Search Results

Author: Prakash, Shivaani Gyan
Resulting in 1 citation.
1. Prakash, Shivaani Gyan
The Relationship between Mental Health Capital and Labor Market Outcomes: Evidence from the U.S. and Chile
Ph.D. Dissertation, Department of Health Services, Policy and Practice, Brown University, 2014.
Also: https://repository.library.brown.edu/studio/item/bdr:386213/
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Brown University
Keyword(s): Children, Health Care; Health Reform; Health, Mental; Insurance, Health; Legislation

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The prevalence of mental illness has been rising rapidly in the United States and abroad in the last two decades. Common mental disorders take a heavy toll on sufferers both directly, in terms of high medical costs; and indirectly, in terms of reduced labor supply and decreased mental health status. In addition, there is a high rate of unmet need for mental health services among sufferers of mental disorders. To address these issues, policymakers require a strong understanding of: 1) the scope of the societal costs attributable to mental disorders, and 2) the expected benefits of expanding access to mental health services through health policy. In the first two chapters, I use a quasi-experimental design and nationally representative data to examine the impact of U.S. state mental health parity laws on labor outcomes in the adult population and mental health service utilization outcomes in the child population from 1988 and 2008. Our findings suggest that among privately insured adults, labor outcomes were largely unaffected by the passage of strong parity laws, but adults who suffered from likely depression saw a significant increase in their odds of being employed. Within the population of privately insured children, the passage of mental health parity laws led to a significant increase in the odds of children seeing a mental health provider and receiving insurance coverage for the visit. Strikingly, there was also a dramatic increase in the odds that children took a prescription medication for a behavioral or mental problem when a strong parity law was passed. Taken together, these findings suggest that employers did not pass the costs of complying with mental health parity laws onto their employees and these laws were specifically active in increasing access to certain services.
Bibliography Citation
Prakash, Shivaani Gyan. The Relationship between Mental Health Capital and Labor Market Outcomes: Evidence from the U.S. and Chile. Ph.D. Dissertation, Department of Health Services, Policy and Practice, Brown University, 2014..