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Source: Journal of Occupational Medicine
Resulting in 3 citations.
1. Herold, Joan
Waldron, Ingrid
Part-time Employment and Women's Health
Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine 27,6 (June 1985): 405-412.
Also: http://journals.lww.com/joem/Abstract/1985/06000/Part_Time_Employment_and_Women_s_Health.10.aspx
Cohort(s): Mature Women
Publisher: American Occupational Medical Assciation, 1968-
Keyword(s): Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Part-Time Work; Racial Differences; Self-Reporting; Socioeconomic Status (SES); Women

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The relationships between part-time employment and self-reported health are analyzed for a national probability sample of middle-aged women. Overall, there was a tendency for full-time workers to have the best health, part- time workers to have intermediate health, and women who were not in the labor force to have the poorest health. However, the pattern varied by race and marital status. For married black women, part-time workers reported poorer health than full-time workers. This appeared to be due in part to the lower socioeconomic status between part-time and full-time workers. Additional hypotheses and relevant evidence are presented in the paper.
Bibliography Citation
Herold, Joan and Ingrid Waldron. "Part-time Employment and Women's Health." Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine 27,6 (June 1985): 405-412.
2. Waldron, Ingrid
Herold, Joan
Dunn, Dennis
Staum, Roger
Reciprocal Effects of Health and Labor Force Participation Among Women: Evidence from Two Longitudinal Studies
Journal of Occupational Medicine 24,2 (February 1982): 126-132.
Also: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7057280
Cohort(s): Mature Women
Publisher: American Occupational Medical Assciation, 1968-
Keyword(s): Blue-Collar Jobs; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Retirement; Self-Reporting; Wives; Work History

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study examines the effects of health on labor force participation and the effects of labor force participation on women's health. The results indicate that there are significant relationships between self- reported health and subsequent changes in labor force participation; however, no significant relationships were observed between labor force participation and subsequent self-reported change in health. The evidence shows that health affects women's labor force participation; however, no evidence was found that, on the average, labor force participation has harmful or beneficial effects on the general health of middle-aged married women.
Bibliography Citation
Waldron, Ingrid, Joan Herold, Dennis Dunn and Roger Staum. "Reciprocal Effects of Health and Labor Force Participation Among Women: Evidence from Two Longitudinal Studies." Journal of Occupational Medicine 24,2 (February 1982): 126-132.
3. Waldron, Ingrid
Jacobs, Jerry A.
Effects of Labor Force Participation on Women's Health - New Evidence from a Longitudinal Study
Journal of Occupational Medicine 30,12 (December 1988): 977-983
Cohort(s): Mature Women
Publisher: American Occupational Medical Assciation, 1968-
Keyword(s): Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Labor Force Participation; Marital Status; Occupational Status; Part-Time Work; Women

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The effects of labor force participation on women's health are evaluated in analyses of data from the NLS of Mature Women. The results indicate that labor force participation had beneficial effects on health for unmarried women and for married black women with blue collar usual occupations. In contrast, labor force participation appears to have had harmful effects on health for married women with white collar usual occupations. Our findings, taken together with previous evidence, suggest that employment contributes to increased social support and consequently employment has beneficial effects on health for unmarried women and for married women whose husbands are not emotionally supportive confidants. Additional results from this study showed no significant difference in the health effects of part-time and full-time employment.
Bibliography Citation
Waldron, Ingrid and Jerry A. Jacobs. "Effects of Labor Force Participation on Women's Health - New Evidence from a Longitudinal Study." Journal of Occupational Medicine 30,12 (December 1988): 977-983.