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Author: Hotchkiss, Julie L.
Resulting in 5 citations.
1. Averett, Susan L.
Hotchkiss, Julie L.
The Probability of Receiving Benefits at Different Hours of Work
Working Paper, Easton PA: Department of Economics, Lafayette College, 1995
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Department of Economics, Lafayette College
Keyword(s): Benefits; Benefits, Fringe; Benefits, Insurance; Insurance, Health; Retirement; Work Hours

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Workers' probability of being offered medical, retirement, and life insurance benefits is estimating using a sample from the 1991 NLSY. Exogeneity of workers' wages and hours of work is rejected and thus instrumented out of the benefits equations. We find that the predicted probability of being offered each of these benefits is less than 50 percent for those traditionally defined as full-time employed (working 35 hours per week). This finding has important implications for the success of welfare reform and the impact of health care reform. We also find that for our sample of young workers, women are more likely to be offered each benefit at any given hours.
Bibliography Citation
Averett, Susan L. and Julie L. Hotchkiss. "The Probability of Receiving Benefits at Different Hours of Work." Working Paper, Easton PA: Department of Economics, Lafayette College, 1995.
2. Averett, Susan L.
Hotchkiss, Julie L.
The Probability of Receiving Benefits at Different Hours of Work
Presented: San Francisco, CA, Population Association of America Meetings, 1995
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Benefits; Benefits, Fringe; Benefits, Insurance; Gender Differences; Health Care; Health Reform; Vocational Guidance; Wages; Work Hours

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Workers' probability of being offered medical, retirement, and life insurance benefits is estimating using a sample from the 1991 NLSY. Exogeneity of workers' wages and hours of work is rejected and thus instrumented out of the benefits equations. We find that the predicted probability of being offered each of these benefits is less than 50 percent for those traditionally defined as full-time employed (working 35 hours per week). This finding has important implications for the success of welfare reform and the impact of health care reform. We also find that for our sample of young workers, women are more likely to be offered each benefit at any given hours.
Bibliography Citation
Averett, Susan L. and Julie L. Hotchkiss. "The Probability of Receiving Benefits at Different Hours of Work." Presented: San Francisco, CA, Population Association of America Meetings, 1995.
3. Darden, Michael E.
Hotchkiss, Julie L.
Pitts, M. Melinda
The Dynamics of the Smoking Wage Penalty
Journal of Health Economics published online (26 June 2021): 102485.
Also: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0167629621000709
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Geocoded Data; Human Capital; Smoking (see Cigarette Use); Unemployment Rate, Regional; Wage Gap

Cigarette smokers earn significantly less than nonsmokers, but the magnitude of the smoking wage gap and the pathways by which it originates are unclear. Proposed mechanisms often focus on spot differences in employee productivity or employer preferences, neglecting the dynamic nature of human capital development and addiction. In this paper, we formulate a dynamic model of young workers as they transition from schooling to the labor market, a period in which the lifetime trajectory of wages is being developed. We estimate the model with data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1997 Cohort, and we simulate the model under counterfactual scenarios that isolate the contemporaneous effects of smoking from dynamic differences in human capital accumulation and occupational selection. Results from our preferred model, which accounts for unobserved heterogeneity in the joint determination of smoking, human capital, labor supply, and wages, suggest that continued heavy smoking in young adulthood results in a wage penalty at age 30 of 15.9% and 15.2% for women and men, respectively. These differences are much smaller than the raw difference in means in wages at age 30. We show that the contemporaneous effect of heavy smoking net of any life-cycle effects explains 62.9% of the female smoking wage gap but only 20.4% of the male smoking wage gap.
Bibliography Citation
Darden, Michael E., Julie L. Hotchkiss and M. Melinda Pitts. "The Dynamics of the Smoking Wage Penalty." Journal of Health Economics published online (26 June 2021): 102485.
4. Darden, Michael
Hotchkiss, Julie L.
Pitts, M. Melinda
The Dynamics of the Smoking Wage Penalty
NBER Working Paper No. 27567, National Bureau of Economic Research, July 2020.
Also: https://www.nber.org/papers/w27567
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)
Keyword(s): Gender Differences; Smoking (see Cigarette Use); Wage Gap; Wage Penalty/Career Penalty

Cigarette smokers earn significantly less than nonsmokers, but the magnitude of the smoking wage gap and the pathways by which it originates are unclear. Proposed mechanisms often focus on spot differences in employee productivity or employer preferences, neglecting the dynamic nature of human capital development and addiction. In this paper, we formulate a dynamic model of young workers as they transition from schooling to the labor market, a period in which the lifetime trajectory of wages is being developed. We estimate the model with data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1997 Cohort, and we simulate the model under counterfactual scenarios that isolate the contemporaneous effects of smoking from dynamic differences in human capital accumulation and occupational selection. Results from our preferred model, which accounts for unobserved heterogeneity in the joint determination of smoking, human capital, labor supply, and wages, suggest that continued heavy smoking in young adulthood results in a wage penalty at age 30 of 14.8% and 9.3% for women and men, respectively. These differences are less than half of the raw difference in means in wages at age 30. We show that the contemporaneous effect of heavy smoking net of any life-cycle effects explains roughly 67% of the female smoking wage gap but only 11% of the male smoking wage gap.
Bibliography Citation
Darden, Michael, Julie L. Hotchkiss and M. Melinda Pitts. "The Dynamics of the Smoking Wage Penalty." NBER Working Paper No. 27567, National Bureau of Economic Research, July 2020.
5. Hotchkiss, Julie L.
Moore, Robert E.
Some Like it Hot: Assessing Longer-term Labor Market Benefits from a High-Pressure Economy
Working Paper 18-01, Andrew Young School of Policy Studies Research Paper Series, Georgia State University, February 2018.
Also: http://aysps.gsu.edu/files/2018/03/18-01-HotchkissMoore-SomelikeitHot.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY97
Publisher: Andrew Young School of Policy Studies, Georgia State University
Keyword(s): Economic Changes/Recession; Labor Market Outcomes; Unemployment; Unemployment Duration

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper explores the evidence for positive hysteresis in the labor market. Using data from the National Longitudinal Surveys of Youth, we find that negative labor market outcomes during high unemployment periods are mitigated by exposure to a high-pressure economy during the preceding expansion. Breaking total exposure into average intensity and duration, suggests that these two dimensions have differing impacts depending on the outcome. Additionally, benefits are typically only statistically different from no exposure for a relatively few demographic groups.
Bibliography Citation
Hotchkiss, Julie L. and Robert E. Moore. "Some Like it Hot: Assessing Longer-term Labor Market Benefits from a High-Pressure Economy." Working Paper 18-01, Andrew Young School of Policy Studies Research Paper Series, Georgia State University, February 2018.