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Author: Kraft, Joan Marie
Resulting in 5 citations.
1. Coverdill, James E.
Kraft, Joan Marie
Enrollment, Employment, and the Risk and Resolution of a First Premarital Pregnancy
Social Science Quarterly 77,1 (March 1996): 43-59
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: University of Texas Press
Keyword(s): Abortion; Adolescent Fertility; Childbearing; Childbearing, Adolescent; Childbearing, Premarital/Nonmarital; Cohabitation; Educational Status; Employment; Event History; Fertility; Hispanics; Marital Status; Pregnancy and Pregnancy Outcomes; Pregnancy, Adolescent; Racial Differences; Wage Differentials; Work Experience

Permission to reprint the abstract has been denied by the publisher.

Bibliography Citation
Coverdill, James E. and Joan Marie Kraft. "Enrollment, Employment, and the Risk and Resolution of a First Premarital Pregnancy." Social Science Quarterly 77,1 (March 1996): 43-59.
2. Coverdill, James E.
Kraft, Joan Marie
Manley, Kelly Shannon
Employment History, the Sex Typing of Occupations, Pay and Change in Gender-Role Attitudes: A Longitudinal Study of Young Married Women
Sociological Focus 29,1 (February 1996): 47-60.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/pss/20831767
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: North Central Sociological Association ==> Routledge (new in 2012)
Keyword(s): Employment; Employment, History; Gender Differences; Income; Marriage; Occupational Segregation; Sex Roles; Wives; Women's Roles; Women's Studies; Work Experience

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The extent to which employment history & occupational segregation by gender & pay cause young married women's gender-role attitudes to change over time is examined. Longitudinal data are drawn from the youth cohort of the National Longitudinal Survey of Labor Market Experience (1982- 1987) for a national sample of 2,499 women ages 22-29. The results show that (1) employed women were less traditional in their views of women's appropriate roles, (2) the sex typing of occupations does not appear consequential for women's gender-role attitudes over time, & (3) both pay levels & increases alter gender-role attitudes. 4 Tables, 12 References. Adapted from the source document. (Copyright 1997, Sociological Abstracts, Inc., all rights reserved.)
Bibliography Citation
Coverdill, James E., Joan Marie Kraft and Kelly Shannon Manley. "Employment History, the Sex Typing of Occupations, Pay and Change in Gender-Role Attitudes: A Longitudinal Study of Young Married Women." Sociological Focus 29,1 (February 1996): 47-60.
3. Kraft, Joan Marie
Work and Fertility: An Exploration of the Relationship Between Labor Force Participation and Premarital Fertility
Ph.D. Dissertation, Northwestern University, 1989
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: UMI - University Microfilms, Bell and Howell Information and Learning
Keyword(s): Abortion; Behavior; Childbearing, Premarital/Nonmarital; Contraception; Fertility; Labor Force Participation; Marital Status; Maternal Employment; Pregnancy and Pregnancy Outcomes; Sexual Behavior; Wages; Women

This dissertation attempts to add to our knowledge of the causes of premarital fertility behavior--sexual activity, use of birth control, pregnancy, abortion, and marital status at time of birth. Current research pays attention to the roles played by aspirations, social-psychological variables, and community norms in fertility behavior. The approach of this paper differs in its emphasis upon labor force participation and the quality of worklife. The argument is implicit in the literature's concern with why young women "risk the future" by engaging in premarital intercourse that may result in conception. Premarital motherhood can disrupt a woman's life, making it difficult to maintain a current standard of living or attain future goals. The central hypothesis of the dissertation is that young women who work, especially those working in full-time jobs with high wages and high occupational status, will be less likely than other women to engage in potentially risky premarital fertility behaviors. Monthly data on fertility behavior and labor force participation are drawn from the NLSY and cover a span of seven years (1978 through 1984). Event history and logistic regression models suggest that workers are more likely than non-workers to be sexually active, to use birth control, to get abortions, and to marry prior to birth. Workers are less likely than non-workers to become premaritally pregnant. A comparison of workers and non-workers thus supports the opportunity cost argument. Models that include occupational status, wages, and hours worked indicate that the opportunity cost argument has some merit in the prediction of pregnancy and the use of birth control.
Bibliography Citation
Kraft, Joan Marie. Work and Fertility: An Exploration of the Relationship Between Labor Force Participation and Premarital Fertility. Ph.D. Dissertation, Northwestern University, 1989.
4. Kraft, Joan Marie
Coverdill, James E.
Employment and the Use of Birth Control by Sexually Active Single Hispanic, Black, and White Women
Demography 31,4 (November 1994): 593-602.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/w42452h5425883t1/
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Contraception; Education; Educational Aspirations/Expectations; Educational Attainment; Employment; Employment, History; Ethnic Differences; Family Background; Family Studies; Fertility; Hispanics; Racial Differences; Sexual Activity; Wage Effects; Women

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Previous studies of the use of birth control by sexually active single women tend to emphasize family background and aspirations, and restrict their attention to teenagers. This framework is elaborated by considering how labor market experiences might shape the birth control practices of women in their late teens and 20s. Data from the U.S. National Longitudinal Survey of Labor Force Experiences - Youth Cohort provide evidence that employment histories and wages influence birth control practices, net of the effects of family background, aspirations, and educational attainment. Several pronounced racial and ethnic differences are found.
Bibliography Citation
Kraft, Joan Marie and James E. Coverdill. "Employment and the Use of Birth Control by Sexually Active Single Hispanic, Black, and White Women." Demography 31,4 (November 1994): 593-602.
5. Kraft, Joan Marie
Coverdill, James E.
Employment, Job Characteristics, and the Use of Birth Control by Sexually Active, Never-Married Black, Hispanic, and White Women
Presented: Cincinnati, OH, American Sociological Association Annual Meetings, August 1991
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Childbearing, Premarital/Nonmarital; Contraception; Hispanics; Occupational Status; Racial Differences; Sexual Activity; Wages

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

An investigation of ways that employment and job characteristics influence the use of birth control by sexually active, unmarried, Hispanic, black, and white women ages 17-28. Data from the 1982-1985 waves of the NLSY support the hypothesis that women who work, especially those in high-wage, high-status, and full-time jobs, will find premarital conceptions to be costlier than women who do not work and those in lesser jobs, and as a result, will be more likely to try to avoid a premarital conception through the use of birth control. [Sociological Abstracts, Inc]
Bibliography Citation
Kraft, Joan Marie and James E. Coverdill. "Employment, Job Characteristics, and the Use of Birth Control by Sexually Active, Never-Married Black, Hispanic, and White Women." Presented: Cincinnati, OH, American Sociological Association Annual Meetings, August 1991.