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Source: Academy of Management
Resulting in 4 citations.
1. Ganzach, Yoav
Intelligence and Job Satisfaction
Academy of Management Journal 41,5 (October 1998): 526-539.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/pss/256940
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Academy of Management
Keyword(s): Cognitive Ability; Education; Intelligence; Job Satisfaction

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Suggests that cognitive variables, and intelligence in particular, may be important determinants of job satisfaction. The relationship between intelligence and job satisfaction was analyzed on the basis of a model in which intelligence has a direct negative effect on job satisfaction, an indirect positive effect, mediated by job complexity, and an interactive effect with job complexity. The roles of background variables, in particular education, and the implications of the findings for theories of job satisfaction were also examined. Data was drawn from reports by 5,423 participants in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. Results show that intelligence was associated positively with job satisfaction. However, intelligence also is associated negatively with satisfaction when job complexity is held constant. This negative direct effect of intelligence on job satisfaction is mediated by job complexity: the effect decreases with an increase in job complexity. ((c) 1999 APA/PsycINFO, all rights reserved)
Bibliography Citation
Ganzach, Yoav. "Intelligence and Job Satisfaction." Academy of Management Journal 41,5 (October 1998): 526-539.
2. Parks-Yancy, Rochelle
Antecedents of Managerial and Professional Career Trajectories and Their Differential Effects on Blacks and Whites: Gaining Parity Through Human and Social Capital
Academy of Management Proceedings (2002): A1- A6.
Also: http://search.epnet.com/direct.asp?an=7516568&db=buh
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Academy of Management
Keyword(s): Career Patterns; Human Capital; Income Distribution; Labor Market Outcomes; Racial Differences; Socioeconomic Status (SES)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Research has shown that blacks and whites do not have the same level of success in managerial and professional careers. On average, whites gain higher salaries and rewards and obtain jobs that have greater responsibility and authority than blacks. While there has been extensive research on the effects family socioeconomic status (SES) (Blau & Duncan, 1967) and human capital (Durham et. al., 1995) on labor market outcomes, there has not been sufficient attention given to the effects of social capital on blacks compared to whites (Seibert et. al., 2001). This paper explores the effects of social capital on income differences between blacks and whites, net of the effects of socioeconomic background and human capital, for a sample of young adults. While extensive research has documented the labor market outcomes for blacks and whites, there is relatively limited research on blacks in managerial and professional careers. Prior research specifically on blacks has looked at the career progress of blacks who participated in the youth development program, ABC (A Better Chance), (Zweigenhaft & Domhoff, 1991), racial and gender differences in performance assessments (Smith et. al., 2001) and minorities' success in corporate management (DiTomaso &Thompson, 1988).

The data were from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY). These data are ideal for this study because its longitudinal format enables the study of careers over time and contains measures that can be used as indicators of family SES, human capital, and social capital. This study focused on the time frame of 1988-1998, chosen because the youngest of the respondents in 1979 (aged 14) would have been at an age to have completed college (if they attended) and be employed in full-time work in 1988. Survey questions included as measures in this paper were not necessarily asked of the respondents every year. The sample size for the analysis herein included 221 blacks and 537 whites.

Bibliography Citation
Parks-Yancy, Rochelle. "Antecedents of Managerial and Professional Career Trajectories and Their Differential Effects on Blacks and Whites: Gaining Parity Through Human and Social Capital." Academy of Management Proceedings (2002): A1- A6.
3. Raffiee, Joseph
Feng, Jie
Should I Quit My Day Job?: A Hybrid Path to Entrepreneurship
Academic of Management Journal 57,4 (1 August 2014): 936-963.
Also: http://amj.aom.org/content/57/4/936.abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Academy of Management
Keyword(s): Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Entrepreneurship; Modeling, Hazard/Event History/Survival/Duration; Risk-Taking; Self-Employed Workers

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Research suggests that the risk and uncertainty associated with entrepreneurial activity deters entry and contributes to the high rates of new business failure. In this study, we examine how the ability to reduce these factors by means of hybrid entrepreneurship—the process of starting a business while retaining a “day job” in an existing organization—influences entrepreneurial entry and survival. Integrating insights from real options theory with logic from the individual differences literature, we hypothesize and find that individuals who are risk averse and have low core self-evaluation are more likely to enter hybrid entrepreneurship relative to full-time self-employment. In turn, we argue and find that hybrid entrepreneurs who subsequently enter full-time self-employment (i.e., quit their day job) have much higher rates of survival relative to individuals who enter full-time self-employment directly from paid employment. Adding support to our theory that the survival advantage is driven by a learning effect that takes place during hybrid entrepreneurship, we find that the decrease in exit hazard is stronger for individuals with prior entrepreneurial experience. Taken together, our findings suggest that individual characteristics may play a greater role in determining the process of how (rather than if) entrepreneurial entry occurs, and that the process of how entrepreneurial entry transpires has important implications for new business survival.
Bibliography Citation
Raffiee, Joseph and Jie Feng. "Should I Quit My Day Job?: A Hybrid Path to Entrepreneurship." Academic of Management Journal 57,4 (1 August 2014): 936-963.
4. Trevor, Charles Oliver
Interactions among Actual Ease-of-Movement Determinants and Job Satisfaction in the Prediction of Voluntary Turnover
Academy of Management Journal 44,4 (August 2001): 621-638
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Academy of Management
Keyword(s): Cognitive Ability; Education; Human Capital; Job Satisfaction; Mobility, Job; Training; Unemployment Rate; Variables, Independent - Covariate

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Emphasizing that both general job availability and individual attributes determine actual ease of movement in the job market, I propose a voluntary turnover model that combines aspects of signaling and human capital perspectives with approaches emphasizing job satisfaction and general job availability. Longitudinal data on 5,506 individuals were analyzed via survival analysis with time-dependent covariates and repeated turnover events. Most notably, the effects of job satisfaction and unemployment rate on voluntary turnover were moderated by education, cognitive ability, and occupation-specific training.
Bibliography Citation
Trevor, Charles Oliver. "Interactions among Actual Ease-of-Movement Determinants and Job Satisfaction in the Prediction of Voluntary Turnover." Academy of Management Journal 44,4 (August 2001): 621-638.