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Author: Abeling-Judge, David
Resulting in 2 citations.
1. Abeling-Judge, David
Different Social Influences and Desistance From Crime
Criminal Justice and Behavior 43,9 (September 2016): 1225-1241.
Also: http://cjb.sagepub.com/content/43/9/1225
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Arrests; Crime; Employment; Marriage

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Desistance from crime has been associated with numerous social influences. Although researchers have explored different theoretical rationales and underlying mechanisms between external social developments and individual changes in behavior, little focus has been given to the individual versus cumulative influences, and social complexities, of different informal controls influencing reduction in criminal behavior. The current study explores the individual and combined impact of marriage and employment on arrest using 17 years of monthly level data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (1997). The results address isolated and cumulative influences of each social control on arrest and provide insight into the relevance of acknowledging the complexities of social events developing over time.
Bibliography Citation
Abeling-Judge, David. "Different Social Influences and Desistance From Crime." Criminal Justice and Behavior 43,9 (September 2016): 1225-1241.
2. Abeling-Judge, David
Social Capital, Social Controls, and Desistance from Crime
Presented: Atlanta GA, American Society of Criminology Annual Meeting, November 2018
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: American Society of Criminology
Keyword(s): Crime; Family Influences; Social Capital

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Informal social controls facilitate desistance from crime through establishing specific bonds, such as employment, but desistance research has not sufficiently examined the complex sequencing of how an offender may secure employment in the first place. Both the ability to obtain employment and the factors instilling a personal connection to the workplace (i.e., establishing a social control) may be better understood by incorporating an additional theoretical perspective: social capital. Social capital articulates the importance of utilizing existing social resources, such as family ties or opportunities provided by friends, and could increase informal social controls to further facilitate desistance. The current study explores this connection through an examination of social capital, informal social control, offense, and additional control variables in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997. Offenders were divided into different race and gender subsets, with lagged models examining how social capital and employment predict offending behavior. Findings provide opportunities to re-examine theoretical and practical influences of desistance, and elaborate on race and gender discrepancies in crime.
Bibliography Citation
Abeling-Judge, David. "Social Capital, Social Controls, and Desistance from Crime." Presented: Atlanta GA, American Society of Criminology Annual Meeting, November 2018.