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Author: Kerckhoff, Alan C.
Resulting in 5 citations.
1. Kerckhoff, Alan C.
Everett, Diane D.
Sponsored and Contest Education Pathways to Jobs in Great Britain and the United States
Research in Sociology of Education and Socialization 6 (1986): 133-163
Cohort(s): Young Men
Publisher: JAI Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Britain, British; Cross-national Analysis; Education, Secondary; Educational Returns; Mobility; Mobility, Social; Occupational Attainment; Schooling; Vocational Education

Examined here are hypothesized differences in social mobility processes in the United States and Great Britain based on sponsored and contest norms in the regular school system and in the vocational education system. Performing multivariate analyses of data from the 1976 NLS for the United States and the 1972 Oxford Social Mobility Survey for Great Britain (n = 2,904 and 2,345, respectively) results show that the relative effects of social background and educational experiences for males aged 25-34 are the same in the two countries. However, the form of the education effects are different. In Great Britain, type of secondary school (academic versus nonacademic) and vocational education better predict level of occupation, while in the United States, the number of years of schooling is more important in predicting occupational placement. Sponsorship in regular education also appears to carry over into the vocational education system in Great Britain. While these results are consistent with Ralph H. Turner's differentiation of sponsored and contest mobility systems, neither society strictly conforms to the mobility patterns suggested by him. Rather, the social mobility processes more readily reflect James Rosenbaum's "tournament model," especially in Great Britain (Making Inequality: The Hidden Curriculum of High School Tracking, 1976). It appears that the difference between the two societies lies in the education system, not in a more general rigidity in the British stratification system.
Bibliography Citation
Kerckhoff, Alan C. and Diane D. Everett. "Sponsored and Contest Education Pathways to Jobs in Great Britain and the United States." Research in Sociology of Education and Socialization 6 (1986): 133-163.
2. Kerckhoff, Alan C.
Jackson, Robert A.
Types of Education and the Occupational Attainments of Young Men
Social Forces 61,1 (September 1982): 24-45.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2578072
Cohort(s): Young Men
Publisher: University of North Carolina Press
Keyword(s): Educational Returns; Fathers, Influence; High School Curriculum; Occupational Status; Schooling; Vocational Training

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

We examine the effects of high school curriculum and vocational training on occupational outcomes among young men 25-29 and 29-33 years of age. The effects on both occupational status and occupational routines (concern with people, data, and things) are reported. Returns to years of schooling tend to be greater for whites, but returns to curriculum and vocational training are generally greater for blacks. The major exceptions to stronger effects of vocational training for blacks involve skilled manual training and occupations dealing with things. The findings are interpreted as indicating that: (1) the usual status attainment model has inadequately specified the relationship between educational and occupational attainment; (2) the common conclusion that black occupational outcomes are less predictable than those of whites is unwarranted; and (3) curriculum and vocational training have such strong effects for blacks because they help more blacks into people-and data-processing occupations.
Bibliography Citation
Kerckhoff, Alan C. and Robert A. Jackson. "Types of Education and the Occupational Attainments of Young Men." Social Forces 61,1 (September 1982): 24-45.
3. Kerckhoff, Alan C.
Parrow, Alan A.
Early Career Contingencies in the Process of Status Attainment
Final Report, Manpower Administration, U.S. Department of Labor, 1977
Cohort(s): Young Men
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Career Patterns; Children; Educational Attainment; Employment; Marriage; Mobility, Job; Occupational Attainment; Socioeconomic Status (SES)

The Young Men sample of the NLS was used to investigate the effects of marriage and parenthood on educational and occupational attainment. The subjects were 14 through 24 years of age in l966 and were followed through l970. Multiple regression analyses were conducted for separate sub-samples which were homogeneous with respect to age, race, marital status and school enrollment status in l966.
Bibliography Citation
Kerckhoff, Alan C. and Alan A. Parrow. "Early Career Contingencies in the Process of Status Attainment." Final Report, Manpower Administration, U.S. Department of Labor, 1977.
4. Kerckhoff, Alan C.
Parrow, Alan A.
Sex Differences in Early Contingencies in Attainment
Report, U.S. Department of Labor, 1975
Cohort(s): Young Women
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Career Patterns; Children; Earnings; Educational Attainment; Marriage; Occupational Attainment; Socioeconomic Status (SES)

The effect of marriage and parenthood on educational and occupational attainment is investigated. The findings show that significant depressing effects on both educational and occupational attainments are associated with early marriage and early parenthood. For white women, age at marriage and parenthood are highly correlated and the separate effects of each are difficult to specify. In comparison, early marriage and early parenthood produce independent depressing effects for blacks. Females experience greater educational losses than males due to marriage, males show no loss due to parenthood, and females suffer occupational losses because of early marriage and early parenthood.
Bibliography Citation
Kerckhoff, Alan C. and Alan A. Parrow. "Sex Differences in Early Contingencies in Attainment." Report, U.S. Department of Labor, 1975.
5. Kerckhoff, Alan C.
Parrow, Alan A.
The Effect of Early Marriage on the Educational Attainment of Young Men
Journal of Marriage and Family 41,1 (February 1979): 97-107.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/351735
Cohort(s): Young Men
Publisher: National Council on Family Relations
Keyword(s): Educational Aspirations/Expectations; Educational Attainment; High School; I.Q.; Marriage; Teenagers

In this study, the effects of early marriage are assessed within a multivariate model of educational attainment. Seven separate subsamples of young males are analyzed with respect to race and age, who were unmarried and in school in 1966. By 1970, those in the younger age cohorts of both races who had married in the interim had significantly less education, even after the effects of a powerful set of other predictive variables are considered. Prior educational attainment as well as age at marriage are important variables; age at marriage appears to have a depressing effect for those in high school at age 17 but not for those in college at the same age.
Bibliography Citation
Kerckhoff, Alan C. and Alan A. Parrow. "The Effect of Early Marriage on the Educational Attainment of Young Men." Journal of Marriage and Family 41,1 (February 1979): 97-107.