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Author: Ricketts, Comfort F.
Resulting in 2 citations.
1. Ricketts, Comfort F.
Campbell, Randall C.
Rezek, Jon P.
The Effects of Work Hours on Physical and Mental Health of Late Prime Age Men and Women
The American Economist 64,2 (October 2019): 216-236.
Also: https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/0569434519848977
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Omicron Delta Phi
Keyword(s): Gender Differences; Health, Mental; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Work Hours

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Our results show that negative returns to health outcomes set in at around 50 work hours per week, and that the negative effects of working long hours manifest earlier for women than men. Increased work hours are associated with higher incomes and better access to medical care. However, increased work hours also generate greater physical and mental stress, which may cause health problems. We examine these questions empirically with data from the 2006 wave of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY), using two-stage least squares to account for endogeneity of work hours and income in the health outcomes model.
Bibliography Citation
Ricketts, Comfort F., Randall C. Campbell and Jon P. Rezek. "The Effects of Work Hours on Physical and Mental Health of Late Prime Age Men and Women." The American Economist 64,2 (October 2019): 216-236.
2. Ricketts, Comfort F.
Rezek, Jon P.
Campbell, Randall C.
The Influence of Individual Health Outcomes on Individual Savings Behavior
Social Science Journal 50,4 (December 2013): 471-481.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0362331913001225
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Depression (see also CESD); Gender Differences; Health, Mental; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Savings

In this essay, data from the 2006 wave of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY79-2006), and the two stage least squares (2SLS) estimation technique are used to investigate the relationship between health outcomes and the willingness of individuals (age 41–50) to save. Health perception, physical component score, mental component score, depression score and the diagnosis of a variety of health problems are used as health measures for the analysis described in this essay. We find that health perception and physical component score are positively related to the willingness of individuals to save; while the diagnosis of major health problems is negatively related to the willingness of individuals to save. The effect of mental component score and depression score on individuals’ willingness to save differs significantly between males and females. A higher mental component score is found to be positively related to the willingness of females to save; while depression score is found to affect the willingness of females to save negatively. Both mental component score and depression score are not related to the willingness of male respondents to save.
Bibliography Citation
Ricketts, Comfort F., Jon P. Rezek and Randall C. Campbell. "The Influence of Individual Health Outcomes on Individual Savings Behavior." Social Science Journal 50,4 (December 2013): 471-481.