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Author: Marr, Christa
Resulting in 2 citations.
1. Kourtellos, Andros
Marr, Christa
Tan, Chih Ming
Local Measures of Intergenerational Mobility of Income, Cognitive, and Noncognitive Skills
Presented: Toulouse, France, European Economic Association and Econometric Society Parallel Meetings, August 2014
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult, NLSY97
Publisher: European Economic Association & Econometric Society
Keyword(s): Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB); Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Family Income; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Noncognitive Skills; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT); Pearlin Mastery Scale; Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES) (see Self-Esteem)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using NLSY data we investigate whether the observed patterns of intergenerational persistence in cognitive and non-cognitive abilities are consistent with the predictions of the genetic hypothesis. In doing so we employ the varying coefficient model to estimate nonparametric (local) measures of intergenerational mobility of income, cognitive, and non-cognitive skills as smooth functions of log parent permanent income. Our findings show that intergenerational mobility exhibits nonlinear patterns. Individuals with different parental income are characterized by different degrees of intergenerational mobility. Moreover, we find evidence that suggests that the genetic component in the overall intergenerational transmission mechanism is much stronger than the epigenetic for both sons and daughters.
Bibliography Citation
Kourtellos, Andros, Christa Marr and Chih Ming Tan. "Local Measures of Intergenerational Mobility of Income, Cognitive, and Noncognitive Skills." Presented: Toulouse, France, European Economic Association and Econometric Society Parallel Meetings, August 2014.
2. Marr, Christa
Exploring Income Inequality in the United States through Redistribution Preferences, Intergenerational Mobility, and Political Polarization
Ph.D. Dissertation, Department of Economics, Clark University, May 2014
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: ProQuest Dissertations & Theses (PQDT)
Keyword(s): Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Behavior Problems Index (BPI); CESD (Depression Scale); Family Income; Gender Differences; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Locus of Control (see Rotter Scale); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT); Pearlin Mastery Scale; Personality/Big Five Factor Model or Traits; Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES) (see Self-Esteem)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The second chapter explores how non-cognitive and cognitive abilities impact intergenerational transmission of income in the United States for sons and daughters. I take advantage of the maternal linkage between two cohorts in the National Longitudinal Survey of the Youth to accurately measure parental and child permanent income and to utilize the rich source of non-cognitive and cognitive abilities available in the data. I propose a "nurture" versus "nature" model to uncover the transmission mechanisms through which personality and cognitive abilities impact mobility. I find that parents' socioeconomic background influences abilities which are then valued on the market (nurture) while abilities are also directly transmitted from mothers to children (nature). Cognitive skills are a stronger transmission mechanism, particularly for daughters, based on these models. Following Nordin and Rooth (2011), I investigate how intergenerational income mobility varies conditional personality and cognitive abilities. I use varying coefficient models to account for observed and unobserved heterogeneity and to illuminate non-linearities and vulnerable populations. Results show that quiet sons and problem daughters from low-income families are more likely to remain poor.
Bibliography Citation
Marr, Christa. Exploring Income Inequality in the United States through Redistribution Preferences, Intergenerational Mobility, and Political Polarization. Ph.D. Dissertation, Department of Economics, Clark University, May 2014.