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Title: Does Military Service Continue to Facilitate Desistance? Revisiting Theory and Practice
Resulting in 1 citation.
1. Abeling-Judge, David
Does Military Service Continue to Facilitate Desistance? Revisiting Theory and Practice
Deviant Behavior published online (10 February 2019): DOI: 10.1080/01639625.2019.1575541.
Also: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/01639625.2019.1575541
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
Keyword(s): Crime; Military Service

Military service can provide a source of behavioral desistance but may also increase different types of offending behavior. In addition, changes in law and social practice regarding recruitment may hinder the crime reducing effect. I examined the desistance effect of military service in an ongoing longitudinal study, specifically the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997. The study identifies limited involvement in service, either in active or reservist capacity, and inconsistent influences on subsequent criminal behavior. The findings expand the relevance of socio-cultural considerations in life-course research and desistance in particular. The current study also suggests opportunities for theoretical re-evaluation of the impact of military service on crime.
Bibliography Citation
Abeling-Judge, David. "Does Military Service Continue to Facilitate Desistance? Revisiting Theory and Practice." Deviant Behavior published online (10 February 2019): DOI: 10.1080/01639625.2019.1575541.