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Author: Raffiee, Joseph
Resulting in 2 citations.
1. Raffiee, Joseph
Three Essays on Employee Mobility
Ph.D. Dissertation, Department of Business, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 2016
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: ProQuest Dissertations & Theses (PQDT)
Keyword(s): Firms; Human Capital; Job Skills; Job Tenure; Korea, Korean; Mobility, Job; Training

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

In this dissertation, I examine the strategic implications of employee mobility through the development of three inter-related empirical essays...In essay 3, I examine ways in which firms can constrain employee mobility by investigating the micro-foundations of firm-specific human capital – skills which are less valued by external firms. I highlight that the efficacy of firm-specific human capital to function as a mobility constraint requires strong assumptions of informational efficiency and develop theory to explain why perceptions of firm-specific human capital may differ from theoretical predictions in extant strategy theory.
Bibliography Citation
Raffiee, Joseph. Three Essays on Employee Mobility. Ph.D. Dissertation, Department of Business, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 2016.
2. Raffiee, Joseph
Feng, Jie
Should I Quit My Day Job?: A Hybrid Path to Entrepreneurship
Academic of Management Journal 57,4 (1 August 2014): 936-963.
Also: http://amj.aom.org/content/57/4/936.abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Academy of Management
Keyword(s): Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Entrepreneurship; Modeling, Hazard/Event History/Survival/Duration; Risk-Taking; Self-Employed Workers

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Research suggests that the risk and uncertainty associated with entrepreneurial activity deters entry and contributes to the high rates of new business failure. In this study, we examine how the ability to reduce these factors by means of hybrid entrepreneurship—the process of starting a business while retaining a “day job” in an existing organization—influences entrepreneurial entry and survival. Integrating insights from real options theory with logic from the individual differences literature, we hypothesize and find that individuals who are risk averse and have low core self-evaluation are more likely to enter hybrid entrepreneurship relative to full-time self-employment. In turn, we argue and find that hybrid entrepreneurs who subsequently enter full-time self-employment (i.e., quit their day job) have much higher rates of survival relative to individuals who enter full-time self-employment directly from paid employment. Adding support to our theory that the survival advantage is driven by a learning effect that takes place during hybrid entrepreneurship, we find that the decrease in exit hazard is stronger for individuals with prior entrepreneurial experience. Taken together, our findings suggest that individual characteristics may play a greater role in determining the process of how (rather than if) entrepreneurial entry occurs, and that the process of how entrepreneurial entry transpires has important implications for new business survival.
Bibliography Citation
Raffiee, Joseph and Jie Feng. "Should I Quit My Day Job?: A Hybrid Path to Entrepreneurship." Academic of Management Journal 57,4 (1 August 2014): 936-963.