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Author: Qian, Yue
Resulting in 5 citations.
1. Qian, Yue
Educational Assortative Mating and Income Dynamics in Couples: A Longitudinal and Dyadic Perspective
Presented: Seattle WA, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2016
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Assortative Mating; Educational Attainment; Gender Differences; Husbands, Income; Income Dynamics/Shocks; Marriage; Wives, Income

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The reversal of the gender gap in education could have far-reaching consequences for marriage and family lives. This study uses data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 (NLSY79) and longitudinal multilevel dyad models to investigate how the educational pairing of spouses at the time of marriage shapes income dynamics in couples over the marital life course. Husbands' income earned at the start of marriage varies by the educational pairing of spouses, but change in husbands' income with marital duration is very comparable across three types of educational pairings of spouses. For wives, both their initial income at marriage and change in income after marriage vary by the educational pairing of spouses, with wives who marry a less-educated husband than themselves having more positive change in income over the marital life course. These results suggest that it remains important for husbands to bring income into the family no matter what educational levels they have relative to their wives, whereas the rise of women's education and the increasing prevalence of women marrying down in education likely protect women from earning less after marriage.
Bibliography Citation
Qian, Yue. "Educational Assortative Mating and Income Dynamics in Couples: A Longitudinal and Dyadic Perspective." Presented: Seattle WA, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2016.
2. Qian, Yue
Educational Assortative Mating and Income Dynamics in Couples: A Longitudinal Dyadic Perspective
Journal of Marriage and Family 80,3 (June 2018): 607-621.
Also: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/jomf.12470
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Assortative Mating; Educational Attainment; Gender Differences; Husbands, Income; Income Dynamics/Shocks; Marriage; Wives, Income

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The question of how educational assortative mating may transform couples' lives and within-family gender inequality has gained increasing attention. Using 25 waves (1979–2012) of data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 and longitudinal multilevel dyad models, this study investigated how educational assortative mating shapes income dynamics in couples during the marital life course. Couples were grouped into three categories--educational hypergamy (wives less educated than their husbands), homogamy, and hypogamy (wives more educated than their husbands). Results show that change in husbands' income with marital duration is similar across couples, whereas change in wives' income varies by educational assortative mating, with wives in educational hypogamy exhibiting more positive change in income during the marital life course. The finding that husbands' long-term economic advancement is less affected than that of wives by educational assortative mating underscores the gender-asymmetric nature of spousal influence in heterosexual marriages.
Bibliography Citation
Qian, Yue. "Educational Assortative Mating and Income Dynamics in Couples: A Longitudinal Dyadic Perspective." Journal of Marriage and Family 80,3 (June 2018): 607-621.
3. Qian, Yue
Mate Selection in America: Do Spouses' Incomes Converge When the Wife Has More Education?
Ph.D. Dissertation, Department of Sociology, The Ohio State University, 2016
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: ProQuest Dissertations & Theses (PQDT)
Keyword(s): Assortative Mating; Educational Attainment; Gender Differences; Husbands, Income; Marriage; Wives, Income

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The reversal of the gender gap in education has reshaped the U.S. marriage market and could have far-reaching consequences for marriage and family lives. As women increasingly marry men with less education than themselves, does this imply greater economic gender equality in marriage? My dissertation takes a life course approach to answer this question. First, I examine gender asymmetry in educational and income assortative mating patterns among newlyweds. I use log-linear models to analyze data from the 1980 U.S. Census and the 2008–2012 American Community Surveys.

Second, I investigate how educational assortative mating shapes husbands and wives income trajectories over the course of marriage. I use multilevel dyad models to analyze data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 (NLSY79). Educational assortative mating is captured by three types of educational pairings of spouses: educational hypergamy in which the wife is less educated than the husband, educational homogamy in which both spouses have same levels of education, and educational hypogamy in which the wife is more educated than the husband. I find that change in husbands income with marital duration was similar regardless of educational pairings of spouses, whereas change in wives income varied by educational pairings of spouses such that wives in educational hypogamy exhibited more positive change in income over the marital life course. The findings suggest that it remains important for husbands to bring income into the family no matter what educational levels they have relative to their wives, whereas the rise in women's education and in prevalence of educational hypogamy likely protects women from earning less after marriage.

Lastly, I examine how educational assortative mating shapes patterns of female breadwinning status over the course of marriage. I use group-based trajectory models to analyze data from the NLSY79. I find substantial movement in and out of the primary breadwinner role by wives across marital years and great heterogeneity in trajectories of female breadwinning status across couples. In addition, educational assortative mating plays a role in shaping patterns of female breadwinning status: educationally hypogamous couples are less likely than educationally homogamous or hypergamous couples to follow the traditional trajectory characterized by virtually no chance of achieving a female breadwinning arrangement over the first twenty years of marriage.

Bibliography Citation
Qian, Yue. Mate Selection in America: Do Spouses' Incomes Converge When the Wife Has More Education? Ph.D. Dissertation, Department of Sociology, The Ohio State University, 2016.
4. Qian, Yue
Fan, Wen
Student Loans, Mental Health, and Substance Use: A Gender Comparison among US Young Adults
Journal of American College Health published online (23 April 2021): DOI: 10.1080/07448481.2021.1909046.
Also: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/07448481.2021.1909046
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Taylor & Francis Group
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Gender Differences; Health, Mental; Smoking (see Cigarette Use); Student Loans

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Student loan debt has become a growing crisis. Considering that women are more likely than men to take on student loans and more likely to take on larger amounts, we examine whether the effects of student loans on young adults’ mental health and substance use differ by gender. Participants: We used the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 (NLSY97) data collected from 1997 to 2015. The NLSY97 consists of a nationally representative sample of American youths born between 1980 and 1984. Participants included 2,607 men and 3,004 women who reported college enrollment. Methods: We analyzed data using hybrid regression models. Results: Student loans have more negative effects on young men than young women, in terms of mental health problems, smoking, and heavy drinking. Particularly, young men tend to increase substance use in response to cumulative loan amounts. Conclusions: Borrowing patterns and the health consequences of student loans are gendered.
Bibliography Citation
Qian, Yue and Wen Fan. "Student Loans, Mental Health, and Substance Use: A Gender Comparison among US Young Adults." Journal of American College Health published online (23 April 2021): DOI: 10.1080/07448481.2021.1909046.
5. Qian, Yue
Yavorsky, Jill E.
The Under-Utilization of Women's Talent: Academic Achievement and Future Leadership Positions
Social Forces published online (18 January 2021): DOI: 10.1093/sf/soaa126.
Also: https://academic.oup.com/sf/advance-article-abstract/doi/10.1093/sf/soaa126/6103179
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Oxford University Press
Keyword(s): Achievement; Gender Attitudes/Roles; Gender Differences; Grade Point Average (GPA)/Grades; Job Promotion; Maternal Employment

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Despite high labor force participation, women remain underrepresented in leadership at every level. In this study, we examine whether women and men who show early academic achievement during their adolescence--and arguably signs of future leadership potential--have similar or different pathways to later leadership positions in the workplace. We also examine how leadership patterns by gender and early academic achievement differ according to parenthood status. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979, we find that overall, men supervise more people than women at work during their early-to-mid careers, regardless of their grade point averages (GPAs) in high school. In addition, among men and women who are parents, early academic achievement is much more strongly associated with future leadership roles for fathers than it is for mothers. Such patterns exacerbate gender gaps in leadership among parents who were top achievers in high school. Indeed, among those who had earned a 4.0 GPA in high school, fathers manage over four times the number of supervisees as mothers do (nineteen vs. four supervisees). Additional analyses focusing on parents suggest that gender leadership gaps by GPA are not attributable to different propensities for taking on leadership roles between the genders but are in part explained by unequal returns to educational attainment and differences in employment-related characteristics by gender. Overall, our results reveal that suppressed leadership prospects apply to even women who show the most promise early-on and highlight the vast under-utilization of women's (in particular mothers') talent for organizational leadership.
Bibliography Citation
Qian, Yue and Jill E. Yavorsky. "The Under-Utilization of Women's Talent: Academic Achievement and Future Leadership Positions." Social Forces published online (18 January 2021): DOI: 10.1093/sf/soaa126.