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Author: Bartel, Ann P.
Resulting in 14 citations.
1. Bartel, Ann P.
Race Differences in Job Satisfaction: A Reappraisal
Journal of Human Resources 16,2 (Spring 1981): 294-303.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/145514
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: University of Wisconsin Press
Keyword(s): Discrimination, Racial/Ethnic; Job Satisfaction; Occupational Aspirations; Wages

This article has shown that the blacks in the NLS Older Men sample were significantly more satisfied with their jobs in l966, l969, and l971 than whites with similar personal, job and location characteristics. While blacks do earn lower full wages than whites and should therefore be less satisfied, discrimination may have also caused blacks to be satisfied with less. In the case of older men, this direct effect of race on job satisfaction dominates and becomes increasingly important over time. For other cohorts, the available evidence is also consistent with greater impact of the effect over time.
Bibliography Citation
Bartel, Ann P. "Race Differences in Job Satisfaction: A Reappraisal." Journal of Human Resources 16,2 (Spring 1981): 294-303.
2. Bartel, Ann P.
The Migration Decision: What Role Does Job Mobility Play?
American Economic Review 69,5 (December 1979): 775-788.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1813646
Cohort(s): Older Men, Young Men
Publisher: American Economic Association
Keyword(s): Children; Job Tenure; Layoffs; Migration; Mobility; Mobility, Job; Quits

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper argues that one must take account of the relationship between job mobility and migration when studying the determinants and consequences of the decision to migrate. The results indicate that there are three distinctly different types of geographic moves (associated with either a quit, layoff, or transfer) and an analysis that ignores this distinction can often lead to misleading conclusions about the role of such variables as the wage, the wife's labor force participation, the presence of school children and the length of residence in the migration process.
Bibliography Citation
Bartel, Ann P. "The Migration Decision: What Role Does Job Mobility Play?" American Economic Review 69,5 (December 1979): 775-788.
3. Bartel, Ann P.
Wages, Nonwage Job Characteristics, and Labor Mobility
Industrial and Labor Relations Review 35,4 (July 1982): 578-589.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2522669
Cohort(s): Older Men, Young Men
Publisher: New York State School of Industrial and Labor Relations, Cornell University
Keyword(s): Blue-Collar Jobs; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Mobility; Mobility, Labor Market; Quality of Employment Survey (QES); Quits; Wages; Working Conditions

The effects of a set of nonwage job attributes on the quit decisions of young and middle-aged men are examined. The data set was constructed by merging data in the National Longitudinal Surveys of Young and Mature Men with data from the Dictionary of Occupational Titles file and the Bureau of Economic Analysis file on fringe benefits. The empirical analysis demonstrates that some nonwage job attributes have significant influence on worker quit behavior and that there are important differences in the impact of the nonwage job attributes across age groups. Young men are significantly more likely than older men to quit repetitious jobs, for example, whereas the presence of bad working conditions is a more important element in the quit decisions of the older cohort. The results also indicate that, for the older men, fringe benefits have a stronger impact on quit decisions than wages do. Further evidence on age differences is furnished through an analysis of panel data from the Quality of Employment Survey. (ABI/Inform)
Bibliography Citation
Bartel, Ann P. "Wages, Nonwage Job Characteristics, and Labor Mobility." Industrial and Labor Relations Review 35,4 (July 1982): 578-589.
4. Bartel, Ann P.
Borjas, George J.
Middle-Age Job Mobility: Its Determinants and Consequences
Working Paper, Columbia University Graduate School of Business, 1976
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: Columbia University Graduate School of Business
Keyword(s): Job Satisfaction; Job Tenure; Layoffs; Mobility; Mobility, Job; Pensions; Quits; Wages; Wages, Reservation; Wives, Work

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The authors examine the determinants of quits and argue that there are basically three types of quit occurrences: 1. due to exogenous or personal factors; 2. because of dissatisfaction with the current job; 3. due to a better job. In keeping with this system, it is found that the probability of quitting for job-related reasons is negatively related to the reservation wage. The probability of quitting for personal reasons is not related to the reservation wage since this type of quit is due to exogenous forces. The probability of a layoff was positively related to the individual's current wage. It is also found that job characteristics such as pension plans and hours of work affected job-related quits but did not determine quitting for personal reasons. Similarly, personal characteristics such as time remaining in the labor force and the wife's labor force status had systematic effects on job-related quits and insignificant effects on exogenous quits. There is also strong evidence of serial correlation in job mobility. That is, there exists a group of individuals who continuously show high propensities to separate both voluntarily and involuntarily. The analysis of the consequences of job mobility indicated the need to distinguish between types of quits. That is, individuals who were pulled from their jobs had higher immediate wage gains than stayers, while individuals who were pushed had smaller wage gains than stayers.
Bibliography Citation
Bartel, Ann P. and George J. Borjas. "Middle-Age Job Mobility: Its Determinants and Consequences." Working Paper, Columbia University Graduate School of Business, 1976.
5. Bartel, Ann P.
Borjas, George J.
Wage Growth and Job Turnover: An Empirical Analysis
In: Studies in Labor Markets. S. Rosen, ed. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press, 1981
Cohort(s): Older Men, Young Men
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
Keyword(s): Job Satisfaction; Job Tenure; Job Turnover; Mobility; Mobility, Job; Quits; Wage Growth; Work History

The authors focus on documenting how labor turnover systematically affects the rate of growth in wages both across jobs and within the job. The working hypothesis is to interpret wage growth to be the result of human capital investments, both general and specific to the job. The authors interpret wage growth across jobs as being due to changes in the individual's human capital stock resulting from "mobility" investments (e.g. search) and losses of specific training incurred when job separation takes place.
Bibliography Citation
Bartel, Ann P. and George J. Borjas. "Wage Growth and Job Turnover: An Empirical Analysis" In: Studies in Labor Markets. S. Rosen, ed. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press, 1981
6. Bartel, Ann P.
Sicherman, Nachum
Technological Change and On-the-Job Training of Young Workers
Presented: New York, NY, Columbia, University, NBER Summer Institute in Labor Studies, July 26-30, 1993
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)
Keyword(s): High School Completion/Graduates; Human Capital; Technology/Technological Changes; Training, On-the-Job

We use the NLSY to analyze the relationship between technological change and on-the-job training. The theoretical predictions are ambiguous: While higher rates of obsolescence are likely to decrease investment, on-the-job training will increase if technological change increases the productivity of human capital, reduces the cost of training, or increases the value of time in training relative to work. Our major empirical findings are: (1) Technological change induces firms to provide short (i.e. duration of less than a month) training to their employees, and we, therefore, do not observe a significant effect of technological change on hours of training. (2) Workers who receive training because of technological change are either high school graduates or those with eight or fewer years of schooling. (3) Workers who did not receive training in the previous year are more likely to be trained as a result of higher rates of technological change.
Bibliography Citation
Bartel, Ann P. and Nachum Sicherman. "Technological Change and On-the-Job Training of Young Workers." Presented: New York, NY, Columbia, University, NBER Summer Institute in Labor Studies, July 26-30, 1993.
7. Bartel, Ann P.
Sicherman, Nachum
Technological Change and Retirement Decisions of Older Workers
Journal of Labor Economics 11,1 (January 1993): 162-183.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2535188
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
Keyword(s): Human Capital Theory; Retirement; Technology/Technological Changes; Training, Occupational

According to human capital theory, technological change will influence the retirement decisions of older workers in two ways. First, workers in industries with high rates of technological change will retire later if there is a net positive correlation between technological change and on-the-job training. Second, an unexpected change in the rate of technological change will induce older workers to retire sooner because the required amount of retraining will be an unattractive investment. We matched industry data on productivity growth and occupational data on required training with data from the National Longitudinal Surveys of Older Men to test these hypotheses. Our results support both hypotheses.
Bibliography Citation
Bartel, Ann P. and Nachum Sicherman. "Technological Change and Retirement Decisions of Older Workers." Journal of Labor Economics 11,1 (January 1993): 162-183.
8. Bartel, Ann P.
Sicherman, Nachum
Technological Change and the Careers of Older Workers
NBER Working Paper No. 3433, National Bureau of Economic Research, 1990.
Also: NBER Reprint No. 1802.
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)
Keyword(s): Human Capital Theory; Industrial Sector; Industrial Training; Job Training; Mobility, Interfirm; Retirement; Technology/Technological Changes; Training

Recent research has shown that technological change has important labor market implications; this paper demonstrates one of the avenues through which this occurs. According to the theory of human capital, technological change will influence the retirement decisions of older workers in two ways. First, workers in industries characterized by high rates of technological change will have later retirement ages because these industries require larger amounts of on-the-job training. Second, an unexpected change in the industry's rate of technological change will induce older workers to retire sooner because the required amount of retraining will be an unattractive investment. The authors matched time-series data on rates of technological change and required amounts of training in 35 industrial sectors with data from the NLS Older Men's Survey to test these hypotheses. Results strongly supported both hypotheses.
Bibliography Citation
Bartel, Ann P. and Nachum Sicherman. "Technological Change and the Careers of Older Workers." NBER Working Paper No. 3433, National Bureau of Economic Research, 1990.
9. Bartel, Ann P.
Sicherman, Nachum
Technological Change and the Skill Acquisition of Young Workers
NBER Working Paper No. 5107, National Bureau of Economic Research, May 1995.
Also: http://nber.nber.org/papers/W5107
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)
Keyword(s): Skills; Technology/Technological Changes; Training; Training, Employee; Training, On-the-Job

The National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY) and six proxies for industry rates of technological change, we study the impact of technological change on skill accumulation among young male workers in the manufacturing sector during the time period 1987 through 1992. Production workers in manufacturing industries with higher rates of technological change are more likely to receive formal company training, but not other types of training. An important finding is that, while more educated workers are more likely to receive formal company training, the training gap between the highly educated and the less educated narrows, on average, as the rate of technological change increases. The positive effect of technological change on hours of training is due largely to an increase in the incidence of training, not in the number of hours per training spell. Full-text available on-line: http://nber.nber.org/papers/W5107
Bibliography Citation
Bartel, Ann P. and Nachum Sicherman. "Technological Change and the Skill Acquisition of Young Workers." NBER Working Paper No. 5107, National Bureau of Economic Research, May 1995.
10. Bartel, Ann P.
Sicherman, Nachum
Technological Change and the Skill Acquisition of Young Workers
Journal of Labor Economics 16,4 (October 1998): 718-755.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1086/209904
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
Keyword(s): Human Capital; Industrial Training; Modeling; Skills; Technology/Technological Changes; Training; Training, On-the-Job

Since technological change influences the rate at which human capital obsolesces and also increases the uncertainty associated with human capital investments, training may increase or decrease at higher rates of technological change. Using the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, we find that production workers in manufacturing industries with higher rates of technological change are more likely to receive formal company training. At higher rates of technological change, the training gap between the more and less educated narrows, low-skilled nonproduction workers receive significantly more training than higher-skilled nonproduction workers, and the proportion of individuals receiving training increases.
Bibliography Citation
Bartel, Ann P. and Nachum Sicherman. "Technological Change and the Skill Acquisition of Young Workers." Journal of Labor Economics 16,4 (October 1998): 718-755.
11. Bartel, Ann P.
Sicherman, Nachum
Technological Change and Wages: An Inter-Industry Analysis
NBER Working Paper No. 5941, National Bureau of Economic Research, February 1997.
Also: http://nber.nber.org/papers/W5941
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)
Keyword(s): Education; Heterogeneity; High School Curriculum; Skills; Technology/Technological Changes; Transfers, Skill; Wage Theory; Wages

Previous research has found evidence that wages in industries characterized as "high tech," or subject to higher rates of technological change, are higher. In addition, there is evidence that - A skill-based technological change is responsible for the dramatic increase in the earnings of more educated workers relative to less educated workers that took place during the 1980s. In this paper, we match a variety of industry level measures of technological change to a panel of young workers observed between 1979 and 1993 (NLSY) and examine the role played by unobserved heterogeneity in explaining the positive relationships between technological change and wages, and between technological change and the education premium. We find evidence that the wage premium associated with technological change is primarily due to the sorting of better workers into those industries. In addition, the education premium associated with technological change is found to be the result of an increase in demand for the innate ability or other observable characteristics of more educated workers. Full-text available on-line: http://nber.nber.org/papers/W5941
Bibliography Citation
Bartel, Ann P. and Nachum Sicherman. "Technological Change and Wages: An Inter-Industry Analysis." NBER Working Paper No. 5941, National Bureau of Economic Research, February 1997.
12. Bartel, Ann P.
Sicherman, Nachum
Technological Change and Wages: An Interindustry Analysis
Journal of Political Economy 107,2 (April 1999): 285-325.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1086/250061
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
Keyword(s): Education; Industrial Classification; Technology/Technological Changes; Wages

Previous research has shown that wages in industries characterized by higher rates of technological change are higher. In addition, there is evidence that skill-biased technological change is responsible for the dramatic increase in the earnings of more educated workers relative to less educated workers that took place during the 1980s. In this paper, we match a variety of industry-level measures of technological change to a panel of young workers, observed between 1979 and 1993 (NLSY), and examine the role played by observed and unobserved heterogeneity in explaining the positive relationships between technological change and wages and between technological change and the education premium. We find that the wage premium associated with technological change is primarily due to the sorting of more able workers into those industries, and this premium is unrelated to any sorting based on gender or race. In addition, the education premium associated with technological change is the result of a greater demand for the innate ability or other unobserved characteristics of more educated workers.
Bibliography Citation
Bartel, Ann P. and Nachum Sicherman. "Technological Change and Wages: An Interindustry Analysis." Journal of Political Economy 107,2 (April 1999): 285-325.
13. Doran, Elizabeth L.
Bartel, Ann P.
Waldfogel, Jane
Gender in the Labor Market: The Role of Equal Opportunity and Family-Friendly Policies
NBER Working Paper No. 25378, National Bureau of Economic Research, December 2018.
Also: https://www.nber.org/papers/w25378
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)
Keyword(s): American Time Use Survey (ATUS); Child Care; Gender Differences; Job Characteristics; Leave, Family or Maternity/Paternity; Part-Time Work; Wage Gap

Although the gender wage gap in the U.S. has narrowed, women's career trajectories diverge from men's after the birth of children, suggesting a potential role for family-friendly policies. We provide new evidence on employer provision of these policies. Using the American Time Use Survey, we find that women are less likely than men to have access to any employer-provided paid leave and this differential is entirely explained by part-time status. Using the NLSY97, we find that young women are more likely to have access to specifically designated paid parental leave, even in part-time jobs. Both datasets show insignificant gender differentials in access to employer-subsidized child care and access to scheduling flexibility. We conclude with a discussion of policy implications
Bibliography Citation
Doran, Elizabeth L., Ann P. Bartel and Jane Waldfogel. "Gender in the Labor Market: The Role of Equal Opportunity and Family-Friendly Policies." NBER Working Paper No. 25378, National Bureau of Economic Research, December 2018.
14. Doran, Elizabeth L.
Bartel, Ann P.
Waldfogel, Jane
Gender in the Labor Market: The Role of Equal Opportunity and Family-Friendly Policies
RSF: The Russell Sage Foundation Journal of the Social Sciences 5,5: Improving Employment and Earnings in Twenty-First Century Labor Markets (December 2019): 168-197.
Also: https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7758/rsf.2019.5.5.09
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Russell Sage Foundation
Keyword(s): American Time Use Survey (ATUS); Benefits; Gender Differences; Leave, Family or Maternity/Paternity

Although the gender wage gap in the United States has narrowed, women's career trajectories diverge from men's after the birth of children, suggesting a potential role for family-friendly policies. We provide new evidence on employer provision of these policies. Using the American Time Use Survey, we find that women are less likely than men to have access to any employer-provided paid leave and this differential is entirely explained by part-time status. Using the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997, we find that young women are more likely to have access to specifically designated paid parental leave, even in part-time jobs. Both data sets show insignificant gender differentials in access to employer-subsidized childcare and access to scheduling flexibility. We conclude with a discussion of policy implications.
Bibliography Citation
Doran, Elizabeth L., Ann P. Bartel and Jane Waldfogel. "Gender in the Labor Market: The Role of Equal Opportunity and Family-Friendly Policies." RSF: The Russell Sage Foundation Journal of the Social Sciences 5,5: Improving Employment and Earnings in Twenty-First Century Labor Markets (December 2019): 168-197.