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Source: University of Maryland
Resulting in 2 citations.
1. Champaloux, Steven William
Impact of Childhood and Adolescent Chronic Health Conditions on Educational Attainment
Ph.D. Dissertation, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Maryland, College Park, 2013
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: University of Maryland
Keyword(s): Adolescent health; Educational Attainment; Health, Chronic Conditions; High School Completion/Graduates; Modeling

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using data from the National Longitudinal Study of Youth - Cohort 1997, multivariate logistic regression models were fit to examine the associations between type, onset of chronic health conditions, as well as youth limited by chronic health conditions and their impact on educational attainment. The cohort’s sample size was 8,984 and participants were followed up through 2009. Chronic health conditions were defined by the 1997 parent questionnaire and the 2002 youth questionnaire. Educational attainment was defined by completion of high school by 21 years of age. Academic, psychosocial, neighborhood and school factors were examined and potential mediators and effect modifiers were identified.
Bibliography Citation
Champaloux, Steven William. Impact of Childhood and Adolescent Chronic Health Conditions on Educational Attainment. Ph.D. Dissertation, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Maryland, College Park, 2013.
2. Sun, Shengwei
Intersecting Inequalities in the Paid Care Work Sector Under Changing Social and Economic Contexts
Ph.D. Dissertation, Department of Sociology, University of Maryland, College Park, 2018.
Also: https://drum.lib.umd.edu/handle/1903/21305
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY97
Publisher: University of Maryland
Keyword(s): Gender Attitudes/Roles; Occupations, Male; Occupations, Non-Traditional; Racial Equality/Inequality

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This dissertation focuses on the expanding paid care work sector as a key terrain for examining labor market inequalities in the United States and China, with three papers attending to different aspects of social stratification. In the U.S., men's presence in care work jobs remains rare despite the fast job growth in education and health care and the decline in traditionally male-dominated manufacturing sectors. Despite growing public interest, little is known about the reasons and pathways of men's transition into care work jobs. The popular discourse attributes men's reluctance to a matter of gender identity, whereas scholars adopting a structural approach argue that men have little incentive to enter care work jobs mainly because those jobs are underpaid. The first paper examines how well the structural and cultural approaches, respectively, explain why men enter care work jobs or not. Moreover, care work jobs have been increasingly polarized in terms of pay and job security since the 1970s, and the polarizing pattern of care work job growth is characterized by racial disparity. Is such pattern driven by racial disparity in education and labor market experience, and/or by racial discrimination? The second paper addresses this question by examining the changing determinants of entering into low-paying versus middle-to-high-paying care work jobs between two cohorts of young men who joined the workforce under different labor market conditions. Findings suggest a persisting logic of a racialized "labor queue" underlying the changing patterns of racial inequality.
Bibliography Citation
Sun, Shengwei. Intersecting Inequalities in the Paid Care Work Sector Under Changing Social and Economic Contexts. Ph.D. Dissertation, Department of Sociology, University of Maryland, College Park, 2018..