The prevalence of serial cohabitation has increased within the United States; additionally, the rates of serial cohabitation, or cohabiting with more than one partner, have also risen. However, serial cohabitation may have adverse emotional health consequences. In general, cohabitation has been associated with mental health declines, yet serial cohabitation may be driving this effect. Using a contemporary sample of emerging adults, the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 (NLSY97; n = 7,528), we examine the influence of serial cohabitation on depressive symptoms. Pooled fixed effects regressions indicated that serial cohabitation is associated with decreased depressive symptoms. Furthermore, the cumulative number of serial cohabitations did moderate the association between experiencing a specific cohabitation transition (from no reported cohabiting unions to one cohabitation, and from one cohabitation to two cohabitations)and depressive symptoms; future cohabitations did magnify the association between each single cohabitation transition and depressive symptoms.
Bibliography Citation
Sandberg-Thoma, Sara and Claire M. Kamp Dush. "Serial Cohabitation and Depressive Symptoms in Emerging Adulthood." Presented: New Orleans LA, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April 2013.
2. Sandberg-Thoma, Sara
Kotila, Letitia
Life Events and Mental Health at the Transition to Parenthood
Presented: Phoenix AZ, National Council on Family Relations Annual Conference, October-November 2012
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: National Council on Family Relations
Keyword(s): Health Factors; Health, Mental; Parenthood; Stress

The transition to parenthood is a normative, yet stressful life event, where some individuals appear more at-risk for declines in mental health. The accumulation of undesirable life events at this critical time period may explain the occurrence of mental health discrepancies.Using the NLSY97 dataset, we assess relations between life events and mental health at the transition to parenthood. Preliminary results indicate that undesirable life events experienced during the time of childbirth are associated with poor mental health; no association was found for desirable life events. Future analyses plan to address the nature of these associations. Practical implications are discussed.
Bibliography Citation
Sandberg-Thoma, Sara and Letitia Kotila. "Life Events and Mental Health at the Transition to Parenthood." Presented: Phoenix AZ, National Council on Family Relations Annual Conference, October-November 2012.
3. Sandberg-Thoma, Sara
Snyder, Anastasia R.
Jang, Bohyun
Exiting and Returning to the Parental Home for Boomerang Kids
Journal of Marriage and Family 77,3 (June 2015): 806-818.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jomf.12183/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing, Inc. => Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Economic Independence; Exits; Health, Mental; Life Course; Residence, Return to Parental Home/Delayed Homeleaving; Transition, Adulthood

Young adults commonly exit from and return to the parental home, yet few studies have examined the motivation behind these exits and returns using a life course framework. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997, the authors examined associations between mental health problems and economic characteristics and exits from (n = 8,162) and returns to (n = 6,530) the parental home during the transition to adulthood. The average age of the respondents was 24 years. The authors found evidence that mental health and economic characteristics were related to home leaving and returning. Emotional distress was associated with earlier exits from and returns to the parental home; alcohol problems were associated with earlier returns to the parental home. The findings regarding economic resources were unexpectedly mixed. Greater economic resources were linked to delayed exits from and earlier returns to the parental home. The implications of these findings for young adults are discussed.
Bibliography Citation
Sandberg-Thoma, Sara, Anastasia R. Snyder and Bohyun Jang. "Exiting and Returning to the Parental Home for Boomerang Kids." Journal of Marriage and Family 77,3 (June 2015): 806-818.