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Title: Crossing Boundaries: "Some College" and the Role of Schools in Educational Assortative Mating
Resulting in 1 citation.
1. McClendon, David
Crossing Boundaries: "Some College" and the Role of Schools in Educational Assortative Mating
Presented: Chicago IL, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April 2017
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Educational Attainment; Marriage

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

As more Americans delay marriage and meet romantic partners online, schools may be becoming less important for educational assortative mating. However, although fewer people meet their spouse as students, social ties formed during college may continue to shape partner choice later in adulthood. Here I focus on young adults with "some college, no degree" to see what, if any, marriage-market benefit is gained from exposure to highly-educated social networks in college. Using data from NLSY-1997, including newly collected postsecondary transcripts, I find young adults with “some college” are more likely than their less educated peers to marry a college graduate, especially if they attended a 4-year school. But young adults with bachelor’s degrees still hold an advantage, even after controlling for duration of schooling. The results support the role of schools in shaping opportunities to meet partners but highlight the value of a college degree on the marriage market.
Bibliography Citation
McClendon, David. "Crossing Boundaries: "Some College" and the Role of Schools in Educational Assortative Mating." Presented: Chicago IL, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April 2017.