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Author: Remster, Brianna
Resulting in 4 citations.
1. Massoglia, Michael
Remster, Brianna
King, Ryan D.
Stigma or Separation? Understanding the Incarceration-Divorce Relationship
Social Forces 90,1 (September 2011): 133-155.
Also: http://sf.oxfordjournals.org/content/90/1/133.abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Oxford University Press
Keyword(s): Divorce; Incarceration/Jail; Marital Conflict; Marital Dissolution

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Prior research suggests a correlation between incarceration and marital dissolution, although questions remain as to why this association exists. Is it the stigma associated with “doing time” that drives couples apart? Or is it simply the duration of physical separation that leads to divorce? This research utilizes data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY79) and the Survey of Officer and Enlisted Personnel to shed light on these questions. The findings generally support a separation explanation of the incarceration-divorce relationship. Specifically, the data show that exposure to incarceration has no effect on marital dissolution after duration of incarceration is taken into account. In addition, across both datasets we find that individuals who spend substantial time away from spouses are at higher risk of divorce. The findings point to the importance of spousal separation for understanding the incarceration-marital dissolution relationship. Moreover, and in contrast to settings in which stigma appears quite salient (e.g., labor markets), our results suggest that the shared history and degree of intimacy among married partners may weaken the salience of the stigma of incarceration. Findings are discussed in the context of a burgeoning body of work on the collateral consequences of incarceration and have implications for the growing pool of men in American society returning from prison.
Bibliography Citation
Massoglia, Michael, Brianna Remster and Ryan D. King. "Stigma or Separation? Understanding the Incarceration-Divorce Relationship." Social Forces 90,1 (September 2011): 133-155.
2. Remster, Brianna
Hodges, Melissa J.
Labor Market Double Jeopardy: The Gendered Effect of Incarceration on Wages
Presented: Atlanta GA, American Society of Criminology Annual Meeting, November 2018
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: American Society of Criminology
Keyword(s): Gender Differences; Human Capital; Incarceration/Jail; Wage Penalty/Career Penalty

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Research finds that incarceration is associated with reduced wages for men, yet it is unknown whether this extends to formerly incarcerated women, despite evidence that women experience the consequences of incarceration differently than men. Analyzing data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY79), this study investigates (1) the relative size of the incarceration wage penalty by gender and (2) whether the explanatory mechanisms for the penalty differ for women compared to men. Findings indicate that the net penalty for formerly incarcerated women is roughly double the size of the penalty for formerly incarcerated men. Moreover, there are gender differences in the mechanisms shaping the wage penalty. Although human capital explains the bulk of the penalty for both men and women, women's penalty is in part higher because of their role as primary caregivers. Further, the stigma of incarceration appears more consequential for women's wages than men's. These findings illustrate the need for more research that applies a gendered lens to the consequences of incarceration.
Bibliography Citation
Remster, Brianna and Melissa J. Hodges. "Labor Market Double Jeopardy: The Gendered Effect of Incarceration on Wages." Presented: Atlanta GA, American Society of Criminology Annual Meeting, November 2018.
3. Remster, Brianna
Hodges, Melissa J.
The Gendered Effect of Incarceration on Wages
Presented: Montreal, QC, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2017
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Gender Differences; Incarceration/Jail; Wage Penalty/Career Penalty

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Despite a growing body of research on the consequences of incarceration, most systematic studies are limited to men. This shortcoming persists notwithstanding several theoretical traditions suggesting that women may experience the consequences of incarceration differently than men. A primary example is research on the incarceration wage penalty; studies find that men who have been incarcerated earn less over time than never incarcerated men. Yet women have different amounts of human and social capital and work experience and may face greater stigma post release than men. This study addresses this gap in the literature by assessing (1) whether women experience an incarceration wage penalty and how it compares to men's and (2) whether wage penalty mechanisms differ for women compared to men. Using data uses from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY79), we find that women experience a stronger wage penalty for incarceration than men. Moreover, the mechanisms work differently. Consistent with prior work, human capital explains the bulk of the penalty for men, while a larger residual penalty suggests that stigma is more important for women. These results illustrate the need for applying a gendered lens to consequences of incarceration research.
Bibliography Citation
Remster, Brianna and Melissa J. Hodges. "The Gendered Effect of Incarceration on Wages." Presented: Montreal, QC, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2017.
4. Warner, Cody
Remster, Brianna
Incarceration and the Transition to Residential Independence
Presented: Chicago IL, American Society of Criminology Annual Meeting, November 2012
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: American Society of Criminology
Keyword(s): Housing/Housing Characteristics/Types; Incarceration/Jail; Life Course; Residence

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Incarceration is typically conceptualized as a distinct turning point in the life course. Research shows that a spell of incarceration disrupts important life course transitions, such as entry into stable employment and family formation. Although recent research has also started to explore the residential consequences of incarceration, little is known about the impact that incarceration has on the transition to residential independence. This is a notable oversight, as the transition to an independent household is a key marker of adulthood. Because incarceration diminishes marriage and employment prospects and slows wage growth, we suggest that incarceration could also work to inhibit residential independence. This research draws on data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY79), which contains almost 30 years of correctional and housing histories to explore the effect of a prison spell on the likelihood of residing in an independent household. Our findings suggest that incarceration hinders attainment of independent housing, net of age and other core determinants of living independently. Furthermore, an interaction between age and correctional contact suggests that this relationship may depend on the timing of confinement. Findings are discussed in the context of a growing body of work on the collateral consequences of incarceration.
Bibliography Citation
Warner, Cody and Brianna Remster. "Incarceration and the Transition to Residential Independence." Presented: Chicago IL, American Society of Criminology Annual Meeting, November 2012.