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Author: Harvey, Hope
Resulting in 4 citations.
1. Harvey, Hope
Cumulative Effect of Family Structure on Educational Attainment
Presented: San Diego CA, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April-May 2015
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): College Enrollment; Educational Attainment; Family History; Family Structure; High School Completion/Graduates

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Scholars have long recognized the importance of family structure, but studies often "control away" effects that operate through time-varying characteristics like income. Using the NLSY79, I employ inverse probability treatment weighting and marginal structure models to examine the effects of family structure on educational attainment. These methods allow for dynamic selection, in which family structure affects time-varying characteristics that are in turn associated with future family structure. I find that compared to an additional year with married biological parents, a year with a single mother is associated with a 6.1% reduction in the odds of graduating high school and 3.1% reduction in the odds of attending college, and a year with a cohabiting social father is associated with a 13.5% reduction in the odds of graduating high school and 12.4% reduction in the odds of attending college. Totaled across childhood, family structure can substantially shape children's life chances.
Bibliography Citation
Harvey, Hope. "Cumulative Effect of Family Structure on Educational Attainment." Presented: San Diego CA, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April-May 2015.
2. Harvey, Hope
Cumulative Effects of Doubling up in Childhood on Young Adult Outcomes
Presented: Montreal, QC, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2017
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Childhood Residence; Educational Attainment; Grandparents; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Household Composition; Household Structure; Modeling, Marginal Structural; Siblings

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Living in a doubled up household is a common childhood experience, yet we know little about the cumulative effects of these households on children. In this paper, I present estimates of the impacts of three types of doubled up households: 1) those formed with the child's grandparent(s), 2) those formed with the child's adult sibling(s), and 3) those formed with another adult(s). I first explore what family characteristics predict residence in each type of doubled up households. I then employ marginal structural models and inverse probability of treatment weighting, methods that allow me to account for the fact that household composition is both a cause and consequence of other family characteristics, to estimate the relationship between childhood years spent in each double up type and young adult educational attainment and health. This analysis provides evidence that this increasingly common household form may play a role in shaping children's life chances.
Bibliography Citation
Harvey, Hope. "Cumulative Effects of Doubling up in Childhood on Young Adult Outcomes." Presented: Montreal, QC, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2017.
3. Killewald, Alexandra
Harvey, Hope
The Effect of Maternal Employment Experiences on Adolescent Outcomes
Presented: Washington DC, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, March-April 2016
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Children, Well-Being; College Enrollment; Educational Attainment; High School Completion/Graduates; Maternal Employment; Obesity; Smoking (see Cigarette Use)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Prior research on the consequences of maternal employment for children's well-being has predominantly evaluated effects of early maternal employment on young children's outcomes. We conceptualize children as exposed to a 17-year trajectory of maternal employment and hypothesize that cumulative maternal employment will positively affect offspring's health and educational attainment in young adulthood, measured by obesity, smoking, high school graduation, and college enrollment. To test this hypothesis, we link data on women's employment histories from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 (NLSY79) with the young adult outcomes of their children, collected in the NLSY79 Children and Young Adults study. Using marginal structural models and inverse probability of treatment weights, we account for the fact that maternal employment both affects and is affected by other family characteristics and provide the most accurate estimates to date of the cumulative, long-term effects of maternal employment on offspring life chances.
Bibliography Citation
Killewald, Alexandra and Hope Harvey. "The Effect of Maternal Employment Experiences on Adolescent Outcomes." Presented: Washington DC, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, March-April 2016.
4. Tach, Laura
Edin, Kathryn
Harvey, Hope
Bryan, Brielle
The Family-Go-Round: Family Complexity and Father Involvement from a Father's Perspective
Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science 654,1 (July 2014): 169-184.
Also: http://ann.sagepub.com/content/654/1/169.full
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Family Structure; Fathers, Involvement; Fertility, Multiple Partners; Parent-Child Relationship/Closeness; Parents, Non-Custodial

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Men who have children with several partners are often assumed to be 'deadbeats' who eschew their responsibilities to their children. Using data from the nationally representative National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 cohort (NLSY-97), we show that most men in complex families intensively parent the children of one mother while being less involved, or not involved at all, with children by others. Repeated qualitative interviews with 110 low-income noncustodial fathers reveal that men in complex families often engage with and provide, at least to some degree, for all of the biological and stepchildren who live in one mother's household. These activities often exceed those extended to biological children living elsewhere. Interviews also show that by devoting most or all of their resources to the children of just one mother, men in complex families feel successful as fathers even if they are not intensively involved with their other biological children.
Bibliography Citation
Tach, Laura, Kathryn Edin, Hope Harvey and Brielle Bryan. "The Family-Go-Round: Family Complexity and Father Involvement from a Father's Perspective." Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science 654,1 (July 2014): 169-184.