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Author: Cavanagh, Shannon
Resulting in 3 citations.
1. Cavanagh, Shannon
Skalamera, Julie
Crosnoe, Robert
Health Behaviors and the Transition to Adulthood During the Great Recession
Presented: Washington DC, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, March-April 2016
Cohort(s): NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Cigarette Use (see Smoking); Economic Changes/Recession; Geocoded Data; Sleep; Transition, Adulthood; Unemployment Rate

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

As youth transition to adulthood—facing new social expectations, traversing new contexts, and establishing independence—their health behaviors tend to become less healthy. Recently, this transition has collided with a challenging historic context, the Great Recession. Using data from The National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 Cohort Child and Young Adult Sample (n = 3,096), we embed health behavior trajectories across the transition to adulthood in the context of the Great Recession. We examine multi-year trajectories of smoking, drinking, and sleep among young adults during the Great Recession but who differ in the extent their communities have been affected. Our findings suggest that, in hardest hit local economies, young adults experienced sleeping penalties and, among younger youth, drinking increases, relative to youth in less acutely affected communities. The collision of the transition to adulthood with the Great Recession may therefore have long-term implications for inequalities in health behaviors.
Bibliography Citation
Cavanagh, Shannon, Julie Skalamera and Robert Crosnoe. "Health Behaviors and the Transition to Adulthood During the Great Recession." Presented: Washington DC, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, March-April 2016.
2. Cavanagh, Shannon
Smith, Chelsea
Behler, Rachel
Ressler, Robert Wayne
Cozzolino, Elizabeth
Economic Volatility and Union Formation in Young Adulthood
Presented: Chicago IL, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April 2017
Cohort(s): NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Cohabitation; Economic Changes/Recession; Geocoded Data; Marital History/Transitions; Marriage

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The romantic lives of young adults have undergone profound change. Still, many continue to form unions during this life stage. Building on literature that highlights the significance of economic resources in shaping unions and life course theory's emphasis on linked lives and historical context, we consider how economic volatility, measured within families of origin, communities in which they live, and the historic moment (e.g., the Great Recession), can shape how young people's romantic lives unfolds. Using a sample drawn from the NLSY79-YA and geocode data, we estimated union formation sequences using person-month data and explored how sources of economic volatility shaped young people's romantic lives. Overall, three sequences emerged: mostly single, early cohabitation, and early and persistent marriage. Remaining single was the modal category. Income-to-needs volatility was associated with cohabitation, with young people raised in more volatile households, net of important covariates, more likely to cohabit than others.
Bibliography Citation
Cavanagh, Shannon, Chelsea Smith, Rachel Behler, Robert Wayne Ressler and Elizabeth Cozzolino. "Economic Volatility and Union Formation in Young Adulthood." Presented: Chicago IL, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April 2017.
3. Johnston, Carol A.
Cavanagh, Shannon
Crosnoe, Robert
Family Structure Patterns from Childhood through Adolescence and the Timing of Cohabitation among Diverse Groups of Young Adult Women and Men
Developmental Psychology published online (28 October 2019): DOI: 10.1037/dev0000842.
Also: https://psycnet.apa.org/fulltext/2019-64496-001.html
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: American Psychological Association (APA)
Keyword(s): Cohabitation; Family Structure; Modeling, Hazard/Event History/Survival/Duration; Modeling, Latent Class Analysis/Latent Transition Analysis; Stepfamilies; Transition, Adulthood

Family structure changes experienced by children are likely to shape their transitions into young adulthood, including the formation of their own romantic relationships. This study examined links between children's family structure trajectories from childhood through adolescence and their timing of entry into cohabitation as young adults, a transition with implications for future relationship instability through adulthood. Repeated measures latent class analysis identified configurations of family structures and family structure changes from birth through age 15 among 10,706 young people in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1979 Children and Young Adults. A Cox proportional hazard model then used the resulting classes to predict timing into cohabitation over the period from age 15 to age 38. Both timing of family structure transitions and the type of transitions (e.g., early transitioning into a stepfamily home) were associated with earlier entry into cohabitation. Notably, links between family structure trajectories and the timing of cohabitation differed by gender and race/ethnicity (Latinx, African American, White), such as a faster entry into cohabitation by women who experienced early entry into stepfamily structures. Regardless of gender, Latinx and White young adults were faster to enter into cohabitation if they lived in a stepfamily structure during early childhood.
Bibliography Citation
Johnston, Carol A., Shannon Cavanagh and Robert Crosnoe. "Family Structure Patterns from Childhood through Adolescence and the Timing of Cohabitation among Diverse Groups of Young Adult Women and Men." Developmental Psychology published online (28 October 2019): DOI: 10.1037/dev0000842.