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Title: Depression, Work and Family Roles, and the Gendered Life Course
Resulting in 1 citation.
1. Leupp, Katrina M.
Depression, Work and Family Roles, and the Gendered Life Course
Journal of Health and Social Behavior 58,4 (December 2017): 422-441.
Also: http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/0022146517737309
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Depression (see also CESD); Gender Attitudes/Roles; Gender Differences; Health, Mental; Life Course; Maternal Employment

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Despite the importance of employment for shaping mental health over the life course, little is known about how the mental health benefits of employment change as individuals age through their prime employment and child-rearing years. This study examines the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1979 Cohort (N = 8,931), following respondents from their late 20s to mid-50s. Results suggest that among women, the aging of children is especially salient for shaping the mental health consequences of employment. Young children diminish the protective effect of mothers' full- and part-time employment, but the salubrious effects of paid work increase as children get older. The benefit of employment for men’s mental health also changes over time, but it is the aging of men themselves rather than their children that alters the magnitude of full-time employment’s protective effect. Findings suggest the contribution of employment to life course mental health remains tethered to traditional gender roles.
Bibliography Citation
Leupp, Katrina M. "Depression, Work and Family Roles, and the Gendered Life Course." Journal of Health and Social Behavior 58,4 (December 2017): 422-441.