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Source: Journal of Economics, Race, and Policy
Resulting in 2 citations.
1. Bogan, Vicki L.
Wu, Di
Business Cycles, Race, and Investment in Graduate Education
Journal of Economics, Race, and Policy 1,2-3 (September 2018): 142-175.
Also: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s41996-018-0004-x
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Business Cycles; College Degree; College Major/Field of Study/Courses; Educational Attainment; Racial Differences; Unemployment Rate

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper examines how macroeconomic factors influence household decision making with regard to human capital investment. We provide evidence suggestive of a causal relationship between macroeconomic indicators and the decision to pursue graduate education. Overall, we find graduate school enrollment is counter-cyclical with the business cycle and the magnitude of the relationship between macroeconomic indicators and the specific type of graduate school programs varies. In particular, we find differential racial effects of the business cycle on graduate school enrollment. The magnitude of the effects of the business cycle on graduate school enrollment is greater for some under-represented minority groups.
Bibliography Citation
Bogan, Vicki L. and Di Wu. "Business Cycles, Race, and Investment in Graduate Education." Journal of Economics, Race, and Policy 1,2-3 (September 2018): 142-175.
2. Smythe, Andria C.
Labor Market Conditions and Racial/Ethnic Differences in College Enrollment
Journal of Economics, Race, and Policy published online (9 May 2019): DOI: 10.1007/s41996-019-00030-4.
Also: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s41996-019-00030-4
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): College Enrollment; Ethnic Differences; Modeling, Fixed Effects; Racial Differences; Unemployment Rate

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The racial/ethnic differences in college enrollment are pervasive and persistent. In this article, I provide evidence of a business cycle-driven component to the college enrollment gaps among racial/ethnic groups in the USA. Using a nationally representative sample from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youths 1997 (NLSY97) and fixed-effects enrollment probability models, I find that Hispanics are more likely than non-Black-non-Hispanics to enroll in 2-year college during high unemployment periods. Similarly, I find that individuals who are Black are more likely than non-Black-non-Hispanic individuals to enroll in 2-year colleges but are less likely to enroll in 4-year colleges during periods of high unemployment. The positive effect of high unemployment rate on 2-year college enrollment for Blacks is almost entirely offset by negative effects on 4-year college enrollment. Non-Black-non-Hispanics are least sensitive to labor market conditions. The cyclicality of college enrollment rates of Blacks and Hispanics and the relatively smooth enrollment rates of non-Black-non-Hispanic individuals may be able to explain a part of the persistent gap in college enrollment.
Bibliography Citation
Smythe, Andria C. "Labor Market Conditions and Racial/Ethnic Differences in College Enrollment." Journal of Economics, Race, and Policy published online (9 May 2019): DOI: 10.1007/s41996-019-00030-4.