Search Results

Source: MA Thesis
Resulting in 20 citations.
1. Bicaksiz, A.
PC-based Model for Estimating Regional Recruit Markets
M.A. Thesis, Naval Postgraduate School - Monterey CA, 1992
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: UMI - University Microfilms, Bell and Howell Information and Learning
Keyword(s): Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Labor Force Participation; Manpower Research; Military Recruitment; Military Service; Modeling; Program Participation/Evaluation

This thesis develops a personal-computer-based (PC-based) model to utilize research results for the estimation of male high quality (HQ) and hightech (HITEC) qualified military available (QMA) population. HQ QMA are 17-21 year-old high school graduates scoring above the 50th percentile on the Armed Forces Qualification Test (AFQT). HITEC QMA are the HQ QMA who are mentally eligible for highly technical military occupations. Research underlying the PC based model estimates multinomial logistic regression equations using the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth Labor Force Behavior (NLSY) data over a set of explanatory variables for which data are available at the county level. Using the PC-based model, nationwide county-level measures of regional male recruit markets by size and mental quality for 1990 through 2010 are estimated. The PC-based model and the nationwide market estimates may be useful in recruiting management decisions such as resource allocation and recruiter goaling.
Bibliography Citation
Bicaksiz, A. PC-based Model for Estimating Regional Recruit Markets. M.A. Thesis, Naval Postgraduate School - Monterey CA, 1992.
2. Blew, Sarah Stoltz
Social Class and Educational and Occupational Aspirations and Expectations: A Study of Females
M.A. Thesis, University of Iowa, 1975
Cohort(s): Young Women
Publisher: UMI - University Microfilms, Bell and Howell Information and Learning
Keyword(s): Educational Aspirations/Expectations; Family Background; High School; Occupational Aspirations; Socioeconomic Status (SES)

While this study gives somewhat more support to the common values theory than to the class differential varies theory, it does not provide strong support for either theory. Furthermore, it does not prove, as Han (1969) suggested, that both theories are operating depending upon the type of success values which is investigated. The findings for the occupation variables must be viewed with reservations. Nevertheless, despite these limitations, this study can be considered a positive contribution toward filling the void of information about females with respect to the relationship between socioeconomics status and success goals.
Bibliography Citation
Blew, Sarah Stoltz. Social Class and Educational and Occupational Aspirations and Expectations: A Study of Females. M.A. Thesis, University of Iowa, 1975.
3. Bolin, Phil Warren
Military Service and Military Vocational Training Effects on Post-Service Earnings
M.A. Thesis, Naval Postgraduate School - Monterey CA, 1980
Cohort(s): Young Men
Publisher: UMI - University Microfilms, Bell and Howell Information and Learning
Keyword(s): Earnings; I.Q.; Job Tenure; Military Service; Veterans; Vocational Education; Vocational Training; Work History

The influence of military service and military vocational training on post-service earnings was analyzed, using the NLS of Young Men (age 14-24 in l966). When individuals were classified by their propensity to use training, neither military service nor military vocational training was a significant determinant of post-service earnings. A disaggregation of the sample by I.Q. revealed that military service may be a proxy for ability level rather than a positive determinant of post-service earnings. Veterans who did not qualify for vocational training appear to suffer a post-service wage loss due to foregone civilian job tenure, which is relatively important to individuals who do not take vocational training.
Bibliography Citation
Bolin, Phil Warren. Military Service and Military Vocational Training Effects on Post-Service Earnings. M.A. Thesis, Naval Postgraduate School - Monterey CA, 1980.
4. Brown, Martha
Career Disruption Effects on Early Wages: A Comparison of Mothers and Women Without Children
M.A. Thesis, The Ohio State University, 1990
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: UMI - University Microfilms, Bell and Howell Information and Learning
Keyword(s): Career Patterns; Dual Economic Theory; Earnings; Human Capital Theory; Labor Market, Secondary; Maternal Employment; Mothers; Occupational Segregation; Occupations; Wages

This thesis examines differences between mothers and non-mothers in the relative disruption of careers and the process of earnings attainment. Combining human capital and dual labor market theories, the author hypothesizes that (1) mothers' and non-mothers' careers diverge both with respect to accumulated human capital and to the occupational labor market characteristics of their jobs; and (2) these variations are reflected in differential patterns of earnings attainment between the two groups. These hypotheses are tested on a sample of 5,314 women drawn from the NLSY who worked at any time between 1984 and 1987 (85% of the sample). Descriptive results reveal that mothers' careers are substantially more disrupted than the careers of non-mothers, and are characterized by lower wage jobs entailing less substantively complex work in occupational labor markets more heavily dominated by women and minorities. OLS analyses of earnings run separately for mothers and non-mothers indicates that while human capital accumulation plays the most important role in determining non-mothers' wages, occupational content and labor market composition outweigh human capital as determinants of mothers' wages. The disappearance of the negative effect of number of children on mothers' wages when indicators of career disruption are controlled suggests that motherhood is detrimental to women's earnings primarily because of its effects on labor force participation patterns.
Bibliography Citation
Brown, Martha. Career Disruption Effects on Early Wages: A Comparison of Mothers and Women Without Children. M.A. Thesis, The Ohio State University, 1990.
5. Choi, B. O.
Estimating High Tech Army Recruiting Markets
M.A. Thesis, Naval Postgraduate School - Monterey CA, 1992
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: UMI - University Microfilms, Bell and Howell Information and Learning
Keyword(s): Behavior; Labor Force Participation; Manpower Research; Military Recruitment; Military Service; Modeling

This thesis presents exploratory model-building for identifying and analyzing the recruiting market for highly technical occupations for the Army of the future. The high-tech ratings were defined based upon their technical characteristics, qualification rates of the youth labor market, and the Army force structure. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth ( NLSY), three regression equations were developed to estimate mental eligibility for high-tech ratings as well as interest in joining the military and actual joining behavior, so that recruiting commands can allocate recruiting resources more accurately and efficiently. These prototypical equations and this method of measuring the recruiting market for high-tech ratings provide a good beginning for estimating the recruiting market for any specific occupation.
Bibliography Citation
Choi, B. O. Estimating High Tech Army Recruiting Markets. M.A. Thesis, Naval Postgraduate School - Monterey CA, 1992.
6. Dixon, Megan M.
Repeat Births Among Adolescents: The Effects of Income, Education and Contraceptive Behaviors
M.A. Thesis, Wright State University, 1992
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: UMI - University Microfilms, Bell and Howell Information and Learning
Keyword(s): Adolescent Fertility; Birth Outcomes; Births, Repeat / Spacing; Contraception; Education; Income; Modeling

In the past thirty years societal interest in unwed adolescent pregnancies has grown. While much research has documented the nature and extent of the problem, there has been less development of theoretical models integrating the psychological and structural factors that explain this social problem. In this study a status attainment model of adolescent repeat births is developed and tested. The model is unique in that it analyzes adolescent motherhood as an important symbolic status. Adolescents seek to attain this status in the absence of legitimate avenues of success, income and education. I use the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (Center for Human Resource Research 1990) as the data set. Of the 160 unwed women in this sample who had given birth before their twentieth birthday, 84 had a second birth within a five year period. There was no significant difference between teens who had a repeat birth and those who did not for the following variables: race, residence, number of siblings or adolescent's mother's education. For analytic purposes the sample is divided into two groups, repeat birth and no repeat birth. Differences between the groups were studied using path analysis techniques. A path model of repeat births was developed integrating contraceptive behaviors, education and income. All three factors were directly related to repeat births at the p<.05 level of significance. Specifically, teens who used effective methods of contraception were less likely to have a repeat birth. Repeat births were also less likely to occur among adolescents with more years of schooling. Likewise, young mothers whose families had relatively high incomes were more likely to avoid a repeat birth. In addition, income and education were positively related at the p<.05 level of significance. This study provides social scientists and policy makers with evidence that psychological and structural factors of our society may be encouraging teens to bear children. While supporting effective contraceptive behaviors is necessary, teens also need motivation to use contraceptives. Equitable distribution of income and educational opportunities may provide adolescent girls with legitimate means to attaining status, and thus motivate them to use effective contraceptive techniques for the prevention of subsequent pregnancies.
Bibliography Citation
Dixon, Megan M. Repeat Births Among Adolescents: The Effects of Income, Education and Contraceptive Behaviors. M.A. Thesis, Wright State University, 1992.
7. Hachet, Kimberly A.
Determining Infants' and Toddlers' Home Environments: A Comprehensive Model of Children of Employed Mothers
M.A. Thesis, The Ohio State University, 1991
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: UMI - University Microfilms, Bell and Howell Information and Learning
Keyword(s): Child Health; Children, Home Environment; Gender Differences; Hispanics; Home Environment; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Marital Satisfaction/Quality; Marital Status; Maternal Employment; Poverty; Racial Differences; Regions

This paper examines determinants of the home environments of six to thirty-five month old children of employed mothers, using data from the 1988 NLSY Merged Child-Mother Data Set (N=554). Multiple regression reveals that male children, younger children, children with health problems, and children living in poverty have lower HOME scores. Children of black and Mexican-Hispanic mothers, mothers with low self-esteem, and mothers living in the South have weaker home environments. While greater occupational complexity of mothers results in a stronger home environment, the same for fathers results in a weaker home environment. Finally, fewer children and greater interaction of the mother with her spouse lead to stronger home environments.
Bibliography Citation
Hachet, Kimberly A. Determining Infants' and Toddlers' Home Environments: A Comprehensive Model of Children of Employed Mothers. M.A. Thesis, The Ohio State University, 1991.
8. Haurin, R. Jean
A Model of Educational Attainment from a Social Learning Perspective
M.A. Thesis, The Ohio State University, 1985
Cohort(s): Young Men, Young Women
Publisher: UMI - University Microfilms, Bell and Howell Information and Learning
Keyword(s): Educational Aspirations/Expectations; Educational Attainment; Family Influences; Fertility; Gender Differences; Marriage; Military Service; Parental Influences; Simultaneity

This paper develops a model of the individual educational attainment process using social learning theory as the framework. Hypotheses are developed concerning the influence of family background factors and significant others on educational achievement, aspirations, and educational attainment over a ten year period. Also considered are intervening life-cycle events such as marriage, fertility and military service which generally have not simultaneously been examined in previous research. Particular attention is devoted to sex differences in the educational attainment process. The model is empirically tested on nationally representative cohorts of males and females using two-stage least squares. The results provide support for the influence of the education of same-sex parent, income and parental encouragement as predicted by the social learning theory framework. However, further testing on data sets with greater detail on "significant other" relationships is advised. The results argue against using composites of parental characteristics. Mother's employment characteristics have little effect on the attainment process for either sex, while marriage and fertility events represent significant limitations only for females. Recommendations for future research include further development of attainment models for different race-gender groups. Particular attention should be given to investigating the impact of parental encouragement among these subgroups as well as to what differences in the educational attainment process obtain for youth from intact versus non-intact families.
Bibliography Citation
Haurin, R. Jean. A Model of Educational Attainment from a Social Learning Perspective. M.A. Thesis, The Ohio State University, 1985.
9. Hess, Mark W.
From School to Work via Military Service: An Improved Transition
M.A. Thesis, Naval Postgraduate School - Monterey CA, 1980
Cohort(s): Young Men
Publisher: UMI - University Microfilms, Bell and Howell Information and Learning
Keyword(s): Earnings; Industrial Sector; Job Search; Labor Market, Secondary; Military Service; Transition, School to Work; Veterans

Drawing on the implications of human capital theory, the screening hypothesis, and dual labor market theory, the NLS of Young Men age 14-24 in l966 was used to test the benefits of military service at civilian job entry. Veterans and non veterans of the same race were compared in each NLS year from l966 to l973 on 11 different variables using discriminant analysis. Five variables were selected from the results of discriminate analyses and studied longitudinally over the NLS years. Job entry occupation and industrial sector was examined using contingency tables. Veterans received significant and systematic pay rate advantages over better educated nonveterans. Veteran advantages were less obvious during the recession and recovery period of l970-l973. Military service may impart subtle labor market benefits such as productivity, experience, and maturity. Recommendations are provided to assist future veteran transitions during periods of economic instability.
Bibliography Citation
Hess, Mark W. From School to Work via Military Service: An Improved Transition. M.A. Thesis, Naval Postgraduate School - Monterey CA, 1980.
10. Higgins, R. J.
Specification of Veteran Status in Estimating Post-Service Civilian Earnings
M.A. Thesis, Naval Postgraduate School - Monterey CA, 1984
Cohort(s): Young Men
Publisher: UMI - University Microfilms, Bell and Howell Information and Learning
Keyword(s): Earnings; Employment; Military Enlistment; Military Service

This thesis analyzes the earnings of veterans and nonveterans by race over a fourteen year period from 1966 to 1980, using the NLS of Young Men aged 14 to 24 in 1966. The primary finding is that bonafide first term enlistees tend to have different returns to their veteran status than veterans as a whole and multi-term veterans in particular, and that these returns, on average, tend to be positive. This thesis also develops criteria for a single term of enlistment by length of service in a particular branch of the armed forces. In support of these findings, a working definition of full employment is also developed. The estimates of earnings equations for the fully employed subset of people are compared to the entire sample of young men. [NTIS AD-A150-581-7-XAB]
Bibliography Citation
Higgins, R. J. Specification of Veteran Status in Estimating Post-Service Civilian Earnings. M.A. Thesis, Naval Postgraduate School - Monterey CA, 1984.
11. Johnson, Thomas V.
Description of 'Profile of American Youth' Data for Military Manpower and Personnel Analysis
M.A. Thesis, Naval Postgraduate School - Monterey CA, 1983
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Naval Postgraduate School
Keyword(s): Behavior; Divorce; Dual-Career Families; Family Income; Family Structure; Housework/Housewives; Husbands; Marriage; Military Personnel; Profile of American Youth; Research Methodology

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The success of any military organization in accomplishing its mission depends largely on the quality of the personnel who constitute the organization. The NLSY and the Profile of American Youth (1980 nationwide administration of the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery) offer a wealth of information on the behavior and characteristics of a nationally representative sample of young men and women. This thesis has developed a data base extract designed primarily for analysts seeking to obtain insights on the current and projected 'quality' of military personnel. Instructions for using the data base extract are provided, along with a brief description of the survey and the computer program (SPSS) and a selected group of frequency distributions from the extract. [NTIS AD-A141-257-6]
Bibliography Citation
Johnson, Thomas V. Description of 'Profile of American Youth' Data for Military Manpower and Personnel Analysis. M.A. Thesis, Naval Postgraduate School - Monterey CA, 1983.
12. Jones, Elizabeth D.
Racial Comparisons of Female Labor Market Entry Models
M.A. Thesis, Baylor University, 1979
Cohort(s): Young Women
Publisher: UMI - University Microfilms, Bell and Howell Information and Learning
Keyword(s): Discrimination; Discrimination, Job; Discrimination, Racial/Ethnic; Earnings; Educational Attainment; Employment; I.Q.; Occupational Status; Socioeconomic Status (SES)

Attempts to discover the main determinants of variation in education, income, and occupational prestige for black and white females entering the job market reveal that in both the black and white models, years of education completed was the prime predictor of income and occupational prestige. The most pronounced difference between the models lies in the importance of structural and social-psychological variables for the black model as compared to the white model. Labor market discrimination appears to exist for occupational prestige but not for income.
Bibliography Citation
Jones, Elizabeth D. Racial Comparisons of Female Labor Market Entry Models. M.A. Thesis, Baylor University, 1979.
13. Mack, Karin Ann
Retirement Process of Women
M.A. Thesis, University of Maryland, 1991
Cohort(s): Mature Women
Publisher: UMI - University Microfilms, Bell and Howell Information and Learning
Keyword(s): Age and Ageing; Educational Attainment; Health Factors; Marital Status; Racial Differences; Retirement; Socioeconomic Status (SES)

Over the past several decades there has been a gradual groundswell of concern for quality of life at the older ages. These concerns grow as a function of the number of baby boomers entering middle life and as a larger proportion of the population becomes older. This research will focus on one aspect of older life-- retirement. It will further narrow its focus by concentrating on only the lives of women, a neglected area of retirement research. This research views retirement as a process with identifiable predictors of the age of retirement. Further it suggests that the predictors of retirement age for women may differ greatly from those factors relevant to men. The explanatory variables tested in this research include: socioeconomic status, education, health, occupation, race, and family variables. The significance of this research lies fundamentally with the neglect of women in previous retirement research. The goal of this research is to explore the retirement process for women and identify the predictors of age of retirement for women. Results indicate that retirement is significantly affected by marital status for white women at all ages. For black women, a variety of factors affect retirement between the ages of 55 and 59, the effects of which disappear after age 60. This project uses data from the NLS of Mature Women, a cohort of American women who were just beginning to retire in the late 1980s. Thus this research attempts an exploratory look at these data to set up a framework for future analysis.
Bibliography Citation
Mack, Karin Ann. Retirement Process of Women. M.A. Thesis, University of Maryland, 1991.
14. Moreau, E. E.
Forecasting High-Tech ASVAB Scores
M.A. Thesis, Naval Postgraduate School - Monterey CA, 1992
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: UMI - University Microfilms, Bell and Howell Information and Learning
Keyword(s): Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB); Labor Force Participation; Manpower Research; Military Recruitment; Military Service; Modeling; Program Participation/Evaluation; Urban and Regional Planning; Urbanization/Urban Living

Development of model for estimation of a high-tech market population is essential for determining an efficient allocation of recruiting resources. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY), regression equations are used to estimate the probability that a 17 to 21 year old, high school graduate will score high enough on the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB) to be classified into a high-tech rating. This probability is modeled as a function of sociodemographic variables including gender, race/ethnicity, parent's education, poverty status, income, residence in an urban area, and receipt of welfare payments. Best fit equations are developed in order to facilitate calculations of nationwide, county-level, high-tech market distributions.
Bibliography Citation
Moreau, E. E. Forecasting High-Tech ASVAB Scores. M.A. Thesis, Naval Postgraduate School - Monterey CA, 1992.
15. Payne, Allison Ann
Child-Rearing, Self-Control, and Deviance: An Examination of Gottfredson and Hirschi's General Theory of Crime
M.A. Thesis, University of Maryland, 1999
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: UMI - University Microfilms, Bell and Howell Information and Learning
Keyword(s): Child Development; Children, Behavioral Development; Children, Temperament; Delinquency/Gang Activity; Parenting Skills/Styles; Parents, Behavior

Many researchers over the years have provided support for the relationship between early childhood socialization and deviant behavior. Gottfredson and Hirschi (1990) added an intervening variable into the equation, the concept of self-control. Self-control is an internal barrier that restrains individuals from engaging in criminal and imprudent behaviors. When parents lack effective child-rearing skills, their children are more likely to have low levels of self-control, which would then lead to high participation in deviant activities. While only a few studies have examined the proposed relationship between child-rearing skills and the development of self-control, the sparse findings are supportive of this link. Similarly, the many studies that have examined the relationship between self-control and criminal and imprudent behaviors provide evidence that, while not overwhelming, is generally supportive of Gottfredson and Hirschi's theory. The problem set forth in this research is twofold: (1) does poor child-rearing lead to low levels of self-control and (2) do low levels of self-control lead to high participation in deviant behavior? Mother-reported and child-reported data were used to conduct the analyses. The results indicate that some aspects of child-rearing are associated with levels of self-control and that self-control levels are associated with deviance participation.
Bibliography Citation
Payne, Allison Ann. Child-Rearing, Self-Control, and Deviance: An Examination of Gottfredson and Hirschi's General Theory of Crime. M.A. Thesis, University of Maryland, 1999.
16. Pearce, Debra M.
Job Satisfaction of Low Income Men Ages 45-59
M.S. Thesis, The Ohio State University, 1977
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: UMI - University Microfilms, Bell and Howell Information and Learning
Keyword(s): Age and Ageing; Earnings; Educational Attainment; Job Satisfaction

An examination of job satisfaction among men age 45 to 59 who are below the poverty level as defined by the U.S. Bureau of the Census showed that job satisfaction is markedly influenced by a worker's perception of his job situation, his age, his educational attainment, and his change in real income over time. The data do not support the views, however, that: (1) the greater the weeks of unemployment in the past, the greater will be a worker's satisfaction with his job when he finally does secure employment; and (2) the greater the number of hours worked per week, the less his job satisfaction will be.
Bibliography Citation
Pearce, Debra M. Job Satisfaction of Low Income Men Ages 45-59. M.S. Thesis, The Ohio State University, 1977.
17. Peterson, J. M.
AFQT Score Forecasting Models for Regional Estimation of Qualified Military Available
M.A. Thesis, Naval Postgraduate School - Monterey CA, 1990
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: UMI - University Microfilms, Bell and Howell Information and Learning
Keyword(s): Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB); Income; Labor Force Participation; Manpower Research; Military Recruitment; Military Service; Modeling; Program Participation/Evaluation; Tests and Testing

Estimation of regional distributions of qualified military available (QMA) population is essential for determining an efficient allocation of recruiting resources. Estimates of regional mental ability distribution are required in order to estimate QMA. Using data from the Youth National Longitudinal Survey (NLSY), logit regression equations are used to estimate the probability that a 17 to 21 year old high school graduate will score above the 50th percentile on the Armed Forces Qualification Test (AFQT). This probability is modeled as a function of sociodemographic variables including gender, race/ethnicity, parent's education, poverty status, income, residence in an urban area and receipt of welfare payments. Best fit equations are developed in order to facilitate calculation of nationwide county level AFQT distributions.
Bibliography Citation
Peterson, J. M. AFQT Score Forecasting Models for Regional Estimation of Qualified Military Available. M.A. Thesis, Naval Postgraduate School - Monterey CA, 1990.
18. Rickman, J. L.
Predicting High Quality AFQT with Youth Attitude Tracking Study Data
M.A. Thesis, Naval Postgraduate School - Monterey CA, 1991
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: UMI - University Microfilms, Bell and Howell Information and Learning
Keyword(s): Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB); Labor Force Participation; Manpower Research; Military Recruitment; Military Service; Modeling; Program Participation/Evaluation; Tests and Testing

This thesis demonstrates that Youth Attitude Tracking Study (YATS) data can be used to create a synthetic AFQT classification procedure for distinguishing high quality respondents. Unlike previous methods, the procedure does not rely on interest in the military to predict AFQT category. The estimates are based on an analysis of the YATS data matched with the Defense Manpower Data Center cohort data file using a binomial logistic regression model. The market segment analyzed is 17 to 21 year old males who are either high school graduates or prospective graduates. The dependent variable is whether or not a respondent would score above the fiftieth percentile on the Armed Forces Qualification Test. The explanatory variables reflect individual demographic, educational and labor market characteristics at the time of YATS interview. The YATS time frame is restricted to 1983 through 1985 in order to facilitate future bridging of YATS models with models estimated with similar time period data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY). Additionally, the models may be used to provide estimates of AFQT quality for more recent YATS respondents.
Bibliography Citation
Rickman, J. L. Predicting High Quality AFQT with Youth Attitude Tracking Study Data. M.A. Thesis, Naval Postgraduate School - Monterey CA, 1991.
19. Soyak, E.
Post-service Earnings of Vietman-era Veterans
M.A. Thesis, Naval Postgraduate School - Monterey CA, 1987
Cohort(s): Young Men
Publisher: UMI - University Microfilms, Bell and Howell Information and Learning
Keyword(s): Earnings; Military Service; Military Training; Veterans; Vietnam War

This thesis analyzed the effect of military service and military training on post service earnings using the NLS of Young Men (14 to 24 years of age in 1966). When data were disaggregated by race and veteran status, some differences appeared between the earnings of veterans and non-veterans. A Chow test indicated that the data could not be pooled for blacks and non-blacks. An analysis of earnings revealed that the effect of veteran status on postservice earnings is inconclusive. Further analysis of wage equations and annual income equations of veterans showed that veteran status does not have significant returns from either military training or time spent in the service. [NTIS AD-A-191-225-2-XAB]
Bibliography Citation
Soyak, E. Post-service Earnings of Vietman-era Veterans. M.A. Thesis, Naval Postgraduate School - Monterey CA, 1987.
20. Thompson, M. Dewana
An Ecological Examination of the Self-Esteem of Students Receiving Special Education Services
M.A. Thesis, Michigan State University, 1995
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: UMI - University Microfilms, Bell and Howell Information and Learning
Keyword(s): Education; Educational Attainment; Home Environment; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Mothers, Education; Self-Esteem

The purpose of this study is to examine the relationships between the self esteem levels of students in special education programs and maternal self esteem levels, maternal expectations, academic achievement and the home environment. Research examining the self esteem of this population of students has typically used school related variables as sole predictors of self esteem and examined between group differences. This study addresses these deficits by exploring within group differences from an ecological perspective. A secondary analysis of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth data set was conducted. The sample included 208 children between the ages of 8 and 15 who were enrolled in remedial special education classes and their mothers. This study found that children that had higher perceptions of their academic and global ability were in fact high academic achievers and had mothers that expected them to attain higher levels of education. Children with higher leve ls of se lf esteem did not have mothers with higher levels of self esteem or come from more supportive home environments, but significant relationships amongst the predictor variables suggests that there may be indirect relationships between these variables and child self esteem and warrants further research.
Bibliography Citation
Thompson, M. Dewana. An Ecological Examination of the Self-Esteem of Students Receiving Special Education Services. M.A. Thesis, Michigan State University, 1995.