Search Results

Source: American Economist
Resulting in 3 citations.
1. Frantz, Roger Scott
Attitudes and Work Performance Among Young Men During the Transition from School to Work
American Economist 26,1 (Spring 1982): 43-50.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/pss/25603359
Cohort(s): Young Men
Publisher: Omicron Delta Phi
Keyword(s): Educational Aspirations/Expectations; Health, Mental; Internal-External Attitude; Mobility; Racial Differences; Simultaneity; Transition, School to Work; Work Attitudes

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study attempts to build on earlier ones utilizing longitudinal survey data by assuming that labor market performance and attitude changes during work are simultaneously determined. That is, attitudes which affect work performance are simultaneously affected by them, as well as by non-work experience. A model is designed to estimate these relationships for young men who are experiencing their initial full-time contract with the labor market, which investigates how attitudes affect labor market performance during the transition from school to the world of work. Taken together the results indicate that internal-external attitudes have substantial effects on subsequent labor market performance and that they are responsive to work. Furthermore the data supports the hypothesis that economic progress among blacks can be enhanced through the development of internal attitudes among blacks. This development, in turn, is seen as dependent upon increasing the mobility of blacks which would assure them of greater wage gains with the aging process. Finally the "phase transition" seen occurring between the ages of 21 and 24 would seem to show that $1 spent on "mental health" at age 21 may be as productive as many more dollars spent at age 25.
Bibliography Citation
Frantz, Roger Scott. "Attitudes and Work Performance Among Young Men During the Transition from School to Work." American Economist 26,1 (Spring 1982): 43-50.
2. Steen, Todd P.
An Analysis of Secondary Child Care Arrangements
American Economist 38,1 (Spring 1994): 82-91.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/pss/25603995
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Omicron Delta Phi
Keyword(s): Child Care; Current Population Survey (CPS) / CPS-Fertility Supplement; Modeling, Logit; Mothers; Mothers, Education; Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

A study suggests that the use of secondary child care reflects parents' efforts to enhance the quality of care. Data were drawn from the 1986 and 1988 National Longitudinal Survey Youth Cohort, the June 1982 Current Population Survey, and the 1984-85 Survey of Income and Program Participation. Logit estimates show that mothers with older children and mothers with higher wages are more likely to use a secondary care arrangement. Results also indicate that secondary care is used more often by whites and by more educated mothers. The findings suggest that the use of secondary child care does not stem from a lack of adequate and flexible primary sources of care. Instead, secondary care may be used to better suit the needs of both parents and child.
Bibliography Citation
Steen, Todd P. "An Analysis of Secondary Child Care Arrangements." American Economist 38,1 (Spring 1994): 82-91.
3. Wescher, Lance
Hutchinson, Travis
Rannou, Anna
Minimum Wages, Employment, and College Enrollment
The American Economist published online (20 July 2018): DOI: 10.1177/0569434518787485.
Also: http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/0569434518787485
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Omicron Delta Phi
Keyword(s): College Enrollment; Employment; Geocoded Data; Legislation; State-Level Data/Policy; Wages

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Most studies of the effects of minimum wage laws look exclusively at the labor market. This article investigates the less-researched topic of the effects of a minimum wage increase on enrollment in undergraduate higher education institutions in the United States. With a higher opportunity cost of pursuing an education given a higher minimum wage, potential students may opt to work instead of attend college. Conversely, if an increase in the minimum wage raises the unemployment rate for young workers, more people may enroll in college, as they are unable to find employment. Using restricted geocode variables and panel data from National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY97) over a period of time in which every state saw an increase in its effective minimum wage, we find that higher minimum wages do correspond to lower levels of college enrollment. We use a multinomial probit model to examine how tradeoffs are made between employment and college enrollment. Finally, we examine the transition path between college enrollment and employment.
Bibliography Citation
Wescher, Lance, Travis Hutchinson and Anna Rannou. "Minimum Wages, Employment, and College Enrollment." The American Economist published online (20 July 2018): DOI: 10.1177/0569434518787485.