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Source: Brown University
Resulting in 3 citations.
1. Minca, Elisabeta
Becoming an Adult in America: What Does It Mean and How It Has Changed in the Past 20 Years?
Ph.D. Dissertation, Department of Sociology, Brown University, 2011.
Also: https://repository.library.brown.edu/studio/item/bdr:11162/
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY97
Publisher: Brown University
Keyword(s): Depression (see also CESD); Life Course; Modeling, Latent Class Analysis/Latent Transition Analysis; Transition, Adulthood

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using a life course perspective, I examine changes that occurred in the past two decades in the process of becoming an adult by comparing two cohorts of U.S. adolescents, one born in the 1960s and the other born in the early 1980s. The study uses data from the 1979 and 1997 National Longitudinal Surveys of Youth. I use hierarchical latent class models that examine pathways to adulthood for the two cohorts in a holistic fashion, taking into account the relationships between various roles teenagers and young adults occupy simultaneously, as well as how they unfold over the life course.
Bibliography Citation
Minca, Elisabeta. Becoming an Adult in America: What Does It Mean and How It Has Changed in the Past 20 Years? Ph.D. Dissertation, Department of Sociology, Brown University, 2011..
2. Prakash, Shivaani Gyan
The Relationship between Mental Health Capital and Labor Market Outcomes: Evidence from the U.S. and Chile
Ph.D. Dissertation, Department of Health Services, Policy and Practice, Brown University, 2014.
Also: https://repository.library.brown.edu/studio/item/bdr:386213/
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Brown University
Keyword(s): Children, Health Care; Health Reform; Health, Mental; Insurance, Health; Legislation

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The prevalence of mental illness has been rising rapidly in the United States and abroad in the last two decades. Common mental disorders take a heavy toll on sufferers both directly, in terms of high medical costs; and indirectly, in terms of reduced labor supply and decreased mental health status. In addition, there is a high rate of unmet need for mental health services among sufferers of mental disorders. To address these issues, policymakers require a strong understanding of: 1) the scope of the societal costs attributable to mental disorders, and 2) the expected benefits of expanding access to mental health services through health policy. In the first two chapters, I use a quasi-experimental design and nationally representative data to examine the impact of U.S. state mental health parity laws on labor outcomes in the adult population and mental health service utilization outcomes in the child population from 1988 and 2008. Our findings suggest that among privately insured adults, labor outcomes were largely unaffected by the passage of strong parity laws, but adults who suffered from likely depression saw a significant increase in their odds of being employed. Within the population of privately insured children, the passage of mental health parity laws led to a significant increase in the odds of children seeing a mental health provider and receiving insurance coverage for the visit. Strikingly, there was also a dramatic increase in the odds that children took a prescription medication for a behavioral or mental problem when a strong parity law was passed. Taken together, these findings suggest that employers did not pass the costs of complying with mental health parity laws onto their employees and these laws were specifically active in increasing access to certain services.
Bibliography Citation
Prakash, Shivaani Gyan. The Relationship between Mental Health Capital and Labor Market Outcomes: Evidence from the U.S. and Chile. Ph.D. Dissertation, Department of Health Services, Policy and Practice, Brown University, 2014..
3. Zagame, Amanda Carol
Understanding Fathering and Adolescents' Wellbeing: Father Figures and Transition to Young Adulthood
Ph.D. Dissertation, Department of Sociology, Brown University, 2022.
Also: https://repository.library.brown.edu/studio/item/bdr:wdjqhf59/
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Brown University
Keyword(s): Cohabitation; Educational Attainment; Family Characteristics; Fathers; Fathers, Influence; Fathers, Involvement; Marital History/Transitions; Transition, Adulthood; Well-Being

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

With growing diversity in American families, more adolescents identify male figures as social fathers. Social fathers, who are neither biological fathers nor romantic partners of the biological mothers, are the male father figures who advise and mentor adolescents and provide social support and social capital. Yet, little is known about how social fathers play a role in adolescents' transition to young adulthood. Applying the life course and social capital theories, this dissertation examines the family circumstances in which social fathers emerge and explores how social fathers play a role shaping adolescents' educational attainment and union formation. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 (NLSY97), I present three empirical chapters. In Chapter 1, I apply event history analysis to show under what family circumstances and for which child characteristics and situations social fathers tend to enter the picture. In Chapter 2, I use logistic regression models to study the association of father figure type and educational attainment. I find that having a social father may have the same benefits in college completion as having a present biological father. Finally, in Chapter 3, I use logistic regression models to study how father figure type might influence young adult's union formation (marriage or cohabitation). I find adolescents with a social father have greater likelihoods of marrying or cohabiting rather than remain single through their 20s than those with no father figures. This work makes an important contribution to the fields of family demography and social inequality. By considering various types of father figures, broadly defined, I aim to demonstrate how increasingly diverse fathering arrangements matter in the wellbeing of children during their transition from adolescence to young adulthood.
Bibliography Citation
Zagame, Amanda Carol. Understanding Fathering and Adolescents' Wellbeing: Father Figures and Transition to Young Adulthood. Ph.D. Dissertation, Department of Sociology, Brown University, 2022..