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Author: Ge, Suqin
Resulting in 8 citations.
1. Eckstein, Zvi
Ge, Suqin
Petrongolo, Barbara
Job and Wage Mobility in a Search Model with Non-Compliance (Exemptions) with the Minimum Wage
IZA Discussion Paper No. 2076, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA), April 2006.
Also: http://ftp.iza.org/dp2076.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA)
Keyword(s): Job Search; Mobility, Job; Modeling; Wage Growth; Wages

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

How well does a simple search on-the-job model fit the eighteen years of job and wage mobility of high school graduates? To answer this question we are confronted from the data with a prevalent non-compliance and exemptions from the minimum wage. We incorporate this observation in a job search model with three main ingredients: (i) search on-the-job; (ii) minimum wages, with potentially imperfect compliance or exemptions; and, (iii) exogenous wage growth on-the-job. We use panel data drawn from the NLSY79, US youth panel starting in 1979, to estimate the parameters of our simple job search model and, in particular, the extent of non-compliance/exemptions to the minimum wage. The model is solved numerically and we use simulated moments to estimate the parameters. The estimated parameters are consistent with the model and they provide a good fit for the observed levels and trends of the main job and wage mobility data. Furthermore, the estimated model indicates that the non-compliance and exemption rate with the federal minimum wage translates into a roughly 10% of jobs paying less than the minimum wage. Counterfactual experiment of increase of the compliance/non-exemption rate or the minimum wage shows a small effect on mean accepted wages but a significant negative effect on the non-employment rate.
Bibliography Citation
Eckstein, Zvi, Suqin Ge and Barbara Petrongolo. "Job and Wage Mobility in a Search Model with Non-Compliance (Exemptions) with the Minimum Wage." IZA Discussion Paper No. 2076, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA), April 2006.
2. Eckstein, Zvi
Ge, Suqin
Petrongolo, Barbara
Job and Wage Mobility with Minimum Wages and Imperfect Compliance
Journal of Applied Econometrics 26,4 (June-July 2011): 580.
Also: http://www.econ.queensu.ca/jae/forthcoming/eckstein-ge-petrongolo/
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Job Search; Labor Force Participation; Life Cycle Research; Mobility, Job; Modeling; Wage Dynamics; Wage Growth

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

We propose a job search model with minimum wage regulations and imperfect compliance to explain the doubling of the mean and variance of hourly earnings of white males during the first eighteen years of labor market experience. The model encompasses job mobility and on-the-job wage growth as sources of wage dynamics, and is estimated by simulated GMM using data from the NLSY79. Our estimates provide a good fit for the observed levels and trends of the main job and wage mobility data, and for the increase in the mean and variance of wages over the life cycle, as well as for the fall in the fraction of workers paid below the minimum wage. Job mobility explains 40% to 50% of the observed wage growth. Increases in the minimum wage and/or compliance deliver small effects on the wage distribution and the nonemployment rate.

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Bibliography Citation
Eckstein, Zvi, Suqin Ge and Barbara Petrongolo. "Job and Wage Mobility with Minimum Wages and Imperfect Compliance." Journal of Applied Econometrics 26,4 (June-July 2011): 580.
3. Eckstein, Zvi
Ge, Suqin
Petrongolo, Barbara
Minimum Wage and Compliance in a Model of Search on-the-Job
Presented: Sonderborg, Denmark, Conference of Labor Market Models and Matched Employer-Employee Data, August 2004.
Also: http://repec.org/sed2005/up.25119.1104042882.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Center for Labour Market and Social Research
Keyword(s): Job Search; Minimum Wage; Modeling

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

We estimate a job search model with three main ingredients: (i) search on-the-job; (ii) wage growth on-the-job; and (iii) minimum wages, with potentially imperfect compliance. We use data drawn from the NLSY79 to estimate the parameters of our job search model and, in particular, the extent of compliance to the minimum wage. The model is solved numerically and we use simulated moments to estimate the parameters. The estimated parameters are consistent with the model and they provide a good fit for the observed level and trend of main labor market moments. Furthermore, the arrival rate of job offers below the minimum wage is 40% lower than the arrival rate of job offers above the minimum wage.
Bibliography Citation
Eckstein, Zvi, Suqin Ge and Barbara Petrongolo. "Minimum Wage and Compliance in a Model of Search on-the-Job." Presented: Sonderborg, Denmark, Conference of Labor Market Models and Matched Employer-Employee Data, August 2004.
4. Ge, Suqin
College, Employment, and Marriage Decisions of Young Women
Ph.D. Dissertation, University of Minnesota, 2006. DAI-A 67/08, Feb 2007
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: ProQuest Dissertations & Theses (PQDT)
Keyword(s): College Enrollment; Labor Economics; Marriage; Women; Women's Studies

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This thesis investigates the sequential college attendance, labor supply, and marital status decisions of high school females. Two main questions are asked: (1) how large is the impact of marriage on women's college choice? (2) how can the returns to schooling defined by schooling coefficient in earnings equation be consistently estimated? A dynamic choice model of school attendance, labor supply, and marriage is formulated and structurally estimated using panel data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 (NLSY79). Marriage is found to have as large an effect on college choice as earnings. The college graduation rate would drop from 38% to 32% if the benefits from marriage were not taken into account. Simulated data from the estimated structural model are used to study the discrepancy between OLS and IV estimates of the returns to schooling. Despite being highly restrictive, the structural approach seems to have advantages in estimating the returns to schooling. As an out of sample validation of the model, the estimated model is used to predict the college enrollment behavior of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 (NLSY97) sample. The model can account for 75% of the dramatic increase in college enrollment between the early 1980's and the early 2000's.
Bibliography Citation
Ge, Suqin. College, Employment, and Marriage Decisions of Young Women. Ph.D. Dissertation, University of Minnesota, 2006. DAI-A 67/08, Feb 2007.
5. Ge, Suqin
Estimating the Returns to Schooling: Implications from a Dynamic Discrete Choice Model
Labour Economics 20 (January 2013): 92-105.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0927537112001121
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Educational Returns; Modeling, Instrumental Variables; Modeling, OLS; Schooling

This paper assesses the applicability of a dynamic discrete choice model in accounting for the observed ordinary least squares (OLS) and instrumental variable (IV) estimates of the Mincer equation parameter on returns to schooling. A dynamic model of schooling and employment choices is estimated and used to simulate educational attainment, employment history, and wages. Estimations of the Mincer wage equation using simulated data appear to validate the model. Ability selection is found to be the major source of bias in the OLS estimates of schooling returns. Although the IV estimates lie within the support of true returns to schooling if a strong and strictly exogenous instrument is used and if dynamic employment selection is controlled, these conditions may be easily violated in practice.
Bibliography Citation
Ge, Suqin. "Estimating the Returns to Schooling: Implications from a Dynamic Discrete Choice Model ." Labour Economics 20 (January 2013): 92-105.
6. Ge, Suqin
Women's College Decisions: How Much Does Marriage Matter?
Working Paper, Department of Economics, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, March 2008.
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY97
Publisher: Department of Economics, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University
Keyword(s): College Enrollment; Labor Supply; Marriage

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper investigates the sequential college attendance decisions of young women and quantifies the impact of marriage expectations on their decisions to attend and graduate from college. A dynamic choice model of college attendance, labor supply, and marriage is formulated and structurally estimated using panel data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 (NLSY79). The model is used to simulate the effects of no marriage benefits and finds that the predicted college attendance rate would drop from 61% to 56%. Using the estimated model, the college attendance behavior for a younger cohort (data taken from the NLSY97) is predicted and used to validate the behavioral model.
Bibliography Citation
Ge, Suqin. "Women's College Decisions: How Much Does Marriage Matter?" Working Paper, Department of Economics, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, March 2008.
7. Ge, Suqin
Women’s College Decisions: How Much Does Marriage Matter?
Journal of Labor Economics 29,4 (October 2011): 773-818.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1086/659777
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY97
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
Keyword(s): College Enrollment; Labor Supply; Marriage; Modeling

This article investigates the sequential college attendance decision of young women and quantifies the effect of marriage expectations on their decision to attend and graduate from college. A dynamic choice model of college attendance, labor supply, and marriage is formulated and structurally estimated using panel data from the NLSY79. The model is used to simulate the effects of no marriage benefits and finds that the predicted college enrollment rate will drop from 58.0% to 50.5%. Using the estimated model, the college attendance behavior for a younger cohort from the NLSY97 is predicted and used to validate the behavioral model.
Bibliography Citation
Ge, Suqin. "Women’s College Decisions: How Much Does Marriage Matter?" Journal of Labor Economics 29,4 (October 2011): 773-818.
8. Ge, Suqin
Yang, Fang
Accounting for the Gender Gap in College Attainment
Working Paper, Department of Economics, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, February 2009
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Department of Economics, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University
Keyword(s): College Education; Earnings; Educational Attainment; Gender; Gender Differences; Parental Influences

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

One striking phenomenon in the U.S. labor market is the reversal of the gender gap in college attainment. Females have outnumbered males in college attainment since 1987. We develop a discrete choice model of college entry decisions to study the effects of changes in relative earnings, changes in parental education, and changes in the marriage market on time series observations of college attainment by gender. We find that the increase in the relative earnings between college and high school individuals and the increasing parental education have important effects on the increase in college attainment for both genders but cannot explain the reversal of the gender gap. Declining marriage rates decrease returns to college for females less than those for males, and thus is crucial in explaining the reversal of the gender gap in college attainment.
Bibliography Citation
Ge, Suqin and Fang Yang. "Accounting for the Gender Gap in College Attainment." Working Paper, Department of Economics, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, February 2009.