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Author: Gardecki, Rosella M.
Resulting in 5 citations.
1. Aughinbaugh, Alison Aileen
Gardecki, Rosella M.
Attrition in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997
Presented: Washington, DC, Bureau of Labor Statistics Conference Center, NLSY97 Tenth Anniversary Conference, May 29-30, 2008.
Also: http://www.fcsm.gov/07papers/Aughinbaugh.V-C.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Attrition; Cigarette Use (see Smoking); Gender Differences; Nonresponse; Research Methodology; Sample Selection; Socioeconomic Status (SES)

This paper measures the level, the patterns, and the implications of attrition in the NLSY97. Much of the survey methodology literature considers participation in surveys as a multi-step process, where step 1 is establishing contact and step 2 involves gaining cooperation (Watson and Woods 2006). Because few NLSY97 sample members are unlocatable, however, we study attrition as a simple one-step process.

The first section of this paper describes the patterns of wave non-response, first attrition, and return in the NLSY97. The second section estimates (1) the probability of first attrition, and (2) among attritors, the probability of return in a subsequent round as functions of employment, schooling, and demographic events at the most recent interview thus we can assess whether certain groups of individuals (e.g. the unemployed, students, the married) are more likely to leave and return to the NLSY97. In the third section, we estimate quantile regressions in an attempt to examine whether attritors and returnees differ from those who remain in the survey with respect to the distribution of wage rates and total earnings. Lastly, we conclude by summarizing what the estimates presented here tell us about the nature and implications of attrition in the NLSY97.

Bibliography Citation
Aughinbaugh, Alison Aileen and Rosella M. Gardecki. "Attrition in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997." Presented: Washington, DC, Bureau of Labor Statistics Conference Center, NLSY97 Tenth Anniversary Conference, May 29-30, 2008.
2. Gardecki, Rosella M.
Racial Differences in Youth Employment
Monthly Labor Review 124,8 (August 2001): 51-67.
Also: http://stats.bls.gov/opub/mlr/2001/08/art6abs.htm
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Child Care; Economics of Minorities; Employment, Youth; Family Studies; Fertility; Racial Differences

This article examines the factors that affect different types of jobholding among teens in order to understand employment decisions the youngest workers must confront, and how these decisions may differ by racial group. Data are from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997. The article focuses on the individual, family, neighborhood, and spatial characteristics that affect jobholding among teens living in a parental household. The author finds that the employment of older teens may be considered a positive outcome, with further findings suggesting that future programs should address issues such as teen job opportunities and job search networks.
Bibliography Citation
Gardecki, Rosella M. "Racial Differences in Youth Employment." Monthly Labor Review 124,8 (August 2001): 51-67.
3. Gardecki, Rosella M.
Neumark, David B.
Early Labor Market Experiences and Their Consequences for Adult Labor Market Outcomes
Final Report to the Office of Technology Assessment (OTA) A3-0076.0, September 1995
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: U.S. Government Printing Office
Keyword(s): Job Training; Labor Market Demographics; Labor Market Outcomes; Transition, School to Work; Wages, Youth

In this paper we seek to provide empirical evidence on the labor market experiences of youths, and their transitions to career jobs, in order to better inform this policy debate. We proceed in three steps. First. we describe numerous dimensions of youth labor market experiences, including training, wages, the stability of employment measured along a number of dimensions, the accumulation of tenure, and industry and occupation of employment. We ask questions such as "How much training does a worker receive in his or her first few years in the labor market, and how does this change over these first few years?," "How much community college does a person attend after leaving more traditional formal schooling?," and "How much tenure with an employer does a young worker tend to accumulate, and how does the distribution of tenure evolve in the first few years in the labor market?- Second, we document the intertemporal relationships among these various components of youth labor market experiences, to understand the consequences, if any, of a failure to settle into a steady job or steady employment, or a job involving training, in the first year or two after leaving school. An implicit criticism of the "chaotic" youth labor market would appear to be that the failure to find stable employment and jobs immediately after leaving school worsens the ability of young workers to find stable employment and jobs down the road. Finally, we explore the relationship between the entire gamut of youth labor market experiences and labor market outcomes of more mature adults. This is the question with which we should ultimately be concerned. There are many paths to "success" as an adult in the labor market, and we would like to know whether more "chaotic" experiences in the school-to-work transition are in fact associated with less success in the labor market in the long run. While there is a voluminous literature on youth labor markets and young workers, relatively little research has addressed the links between youth labor market experiences and the careers of adults, and, to the best of our knowledge, no research has attempted to take a comprehensive look at the relationships between numerous dimensions of the youth labor market experience and later careers. Thus, while our findings by no means address or settle all of the questions relevant to the transitions of youths to their adult labor market careers, they add a good deal of helpful information.
Bibliography Citation
Gardecki, Rosella M. and David B. Neumark. "Early Labor Market Experiences and Their Consequences for Adult Labor Market Outcomes." Final Report to the Office of Technology Assessment (OTA) A3-0076.0, September 1995.
4. Gardecki, Rosella M.
Neumark, David B.
Order from Chaos? The Effects of Early Labor Market Experiences on Adult Labor Market Outcomes
Industrial and Labor Relations Review 51,2 (January 1998): 299-322.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2525220
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: New York State School of Industrial and Labor Relations, Cornell University
Keyword(s): Labor Market Outcomes; Mobility; Mobility, Labor Market; Transition, School to Work

This paper examines the consequences of initial periods of "churning" or "mobility" in the labor market, to help assess whether faster transitions to stable employment relationships--as envisioned by advocates of school-to-work programs--would be likely to lead to better adult labor market outcomes. An analysis of National Longitudinal Survey of Youth data for the years 1979-92 yields modest evidence, at best, linking early job market stability to better labor market outcomes. The authors find that for both genders, adult labor market outcomes (defined as of the late 20s or early to mid-30s) are for the most part unrelated to early labor market experiences. This evidence does not support efforts to explicitly target the school-to-work transition, insofar as doing so implies changing the structure of youth labor markets so that workers form earlier and firmer attachments to employers, industries, or occupations. Copyright by Cornell University.
Bibliography Citation
Gardecki, Rosella M. and David B. Neumark. "Order from Chaos? The Effects of Early Labor Market Experiences on Adult Labor Market Outcomes." Industrial and Labor Relations Review 51,2 (January 1998): 299-322.
5. Zagorsky, Jay L.
Gardecki, Rosella M.
What Have Researchers Learned from the National Longitudinal Surveys?
Journal of Economic and Social Measurement 25 (1998): 35-57.
Also: http://iospress.metapress.com/content/5et2x255j415ql9y/?p=a98cfad3710a428fa79ea6103004f3df&pi=2
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, Mature Women, NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult, NLSY97, Older Men, Young Men, Young Women
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Attrition; Computer Assisted Personal Interviewing (CAPI); Crime; Data Quality/Consistency; Educational Attainment; Intelligence; Job Search; Methods/Methodology; Migration; Overview, Child Assessment Data; Parents, Single; Retirement; Schooling; Wages; Work Experience

This article examines the National Longitudinal Surveys of Labor Market Experience, commonly called the NLS. The article first provides a brief overview of the information available in these long-running surveys. Second, it discusses the contributions of NLS-based research to various topics within the field of economics. Finally, it summarizes topics within the NLS questionnaires that have expanded recently to accommodate the changing circumstances of the cohorts.
Bibliography Citation
Zagorsky, Jay L. and Rosella M. Gardecki. "What Have Researchers Learned from the National Longitudinal Surveys?" Journal of Economic and Social Measurement 25 (1998): 35-57.