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Author: McClendon, David
Resulting in 9 citations.
1. McClendon, David
Crossing Boundaries: "Some College," Schools, and Educational Assortative Mating
Journal of Marriage and Family 80,4 (August 2018): 812-825.
Also: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/jomf.12482
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing, Inc. => Wiley Online
Keyword(s): College Degree; College Enrollment; Marriage; Post-Secondary Transcripts; Sociability/Socialization/Social Interaction

As more Americans delay marriage and meet partners online, schools may be less important for educational assortative mating. At the same time, social ties formed during college may continue to shape partner choice later in adulthood. This study focuses on young adults with "some college, no degree" to see what, if any, marriage‐market benefit is gained from exposure to highly educated social networks in college. Using data from the National Longitudinal Study of Youth 1997, including newly collected postsecondary transcripts, the author finds young adults with "some college" are more likely than their less‐educated peers to marry a college graduate, especially if they attended a 4‐year school, but young adults with bachelor's degrees still hold an advantage, even after controlling for duration of schooling. The results support the role of schools in shaping opportunities to meet partners but highlight the value of college degrees on the marriage market.
Bibliography Citation
McClendon, David. "Crossing Boundaries: "Some College," Schools, and Educational Assortative Mating." Journal of Marriage and Family 80,4 (August 2018): 812-825.
2. McClendon, David
Crossing Boundaries: "Some College" and the Role of Schools in Educational Assortative Mating
Presented: Chicago IL, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April 2017
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Educational Attainment; Marriage

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

As more Americans delay marriage and meet romantic partners online, schools may be becoming less important for educational assortative mating. However, although fewer people meet their spouse as students, social ties formed during college may continue to shape partner choice later in adulthood. Here I focus on young adults with "some college, no degree" to see what, if any, marriage-market benefit is gained from exposure to highly-educated social networks in college. Using data from NLSY-1997, including newly collected postsecondary transcripts, I find young adults with “some college” are more likely than their less educated peers to marry a college graduate, especially if they attended a 4-year school. But young adults with bachelor’s degrees still hold an advantage, even after controlling for duration of schooling. The results support the role of schools in shaping opportunities to meet partners but highlight the value of a college degree on the marriage market.
Bibliography Citation
McClendon, David. "Crossing Boundaries: "Some College" and the Role of Schools in Educational Assortative Mating." Presented: Chicago IL, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April 2017.
3. McClendon, David
Getting Married in the Great Recession: Local Contexts and Marriage Formation among U.S. Young Adults
Presented: San Francisco CA, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2014
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): American Community Survey; Cohabitation; Economic Changes/Recession; Economics, Regional; Marriage

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

How has the Great Recession shaped the transition to first marriage among young adults in the United States? In this article, I use the National Longitudinal Study of Youth 1997, in conjunction with the American Community Survey and other data sources, to begin to assess the impact of the recession on young adults’ marriage formation behavior, focusing on the importance of local economic conditions and the supply of economically attractive partners and how these might differ for men and women. Preliminary results indicate that (1) there was a measurable decline in marriage during the period following the recession among young adult men and women, and (2) consistent with research on previous marriage cohorts, local labor and marriage market conditions continue to be consequential for contemporary young adults’ marriage behavior. However, recession-era period effects do not appear to be accounted for by these local conditions. This article also provides a much-needed update to the marriage-market literature in the US with a nationally representative sample of young adults and finds important differences in the effects of the local sex composition on marriage formation between single and cohabiting men and women.
Bibliography Citation
McClendon, David. "Getting Married in the Great Recession: Local Contexts and Marriage Formation among U.S. Young Adults." Presented: San Francisco CA, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2014.
4. McClendon, David
Marriage Markets and Union Formation in the United States: Evidence from Young Adults during the Great Recession
Presented: Boston MA, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, May 2014
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Cohabitation; Economic Changes/Recession; Marriage

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Recent shifts in union formation patterns have made prior research on marriage markets in the US outdated. This paper uses the NLSY-97 to examine how marriage market characteristics, particularly the sex ratio, shape union formation among contemporary young adults. Models of first-union timing indicate the supply of partners is more relevant for women than for men but show variation over the life course: while a partner surplus is associated with cohabitation for women ages 18-23, it is associated with marriage for women 24-31. Furthermore, models of first marriage timing find the sex ratio is unrelated to the transition to marriage among cohabiting women. I also consider measures related to the supply of economically attractive partners in the context of the Great Recession. This study highlights the continued importance of socio-environmental factors for union formation and sheds light on the meanings and uses of cohabitation and marriage among today’s young adults.
Bibliography Citation
McClendon, David. "Marriage Markets and Union Formation in the United States: Evidence from Young Adults during the Great Recession." Presented: Boston MA, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, May 2014.
5. McClendon, David
Religion, Marriage Markets, and Assortative Mating in the United States
Presented: San Diego CA, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April-May 2015
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Geocoded Data; Marriage; Religion

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

As the share of marriages that are interfaith continues to grow, religion is thought to be less important for sorting partners. However, prior studies on religious assortative mating rely on national samples of prevailing marriages, which miss how local marriage markets shape partner selection and its connection to marriage timing. I examine the impact of local religious concentration on religious assortative mating and how it varies by religious tradition and age. I estimate discrete-time competing-risk models of religious assortative mating, using individual level data from the NLSY 1997 and local characteristics from census data and other sources. Results show that local religious concentration is associated with higher odds of religious homogamy relative to non-marriage and heterogamy. While the association varies across religious traditions, it does not vary with age. The findings suggest that religion remains relevant in today's marriage market and have implications for theories of assortative mating.
Bibliography Citation
McClendon, David. "Religion, Marriage Markets, and Assortative Mating in the United States." Presented: San Diego CA, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April-May 2015.
6. McClendon, David
Religion, Marriage Markets, and Assortative Mating in the United States
Journal of Marriage and Family 78,5 (October 2016): 1399-1421.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jomf.12353/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing, Inc. => Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Event History; Geocoded Data; Marriage; Religion

As interfaith marriage has become more common, religion is thought to be less important for sorting partners. Nevertheless, prior studies on religious assortative mating use samples of prevailing marriages, which miss how local marriage markets shape both partner selection and marriage timing. Drawing on search theory and data from 8,699 young adults (ages 18-31 years) in the National Longitudinal Study of Youth 1997, the author examined the association between the concentration of coreligionists in local marriage markets and marriage timing and partner selection using event history methods. Religious concentration is associated with higher odds of transitioning to marriage and religious homogamy (conditional on marriage) for women and men at older ages (24-31 years) but not at younger ages (18-23 years). The association was also stronger for non-Hispanic Whites when compared with other racial and ethnic groups. The findings indicate that religion remains relevant in sorting partners for many young adults in today's marriage market.
Bibliography Citation
McClendon, David. "Religion, Marriage Markets, and Assortative Mating in the United States." Journal of Marriage and Family 78,5 (October 2016): 1399-1421.
7. McClendon, David
Kuo, Janet Chen-Lan
Raley, R. Kelly
Opportunities to Meet: Occupational Education and Marriage Formation in Young Adulthood
Demography 51,4 (August 2014): 1319-1344.
Also: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24980386
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Educational Attainment; Marriage; Modeling, Hazard/Event History/Survival/Duration; Occupational Information Network (O*NET); Occupations

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

We focus on work--and the social ties that it supports--and consider whether the educational composition of occupations is important for marriage formation during young adulthood. Employing discrete-time event-history methods using the NLSY-97, we find that occupational education is positively associated with transitioning to first marriage and with marrying a college-educated partner for women but not for men.
Bibliography Citation
McClendon, David, Janet Chen-Lan Kuo and R. Kelly Raley. "Opportunities to Meet: Occupational Education and Marriage Formation in Young Adulthood." Demography 51,4 (August 2014): 1319-1344.
8. McClendon, David
Kuo, Janet
Raley, Kelly
The Labor of Love: Occupational Education and the Transition to First Marriage
Presented: New Orleans LA, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April 2013
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Cohabitation; College Education; Education; Marriage; Occupations

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Explanations for the marriage gap by educational attainment in the US emphasize the economic and cultural attractiveness of a college degree on the marriage market. However, education may also shape the opportunities that men and women have to meet other college-educated partners, particularly in contexts with significant educational stratification. We focus on work—and the social ties it supports—and consider whether the educational composition of one’s occupation is important for marriage formation. Employing discrete-time event history methods using the NLSY-97, we find that occupational education is positively associated with transitioning to first marriage and with marrying a college-educated partner for women but not for men. This association does not vary by women’s own educational attainment and is not significant for entry into cohabitation. Our approach calls attention to an unexplored, indirect link between education and marriage that, we argue, helps explain why college-educated adults enjoy better marriage prospects.
Bibliography Citation
McClendon, David, Janet Kuo and Kelly Raley. "The Labor of Love: Occupational Education and the Transition to First Marriage." Presented: New Orleans LA, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April 2013.
9. Raley, Kelly
McClendon, David
Steidl, Ellyn
Credits and Credentials: An In-Depth Analysis of the Association between Educational Attainment and the Risk of Divorce
Presented: San Diego CA, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April-May 2015
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): College Enrollment; Divorce; Educational Attainment; Marital Stability

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study uses detailed transcript and self-report data on postsecondary experiences from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 Cohort (NLYS97) to investigate the association between educational attainment and marital stability for men and women. Our preliminary results indicate that incremental educational progress is associated with greater marital stability for women, even when it does not result in a degree. This provides more support for a learning than a credentialism argument. Moreover, years enrolled is not associated with reduced risk of divorce, but credits earned is. This supports the idea that something about what is learned in the classroom might contribute to marital stability, either directly or indirectly through labor force outcomes or spousal characteristics. We conclude with a discussion of future plans.
Bibliography Citation
Raley, Kelly, David McClendon and Ellyn Steidl. "Credits and Credentials: An In-Depth Analysis of the Association between Educational Attainment and the Risk of Divorce." Presented: San Diego CA, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April-May 2015.