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Author: Chen, Liwen
Resulting in 2 citations.
1. Addison, John T.
Chen, Liwen
Ozturk, Orgul Demet
Occupational Match Quality and Gender over Two Cohorts
IZA Discussion Paper No. 11114, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA), October 2017.
Also: http://ftp.iza.org/dp11114.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY97
Publisher: Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA)
Keyword(s): Career Patterns; Gender Differences; Mobility, Job; Occupations; Skills

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Job mobility, especially early in a career, is an important source of wage growth. This effect is typically attributed to heterogeneity in the quality of employee-employer matches, with individuals learning of their abilities and discovering the tasks at which they are most productive through job search. That is, job mobility enables better matches, and individuals move to better their labor market prospects and settle once they find a satisfactory match. In this paper, we show that there are gender differences in match quality and changes in match quality over the course of careers. In particular, we find that females are mismatched more than males. This is true even for females with the best early-career matches. However, the direction of the gender effect differs significantly by education. Only females among the college educated are more mismatched and are more likely to be over-qualified then their male counterparts. These results are seemingly driven by life events, such as child birth. For their part, college-educated males of the younger cohort are worse off in terms of match quality compared to the older cohort, while the new generation of women is doing better on average.
Bibliography Citation
Addison, John T., Liwen Chen and Orgul Demet Ozturk. "Occupational Match Quality and Gender over Two Cohorts." IZA Discussion Paper No. 11114, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA), October 2017.
2. Chen, Liwen
The Role of Family and Gender in the Transfer of and Returns to Human Capital
Ph.D. Dissertation, Department of Economics, University of South Carolina, 2018
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: ProQuest Dissertations & Theses (PQDT)
Keyword(s): Gender; Skills; Supervisor Characteristics; Wages

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This dissertation explores the role of family and gender in understanding the disparities in human capital accumulation and corresponding disparities in labor market outcomes.

The first chapter explores the relationship between workers' wages and the gender of their supervisor, conditioning on the occupational gender composition. It develops a theoretical model suggesting that supervisors' task assignment accuracy is affected disparately in occupations of different gender types, leading to varying degrees of skill mismatch among workers. This leads to average wage differences between workers with female supervisors and those with male supervisors in occupations of different gender types. Consistent with the theoretical predictions, the empirical evidence suggests that workers have better occupation-skill matches and higher average wages if they work with female supervisors in predominantly female occupations, compared to those with male supervisors; the opposite is true for workers in predominantly male occupations. Although not significant at the early career stage, supervisor wage effects emerge as a worker’s career develops. These findings emphasize the importance of supervisors' task assignment accuracy in workplace gender wage disparity, and underscore the necessity of integrating minority managers to the "gendered" organizational contexts.

Bibliography Citation
Chen, Liwen. The Role of Family and Gender in the Transfer of and Returns to Human Capital. Ph.D. Dissertation, Department of Economics, University of South Carolina, 2018.