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Author: Grossman, Daniel S.
Resulting in 2 citations.
1. Sloan, Frank A.
Grossman, Daniel S.
Alcohol Consumption in Early Adulthood and Schooling Completed and Labor Market Outcomes at Midlife by Race and Gender
American Journal of Public Health 101,11 (November 2011): 2093-2101.
Also: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21330591
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: American Public Health Association
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Educational Attainment; Labor Market Outcomes; Occupational Attainment; Racial Differences

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Objectives. We assessed the relation of alcohol consumption in young adulthood to problem alcohol consumption 10 years later and to educational attainment and labor market outcomes at midlife. We considered whether these relations differ between Blacks and Whites.

Methods. We classified individuals on the basis of their drinking frequency patterns with data from the 1982 to 1984 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 (respondents aged 19–27 years). We assessed alcohol consumption from the 1991 reinterview (respondents aged 26–34 years) and midlife outcomes from the 2006 reinterview (respondents aged 41–49 years).

Results. Black men who consumed 12 or more drinks per week at baseline had lower earnings at midlife, but no corresponding relation for Black women or Whites was found. Black men and Black women who consumed 12 or more drinks per week at baseline had lower occupational attainment than did White male non-drinkers and White female non-drinkers, respectively, but this result was not statistically significant.

Conclusions. The relation between alcohol consumption in young adulthood and important outcomes at midlife differed between Blacks and Whites and between Black men and Black women, although Blacks’ alcohol consumption at baseline was lower on average than was that of Whites.

Bibliography Citation
Sloan, Frank A. and Daniel S. Grossman. "Alcohol Consumption in Early Adulthood and Schooling Completed and Labor Market Outcomes at Midlife by Race and Gender ." American Journal of Public Health 101,11 (November 2011): 2093-2101.
2. Sloan, Frank A.
Grossman, Daniel S.
Platt, Alyssa
Heavy Episodic Drinking in Early Adulthood and Outcomes in Midlife
Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs 72,3 (May 2011): 459-470.
Also: http://www.jsad.com/jsad/article/Heavy_Episodic_Drinking_in_Early_Adulthood_and_Outcomes_in_Midlife/4578.html
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Center of Alcohol Studies, Rutgers University
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Educational Attainment; Health Factors; Labor Market Outcomes; Propensity Scores; Youth Problems

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Objective: This study assessed to what extent drinking patterns of young adults persist into midlife and whether frequent heavy episodic drinking as a young adult is associated with educational attainment, labor market, and health outcomes at midlife.

Method: Using the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979, we grouped individuals into three baseline drinking categories using data on the number of occasions they consumed six or more drinks on one occasion from the 1982-1984 surveys. Categories were frequent heavy episodic drinker, occasional heavy episodic drinker, and other drinker/abstainer. We used propensity score matching to compare baseline drinking groups on midlife alcohol consumption, educational attainment, and labor market and health outcomes.

Results: Frequent heavy episodic drinkers substantially reduced alcohol consumption between baseline and follow-up 25 years later. However, they were much more likely to abuse alcohol and be alcohol dependent in 1994 and be heavy episodic drinkers at the 25-year follow-up compared with the other drinking groups. After matching, there was little indication that being in a higher consumption baseline alcohol group was adversely associated with years of schooling completed by middle age, the probability of being employed, earnings conditional on being employed in midlife, and health problems in midlife. Results on the probability of surviving to follow-up were mixed.

Conclusions: Frequent heavy episodic drinking at ages 17-25 years was associated with higher rates of alcohol dependence and abuse at a 10-year follow-up and alcohol consumption 25 years following baseline but not with other study outcomes at midlife. Lack of differences in outcomes at midlife may be because of decreased heavy episodic drinking among the heaviest baseline drinkers. (J. Stud. Alcohol Drugs, 72, 459–470, 2011)

Bibliography Citation
Sloan, Frank A., Daniel S. Grossman and Alyssa Platt. "Heavy Episodic Drinking in Early Adulthood and Outcomes in Midlife." Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs 72,3 (May 2011): 459-470.