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Author: Dirlam, Jonathan
Resulting in 4 citations.
1. Dirlam, Jonathan
Kosla, Martin
Gender Composition and Job Satisfaction: Are People Happier in Gender Segregated Jobs?
Presented: Chicago IL, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2015
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Gender Differences; Job Satisfaction; Modeling, Random Effects; Occupational Segregation

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Despite much attention being given to explaining the "paradox of the contented female worker," one aspect of the relationship between gender and job satisfaction has received relatively little consideration in the sociological literature: the gender composition of occupations. Gender composition is theoretically important in several ways. First, exploring the relationship between gender composition and job satisfaction may provide insights into the reference groups used by workers (sex-specific vs. coworker-specific). Second, by analyzing this relationship we can observe how token and majority statuses influence job satisfaction differently for men and women (Kanter 1977). Finally, gender composition can be used to test how social conflict (Blalock 1967) affects the job satisfaction of both men and women. Using longitudinal data from the NLSY79, we explore what the effects of occupational gender composition are for job satisfaction. We use ordered logit random effects models and find that gender composition appears to exhibit a non-linear relationship with job satisfaction. When looking at the entire sample, respondents in gender homogeneous occupations tend to be more satisfied than respondents in diverse occupations. This general pattern holds regardless of whether the respondent is a member of the gender-majority or gender-minority - though being a member of the gender-majority has a stronger positive impact on job satisfaction. This finding best supports Blalock's theory of intergroup conflict. In gender-specific models, the pattern of respondents being more satisfied in gender-homogenous occupations holds for females, but not males.
Bibliography Citation
Dirlam, Jonathan and Martin Kosla. "Gender Composition and Job Satisfaction: Are People Happier in Gender Segregated Jobs?" Presented: Chicago IL, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2015.
2. Dirlam, Jonathan
Merry, Joseph
Is the Beneficial Effect of College on Self-esteem and Mastery Overstated?
Presented: Philadelphia PA, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2018
Cohort(s): NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): College Education; Debt/Borrowing; Pearlin Mastery Scale; Personality/Big Five Factor Model or Traits; Self-Esteem

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Prior studies have found college attendance and degree attainment to increase self-esteem and mastery in young adults. Yet college attendance itself is likely influenced by self-esteem and mastery levels experienced in adolescence. This implies that college education may act as a mediator for adolescent personality characteristics. Using data from the NLSY79-YA, we investigate the potential mediating effect of college education by estimating group based self-esteem and mastery trajectories for respondents between the ages of 14 and 18. We then test the mediating hypothesis for college education by first analyzing whether these adolescent trajectories are influential for college attendance and graduation. Second, we analyze whether the inclusion of these adolescent trajectories significantly reduces the effects of college attendance and degree attainment on self-esteem and mastery levels experienced between the ages of 24 and 32. We also investigate potential mediating relationships of adolescent personality characteristics for education and credit card debt. Our findings suggest that both college education and debt accumulation act as mediators for adolescent self-esteem and mastery trajectories. These findings imply that the benefit of going to college or acquiring debt may be overstated when adolescent personality characteristics are not taken into consideration.
Bibliography Citation
Dirlam, Jonathan and Joseph Merry. "Is the Beneficial Effect of College on Self-esteem and Mastery Overstated?" Presented: Philadelphia PA, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2018.
3. Dirlam, Jonathan
Zheng, Hui
Job Satisfaction Developmental Trajectories and Health: A Life Course Perspective
Presented: Seattle WA, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2016
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Health, Mental; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Job Satisfaction; Life Course

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

We use data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 cohort (NLSY79) to examine how heterogeneity in job satisfaction developmental trajectories of individuals starting at age 25 and ending at age 39 influence health outcomes after the age of 40. The application of job satisfaction developmental trajectories affords us several advantages over past research. First, the incorporation of life course models allows us to observe if prolonged job satisfaction has a greater beneficial effect on health outcomes compared to intermittingly experienced levels of job satisfaction. If the effect of prolonged job satisfaction is greater, we can analyze whether this effect is strong enough to influence physical health more than the non-existent to modest relationship found in past studies (Faragher, Cass, and Cooper, 2005; Heslop, et al, 2002). The effects of job satisfaction developmental trajectories are assessed on several mental and physical health outcomes. Second, the estimation of the job satisfaction trajectories themselves affords us the ability to see what factors can influence membership and which groups are more likely to belong to a particular trajectory. Finally, trajectory analysis also allows us to include both the working and non-working population in our health models in contrast to prior studies that mainly include only the working population (Nakata, Irie, and Takahashi, 2013; Amati et al, 2010; Fischer and Sousa-Poza, 2009; Heslop, et al, 2002).
Bibliography Citation
Dirlam, Jonathan and Hui Zheng. "Job Satisfaction Developmental Trajectories and Health: A Life Course Perspective." Presented: Seattle WA, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2016.
4. Dirlam, Jonathan
Zheng, Hui
Job Satisfaction Developmental Trajectories and Health: A Life Course Perspective
Social Science and Medicine 178 (April 2017): 95-103.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0277953617300473
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): CESD (Depression Scale); Health, Mental; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Job Satisfaction; Life Course; Sleep

Understanding the health consequence of job dissatisfaction becomes increasingly important because job insecurity, stress and dissatisfaction have significantly increased in the United States in the last decade. Despite the extensive work in this area, prior studies nonetheless may underestimate the harmful effect of job dissatisfaction due to the cross-sectional nature of their data and sample selection bias. This study applies a life-course approach to more comprehensively examine the relationship between job satisfaction and health. Using data from the NLSY 1979 cohort, we estimate group based job satisfaction trajectories of respondents starting at age 25 and ending at age 39. Four job satisfaction trajectory groups are identified, a consistently high satisfaction group, a downward group, an upward group, and a lowest satisfaction group. We examine the effects of these trajectories on several physical and mental health outcomes of respondents in their early forties. We find membership in the lowest job satisfaction trajectory group to be negatively associated with all five mental health outcomes, supporting the accumulation of risks life course model. Those in the upward job satisfaction trajectory group have similar health outcomes to those in the high job satisfaction trajectory group, supporting the social mobility life course model. Overall, we find the relationship between job satisfaction trajectories and health to be stronger for mental health compared to physical health.
Bibliography Citation
Dirlam, Jonathan and Hui Zheng. "Job Satisfaction Developmental Trajectories and Health: A Life Course Perspective." Social Science and Medicine 178 (April 2017): 95-103.