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Author: Card, David E.
Resulting in 6 citations.
1. Abowd, John M.
Card, David E.
Intertemporal Labor Supply and Long-Term Employment Contracts
American Economic Review 77,1 (March 1987): 50-68.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/sici?sici=0002-8282%28198703%2977%3A1%3C50%3AILSALE%3E2.0.CO%3B2-%23
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: American Economic Association
Keyword(s): Earnings; Labor Supply; Modeling; Wage Rates

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Also: NBER Working Paper No. 1831, February 1986
We compare a contracting model and a labor supply model. One test is whether earnings changes are more variable than hours changes, as predicted by the labor supply model, or less variable, as predicted by the contracting model. We apply this test to two longitudinal surveys and find that earnings are somewhat more variable than hours for men who never change employers. The estimates suggest that changes in earnings and hours not associated with measurement error occur at fixed wage rates.
Bibliography Citation
Abowd, John M. and David E. Card. "Intertemporal Labor Supply and Long-Term Employment Contracts." American Economic Review 77,1 (March 1987): 50-68.
2. Abowd, John M.
Card, David E.
On the Covariance Structure of Earnings and Hours Changes
Econometrica 57,2 (March 1989): 411-445.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1912561
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: Department of Economics, Northwestern University
Keyword(s): Earnings; Labor Supply; Life Cycle Research; Modeling; Work Hours

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper presents an empirical analysis of individual earnings and hours data from three different longitudinal surveys. In the first part of the paper we catalog the main features of the covariance structure of earnings and hours changes. We find that this structure is very similar across data sets, and may be adequately summarized by a simple components-of-variance model, consisting of (i) serially uncorrelated measurement error, (ii) a shared component of earnings and hours with a second-order moving average covariance structure, and (iii) a nonstationary component that affects only the variances and contemporaneous covariances of earnings and hours. In the second part of the paper we offer an interpretation of this model in terms of a simple life-cycle labor supply model. On the assumption that we can identify individual productivity growth with the shared component of earnings and hours variation, we obtain estimates of the intertemporal substitution elasticity. The results are not favorable to the life-cycle model: most of the covariation of earnings and hours occurs at fixed hourly wage rates.
Bibliography Citation
Abowd, John M. and David E. Card. "On the Covariance Structure of Earnings and Hours Changes." Econometrica 57,2 (March 1989): 411-445.
3. Ashenfelter, Orley
Card, David E.
Handbook of Labor Economics Volume 4B
Elsevier: North Holland, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 2011
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Childhood Education, Early; Children, Preschool; Head Start; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Overview, Child Assessment Data

New Developments and Research on Labor Markets"; (volume 4B) proposes answers to this and other questions on important topics of public policy. Leading labor economists demonstrate how better data and advanced experiments help them apply economic theory, yielding sharper analyses and conclusions. The combinations of these improved empirical findings with new models enable the authors of these chapters to reveal how labor economists are developing new and innovative ways to measure key parameters and test important hypotheses.

Chapter 15: Human Capital Development Before Age Five (Almond & Currie)

Bibliography Citation
Ashenfelter, Orley and David E. Card. Handbook of Labor Economics Volume 4B. Elsevier: North Holland, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 2011.
4. Ashenfelter, Orley
Card, David E.
Using Longitudinal Data to Estimate the Employment Effects of the Minimum Wage
Discussion Paper No. 98, Centre for Labour Economics, London School of Economics, September 1981
Cohort(s): Young Men, Young Women
Publisher: London School of Economics and Political Science
Keyword(s): Labor Force Participation; Minimum Wage; Mobility, Job

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper investigates, using micro-economic data, the impact of the minimum wage law on employment in the covered sector of the economy. Specifically, the effect of changes in the minimum wage on movements of employees out of the covered sector is tested. In addition, the direction of these movements, whether into employment outside the covered sector or into withdrawal from the labor force or into unemployment is explored.
Bibliography Citation
Ashenfelter, Orley and David E. Card. "Using Longitudinal Data to Estimate the Employment Effects of the Minimum Wage." Discussion Paper No. 98, Centre for Labour Economics, London School of Economics, September 1981.
5. Card, David E.
Using Geographic Variation in College Proximity to Estimate the Return to Schooling
NBER Working Paper No. 4483, National Bureau of Economic Research, October, October 1993.
Also: http://nber.nber.org/papers/W4483
Cohort(s): Young Men
Publisher: National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)
Keyword(s): Colleges; Earnings; Education; Educational Attainment; Educational Returns; Family Background and Culture; Modeling; Schooling; Variables, Instrumental

A convincing analysis of the causal link between schooling and earnings requires an exogenous source of variation in education outcomes. This paper explores the use of college proximity as an exogenous determinant of schooling. Analysis of the NLS Young Men Cohort reveals that men who grew up in local labor markets with a nearby college have significantly higher education and earnings than other men. The education and earnings gains are concentrated among men with poorly-educated parents -- men who would otherwise stop schooling at relatively low levels. When college proximity is taken as an exogenous determinant of 'schooling the implied instrumental variables estimates of the return to schooling are 25-60% higher than conventional ordinary least squares estimates. Since the effect of a nearby college on schooling attainment vanes by family background it is possible to test whether college proximity is a legitimately exogenous determinant of schooling. The results affirm that marginal returns to education among children of less-educated parents are as high and perhaps much higher than the rates of return estimated by conventional methods.
Bibliography Citation
Card, David E. "Using Geographic Variation in College Proximity to Estimate the Return to Schooling." NBER Working Paper No. 4483, National Bureau of Economic Research, October, October 1993.
6. Card, David E.
Blank, Rebecca M.
Finding Jobs: Work and Welfare Reform
New York, NY: Russell Sage Foundation, 2000
Cohort(s): NLSY79, Young Men, Young Women
Publisher: Russell Sage Foundation
Keyword(s): Labor Market Segmentation; Mothers, Education; Skills; Wage Growth; Wage Levels

Finding Jobs offers a thorough examination of the low-skill labor market and its capacity to sustain this rising tide of workers, many of whom are single mothers with limited education. Each chapter examines specific trends in the labor market to ask such questions as: How secure are these low-skill jobs, particularly in the event of a recession? What can these workers expect in terms of wage growth and career advancement opportunities? How will a surge in the workforce affect opportunities for those already employed in low-skill jobs?
Bibliography Citation
Card, David E. and Rebecca M. Blank. Finding Jobs: Work and Welfare Reform. New York, NY: Russell Sage Foundation, 2000.