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Author: Ashenfelter, Orley
Resulting in 7 citations.
1. Ashenfelter, Orley
Card, David E.
Handbook of Labor Economics Volume 4B
Elsevier: North Holland, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 2011
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Childhood Education, Early; Children, Preschool; Head Start; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Overview, Child Assessment Data

New Developments and Research on Labor Markets"; (volume 4B) proposes answers to this and other questions on important topics of public policy. Leading labor economists demonstrate how better data and advanced experiments help them apply economic theory, yielding sharper analyses and conclusions. The combinations of these improved empirical findings with new models enable the authors of these chapters to reveal how labor economists are developing new and innovative ways to measure key parameters and test important hypotheses.

Chapter 15: Human Capital Development Before Age Five (Almond & Currie)

Bibliography Citation
Ashenfelter, Orley and David E. Card. Handbook of Labor Economics Volume 4B. Elsevier: North Holland, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 2011.
2. Ashenfelter, Orley
Card, David E.
Using Longitudinal Data to Estimate the Employment Effects of the Minimum Wage
Discussion Paper No. 98, Centre for Labour Economics, London School of Economics, September 1981
Cohort(s): Young Men, Young Women
Publisher: London School of Economics and Political Science
Keyword(s): Labor Force Participation; Minimum Wage; Mobility, Job

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper investigates, using micro-economic data, the impact of the minimum wage law on employment in the covered sector of the economy. Specifically, the effect of changes in the minimum wage on movements of employees out of the covered sector is tested. In addition, the direction of these movements, whether into employment outside the covered sector or into withdrawal from the labor force or into unemployment is explored.
Bibliography Citation
Ashenfelter, Orley and David E. Card. "Using Longitudinal Data to Estimate the Employment Effects of the Minimum Wage." Discussion Paper No. 98, Centre for Labour Economics, London School of Economics, September 1981.
3. Ashenfelter, Orley
Oaxaca, Ronald L.
Secretary of Labor's Invitational Conference on the National Longitudinal Surveys of Young Men and Young Women
Report, Employment and Training Administration, U.S. Department of Labor, 1979
Cohort(s): Young Men, Young Women
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Earnings; Employment; Migration; Mobility, Job

The report summarizes the purpose and results of a conference on the NLS of Young Men and Young Women. The conference was held on March 29-30, l979 in Tucson, Arizona. Six scholarly papers were prepared for the conference. These papers represented studies which illustrated how the NLS youth sample could be used to shed light on important youth labor market phenomenon.
Bibliography Citation
Ashenfelter, Orley and Ronald L. Oaxaca. "Secretary of Labor's Invitational Conference on the National Longitudinal Surveys of Young Men and Young Women." Report, Employment and Training Administration, U.S. Department of Labor, 1979.
4. Ashenfelter, Orley
Rouse, Cecilia Elena
Schooling, Intelligence, and Income in America: Cracks in the Bell Curve
NBER Working Paper No. 6902, National Bureau of Economic Research, January 1999.
Also: http://nber.nber.org/papers/W6902
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)
Keyword(s): Education; Educational Aspirations/Expectations; Educational Returns; Family Background; Human Capital; Income; Racial Differences; Schooling

One of the best documented relationships in economics is the link between education and income: higher educated people have higher incomes. Advocates argue that education provides skills, or human capital, that raises an individual's productivity. Critics argue that the documented relationship is not causal. Education does not generate higher incomes; instead, individuals with higher ability receive more education and more income. This essay reviews the evidence on the relationship between education and income. We focus on recent studies that have attempted to determine the causal effect of education on income by either comparing income and education differences within families or using exogenous determinants of schooling in what are sometimes called natural experiments. In addition, we assess the potential for education to reduce income disparities by presenting evidence on the return to education for people of differing family backgrounds and measured ability. The results of all these studies are surprisingly consistent: they indicate that the return to schooling is not caused by an omitted correlation between ability and schooling. Moreover, we find no evidence that the return to schooling differs significantly by family background or by the measured ability of the student.
Bibliography Citation
Ashenfelter, Orley and Cecilia Elena Rouse. "Schooling, Intelligence, and Income in America: Cracks in the Bell Curve." NBER Working Paper No. 6902, National Bureau of Economic Research, January 1999.
5. Ashenfelter, Orley
Solon, Gary
Longitudinal Labor Market Data: Sources, Uses, and Limitations
Report, Washington DC: Assessment of Labor Force Measurements for Policy Formulation, National Council on Employment Policy, 1982
Cohort(s): NLS General
Publisher: Author
Keyword(s): Longitudinal Surveys; Research Methodology

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study investigates the major sources of longitudinal data and their relative merits. This type of data has proven especially useful for three types of research: measurement and analysis of changes in individuals' status over time; analysis of intertemporal relationships; and analysis that must control for unobserved variables. These data have enabled other areas of research to be developed--which otherwise would have gone unnoticed. In addition, longitudinal data have increased research findings of previously unstable analytical assumptions.
Bibliography Citation
Ashenfelter, Orley and Gary Solon. "Longitudinal Labor Market Data: Sources, Uses, and Limitations." Report, Washington DC: Assessment of Labor Force Measurements for Policy Formulation, National Council on Employment Policy, 1982.
6. Ashenfelter, Orley
Zimmerman, David J.
Estimates of the Returns to Schooling from Sibling Data: Fathers Sons and Brothers
The Review of Economics and Statistics 79,1 (February 1997): 1-9.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2951427
Cohort(s): Older Men, Young Men
Publisher: Harvard University Press
Keyword(s): Brothers; Educational Returns; Fathers and Sons; Schooling; Siblings

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Data on brothers and on fathers and sons from the National Longitudinal Survey are used to consider the impact of omitted variables and measurement errors on the economic returns to schooling. The analysis suggests that the upward bias in estimated returns due to omitted variables is likely offset by an equal downward bias resulting from measurement errors in reported schooling. Controlling for both of these potential sources of bias yields results comparable to conventional repression estimates of the economic return to schooling. (Copyright 1997 by the President and Fellows of Harvard College and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.)
Bibliography Citation
Ashenfelter, Orley and David J. Zimmerman. "Estimates of the Returns to Schooling from Sibling Data: Fathers Sons and Brothers." The Review of Economics and Statistics 79,1 (February 1997): 1-9.
7. Ashenfelter, Orley
Zimmerman, David J.
Estimates of the Returns to Schooling from Sibling Data: Fathers, Sons, and Brothers
NBER Working Paper No. 4491, National Bureau of Economic Research, October 1993.
Also: http://nber.nber.org/papers/W4491
Cohort(s): Older Men, Young Men
Publisher: National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)
Keyword(s): Brothers; Educational Returns; Family Background; Pairs (also see Siblings); Schooling; Siblings

This paper uses data on brothers, and fathers and sons, to estimate the economic returns to schooling. Its goal is to determine whether the correlation between earnings and schooling is due, in part, to the correlation between family backgrounds and schooling. The basic idea is to contrast the differences between the schooling of brothers, and fathers and sons, with the differences in their respective earnings. Since individuals linked by family affiliation are more likely to have similar innate ability and family backgrounds than randomly selected individuals our procedure provides a straightforward control for unobserved family attributes. The empirical results indicate that in the sample of brothers the ordinary least squares estimates of the return to schooling may be biased upward by some 25% by the omission of family background factors. Adjustments for measurement error, however, imply that the intrafamily estimate of the returns to schooling is biased downward by about 25% also, so that the ordinary least squares estimate suffers from very little overall bias. Using data on fathers and sons introduces some ambiguity into these findings, as commonly used specification tests reject the simplest models of the role of family background in the determination of earnings.
Bibliography Citation
Ashenfelter, Orley and David J. Zimmerman. "Estimates of the Returns to Schooling from Sibling Data: Fathers, Sons, and Brothers." NBER Working Paper No. 4491, National Bureau of Economic Research, October 1993.