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Author: Kim, Yujin
Resulting in 4 citations.
1. Kim, Yujin
Does Timing of First Incarceration Matter? The Effect of Age at First Incarceration on Midlife Health
Presented: Washington, DC, Population Association of America Annual Meetings, March 31-April 2, 2011
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Age and Ageing; Criminal Justice System; Health Factors; Incarceration/Jail; Marital Status; Transition, Adulthood

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Mass imprisonment has affected inmate and ex-inmate's family, employment, and health life, and it is worthy to look at how the timing of incarceration might affect differently on ex-inmate's life, especially their midlife health. Experiencing incarceration during transition to adulthood might mean the different life trajectory of ex-inmates comparing to those with experiencing incarceration in adulthood. I investigated how the timing of first incarceration affects people's midlife health using NLSY79. Early incarceration and later incarceration lower the log odds of respondents to say that they are in good and excellent health comparing never incarcerated people at age 40. However, when current marital status and marital history are added in the model besides demographic, family background, and health behavior, later incarceration effect does not statistically significant, but early incarceration effect is still significant. It looks like the mechanism of effect of incarceration on midlife health differs by timing of first incarceration.
Bibliography Citation
Kim, Yujin. "Does Timing of First Incarceration Matter? The Effect of Age at First Incarceration on Midlife Health." Presented: Washington, DC, Population Association of America Annual Meetings, March 31-April 2, 2011.
2. Kim, Yujin
The Effect of Incarceration on Midlife Health: A Life-Course Approach
Population Research and Policy Review 34,6 (December 2015): 827-849.
Also: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11113-015-9365-x
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Health, Mental; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Incarceration/Jail; Life Course; Propensity Scores; Transition, Adulthood

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

A significant association between incarceration and health is well established, but whether this association depends on the timing of incarceration is not known. Men who experience incarceration during the transition to adulthood are more likely to have their educational attainment and transition into the work force disrupted relative to others who are never incarcerated and to those who are first incarcerated in adulthood. Thus, I investigate whether age at first incarceration conditions the relationship between incarceration and men’s health, including general and mental health in midlife. I also examine whether the disadvantaged socioeconomic status and health behavior of ex-inmates function as a main mechanism explaining the relationship between incarceration and health. Using propensity score–weighted regressions with data from the NLSY79. I find that men with a first incarceration during the transition to adulthood (at ages 18–24) are less likely to be in good self-reported general and mental health than otherwise similar men who have never been incarcerated. Results suggest that these negative health conditions among ex-inmates are explained mostly by socioeconomic status such as educational attainment and employment. On the other hand, men with an incarceration experience later in adulthood (at ages 25–40) are not less likely to be in good general and mental health compared to otherwise similar men who have never been incarcerated. Overall, the results from this study encourage a life course approach to understanding the relationship between incarceration and health.
Bibliography Citation
Kim, Yujin. "The Effect of Incarceration on Midlife Health: A Life-Course Approach." Population Research and Policy Review 34,6 (December 2015): 827-849.
3. Raley, R. Kelly
Kim, Yujin
Early Family Formation: An Important Impediment to College Completion?
Presented: Dallas, TX, Population Association of America Meetings, April 2010
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): College Dropouts; College Education; College Enrollment; Educational Attainment; Family Formation; Fertility

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Substantial amounts of previous research have investigated the impact of a teen birth on high school completion. Although the effects of fertility on high school degree attainment are weaker than once believed, the general consensus is that teen fertility does have negative effects on educational attainment. Yet, we know little about the effects of fertility and family formation at higher levels on postsecondary attainment despite the fact that fertility rates are higher in the early twenties than they are in the teen years and rates of college-dropout are higher than rates of dropping out of high school. This extended abstract describes analysis using data from the 1997 NLSY to investigate the influence of family formation events on college persistence and degree attainment for both men and women.
Bibliography Citation
Raley, R. Kelly and Yujin Kim. "Early Family Formation: An Important Impediment to College Completion?" Presented: Dallas, TX, Population Association of America Meetings, April 2010.
4. Raley, R. Kelly
Kim, Yujin
Daniels, Kimberly
Young Adults' Fertility Expectations and Events: Associations With College Enrollment and Persistence
Journal of Marriage and Family 74,4 (August 2012): 866-879.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1741-3737.2012.00990.x/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing, Inc. => Wiley Online
Keyword(s): College Dropouts; College Education; College Enrollment; Expectations/Intentions; Fertility; Parenthood; Pregnancy and Pregnancy Outcomes

The analyses described in this article investigated the association between adolescent fertility expectations and college enrollment (N = 7,838). They also explored the potential impact of fertility expectations and events on college persistence among 4-year (n = 2,605) and 2-year (n = 1,962) college students. The analysis, which used data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 cohort, showed a significant association between expectations for early parenthood and the likelihood of going to a 4-year college or 2-year college for both men and women. In addition, the authors found that pregnancies were associated with an increased risk of college dropout for women; however, if all of the estimated effect of pregnancies on the risk of dropout were causal, they would still not be a major factor contributing to educational attainment because fertile pregnancies among college women are so rare.
Bibliography Citation
Raley, R. Kelly, Yujin Kim and Kimberly Daniels. "Young Adults' Fertility Expectations and Events: Associations With College Enrollment and Persistence." Journal of Marriage and Family 74,4 (August 2012): 866-879.