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Author: Hershbein, Brad
Resulting in 5 citations.
1. Bailey, Martha J.
Hershbein, Brad
Miller, Amalia Rebecca
The Opt-In Revolution? Contraception and the Gender Gap in Wages
Working Paper No. 17922. National Bureau of Economic Research, March 2012.
Also: http://www.nber.org/papers/w17922
Cohort(s): Young Women
Publisher: National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)
Keyword(s): Career Patterns; Contraception; Gender; Gender Differences; Human Capital; Wage Rates; Wages; Women

Decades of research on the U.S. gender gap in wages describes its correlates, but little is known about why women changed their career paths in the 1960s and 1970s. This paper explores the role of “the Pill” in altering women’s human capital investments and its ultimate implications for life-cycle wages. Using state-by-birth-cohort variation in legal access to contraception, we show that younger access to the Pill conferred an 8-percent hourly wage premium by age fifty. Our estimates imply that the Pill can account for 10 percent of the convergence of the gender gap in the 1980s and 30 percent in the 1990s.
Bibliography Citation
Bailey, Martha J., Brad Hershbein and Amalia Rebecca Miller. "The Opt-In Revolution? Contraception and the Gender Gap in Wages." Working Paper No. 17922. National Bureau of Economic Research, March 2012.
2. Bailey, Martha J.
Hershbein, Brad
Miller, Amalia Rebecca
The Opt-In Revolution? Contraception and the Gender Gap in Wages
American Economic Journal: Applied Economics 4,3 (July 2012): 225-254.
Also: https://www.aeaweb.org/articles.php?doi=10.1257/app.4.3.225&fnd=s
Cohort(s): Young Women
Publisher: American Economic Association
Keyword(s): Contraception; Gender Differences; Human Capital; Life Cycle Research; Wage Gap; Wage Penalty/Career Penalty

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Decades of research on the US gender gap in wages describes its correlates, but little is known about why women changed their career paths in the 1960s and 1970s. This paper explores the role of "the Pill" in altering women's human capital investments and its ultimate implications for life-cycle wages. Using state-by-birthcohort variation in legal access, we show that younger access to the Pill conferred an 8 percent hourly wage premium by age 50. Our estimates imply that the Pill can account for 10 percent of the convergence of the gender gap in the 1980s and 30 percent in the 1990s. (JEL J13, J16, J31, J71, J24)
Bibliography Citation
Bailey, Martha J., Brad Hershbein and Amalia Rebecca Miller. "The Opt-In Revolution? Contraception and the Gender Gap in Wages." American Economic Journal: Applied Economics 4,3 (July 2012): 225-254.
3. Bartik, Timothy
Hershbein, Brad
The Relationship Between Family Income Background and the Returns to Education
Presented: Chicago IL, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April 2017
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY97
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): College Degree; Educational Returns; Family Background; Family Income; Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID); Poverty; Socioeconomic Background

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Drawing upon the Panel Study of Income Dynamics and National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, we document a startling empirical pattern: the career earnings premium from a four-year college degree (relative to a high school diploma) for persons from low-income backgrounds is nearly half (in proportional terms) what it is for those from more-fortunate backgrounds. We establish the prevalence and robustness of these differential returns to education across race, gender, and the earnings distribution, finding that they are driven by whites and men and by differential access to the right tail of the earnings distribution. Exploiting the richness of the family background variables in our data and external sources, we employ several decomposition strategies to explore the role of neighborhood characteristics, school quality, college selectivity, field of study, location, and preferences in explaining the phenomenon. We conclude with implications for how greater education may affect income and inequality.
Bibliography Citation
Bartik, Timothy and Brad Hershbein. "The Relationship Between Family Income Background and the Returns to Education." Presented: Chicago IL, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April 2017.
4. Hershbein, Brad
Graduating High School in a Recession: Work, Education, and Home Production
B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis and Policy 12,1 (January 2012): Article 3.
Also: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3409569/
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co. KG
Keyword(s): Economic Changes/Recession; Educational Attainment; Gender Differences; High School Completion/Graduates; Labor Force Participation; Wage Penalty/Career Penalty

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper explores how high school graduate men and women vary in their behavioral responses to beginning labor market entry during a recession. In contrast with previous related literature that found a substantial negative wage impact but minimal employment impact in samples of highly educated men, the empirical evidence presented here suggests a different outcome for the less well educated, and between the sexes. Women, but not men, who graduate high school in an adverse labor market are less likely to be in the workforce for the next four years, but longer-term effects are minimal. Further, while men increase their enrollment as a short-run response to weak labor demand, women do not; instead, they appear to temporarily substitute into home production. Women’s wages are less affected then men’s, and both groups’ wages are less affected than the college graduates previously studied.
Bibliography Citation
Hershbein, Brad. "Graduating High School in a Recession: Work, Education, and Home Production." B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis and Policy 12,1 (January 2012): Article 3.
5. Hershbein, Brad
Worker Signals among New College Graduates: The Role of Selectivity and GPA
Upjohn Institute Working Paper No. 13-190, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research, January 2013.
Also: http://research.upjohn.org/up_workingpapers/190/
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research
Keyword(s): Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB); College Characteristics; College Graduates; Earnings; Grade Point Average (GPA)/Grades; High School and Beyond (HSB); National Education Longitudinal Survey (NELS); National Longitudinal Study of the High School Class of 1972 (NLS72); Project Talent

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Recent studies have found a large earnings premium to attending a more selective college, but the mechanisms underlying this premium have received little attention and remain unclear. In order to shed light on this question, I develop a multidimensional signaling model relying on college grades and selectivity that rationalizes students' choices of effort and firms' wage-setting behavior. The model is then used to produce predictions of how the interaction of the signals should be related to wages, namely that the return on college GPA should fall the more selective the institution attended. Using five data sets that span the early 1960s through the late 2000s, I show that the data support the predictions of the signaling model, with support growing stronger over time as college sorting by ability has increased. The findings imply that return to college selectivity depends on GPA, something previously not recognized in the literature, and they can rationalize why employers learn more quickly about college graduates' productivity than less educated workers'.
Bibliography Citation
Hershbein, Brad. "Worker Signals among New College Graduates: The Role of Selectivity and GPA." Upjohn Institute Working Paper No. 13-190, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research, January 2013.